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tuna mango martini mac's shack wellfleet,ma

We have a vague recollection of the makeup of this fabulous app @ mac's. Tryin' to recall the ingredients. (great nights and drinks) NEED HELP TO RE-CREATE @ home!

Lucky Dog in Provincetown...still open?

I read a blip on a blog saying this place has closed. Has anyone been there recently?

Verjus in the Abany / Saratoga region

Anyone know where to find this in our area. A search for the local warehouse stores are coming up empty.

Homemade pasta storage help please!

Don't freeze it. You can refrigerate it, wrapped fairly tight. Or you can dry it overnight, which changes the texture when cooked. I have had good success with the refrigerator method. Good Luck and Happy New Year.

Dec 30, 2012
teflontom in Home Cooking

October dining with a one year old

My wife and I are regular visitors, usually once in high season and another visit to attend the Wellfleet oyster fest. Our rental is in Eastham. This year we invited our daughter,son in law and one year old. We're looking for a resto that is OK with a younster that age. We normally are alone so this is going to be a challenge since I realize the choices are going to be limited to begin with.
Of course we want seafood, and can't expect any "high" dining, just looking for family-oriented good seafood within striking distance. Thank in advance for any help.

What to order at Mac's Shack?

If you are staying in Chatham why not try the Impudent Oyster. Always very good. Great Mussles wth chorizo and scallop rolls. We stay in Wellfleet and travel to Chatham just for that reason. Mac's strong point is the sushi. Yes to Blackfish, can't miss. Pearl, the food is mediocre, but a fun place. Arnold's for fried things (clams) and raw clams at the bar.

Shelf Life for Prague Powder Cure 1 & 2

Can anyone inform me on this subject. I have some in my fridge but don't recall exactly when I bought it. I think it is a year old.

May 26, 2012
teflontom in General Topics

Prague powder and all purpose cure

dr, thanks for the info. I've decided to toss the old (they were from '06) and I ordered fresh stuff. I am curoius though, what exactly is the reaction of the slow cure for dry aging vs. the "cooked or smoked cure " other than the fact that the # 1 contains only nitrites and the # 2 contains both nitrites and nitrates in very disparate proportions. My understanding was that when # 1 was smoked or slow cooked that the nitrates became nirites. If you clarify for me I would be very appreciative. I'm no scientist, but I did work as a metallurgist in labs for 25 years. Hope I didn't get off point.

Mar 20, 2012
teflontom in General Topics

Prague powder and all purpose cure

drongo, thanks for your response. I understand the transformation of nitrite to nitrate, but I didn't realize it was exposure to atmosphere. I was under the impression the change had to do with the reaction between proteins and moisture. Either way, I just was wondering if my stored curing salts were still usable. I have a whole bunch and if it is still valid, why buy more? Of course, if I contact the source, I'm sure they'll tell me to throw it away and buy all new....... from them. Hoping there is someone who can speak to the issue of if nitrites and nitrates expire.

Mar 19, 2012
teflontom in General Topics

Prague powder and all purpose cure

ferret, thanks for your response, and yes it makes sense. Maybe I should have asked if nitrates and nitrites become more or less volatile over time. Dry curing can be risky business. Also, am I overthinking the issue?

Mar 19, 2012
teflontom in General Topics

Prague powder and all purpose cure

I came across some cures buried in the bottom of one of my fridges. Question is, does anyone know if they expire? Iknow they are basically salt with nitries or nitrates. Just curious.

Mar 19, 2012
teflontom in General Topics

LOBSTER

bean, if you're not able to put a knife in their head for humane purposes, then dropping them into boiling water is an extremely more painful and tortureous death. The knife method may make you uncomfortable, but is over in a split second. The boiling may make you comfortable because you can put the lid on and look away. Either way, I always put my sea bugs in the freezer about 20 minutes before death. They're brain "falls asleep" and they don't suffer when the time comes. By the way, your concoction looks really good. Amazing what Ritz crackers can do!

Mar 13, 2012
teflontom in Home Cooking

LOBSTER

BB, where in upstate is your friend? I need that info as we never see anything less than $7-8 / lb., and that is rare. Thanks for any info.

Mar 02, 2012
teflontom in Home Cooking

LOBSTER

Wow, where do live that you can get 3-4 dollar lobster? Is that per pound or each? Either way I am moving!

Mar 02, 2012
teflontom in Home Cooking

LOBSTER

Oh, almost forgot. Always save the shells for stock. Throw in some onion, celery, carrot, peppercorns,thyme,bay leaf and dry vermouth, cover it with water and let it simmer for a few hours. Don't waste anything from that precious creature.

Mar 02, 2012
teflontom in Home Cooking

Hot Horseradish

Yes, but depending on the potency, you may want to tread lightly at first. Or perhaps cut it with a mild one. As I stated, try it first. Also, another thought I had is there are regular Canadien dry mustards that can be potent. Try the internet to have some shipped to you. If you mix your own at home, it will be hottest right away and then will mellow as it sits. Personally I don't use Asian mustard for Euro-style sausages as many are mild or spiced specifically (except for maybe the Polish wursts) Italian and spanish, Portugese are very spicy, whereas the French are mild. Therefore I tend to keep my Asian blends for soups, Spring rolls,Banh Mi, etc. Some sources for dry spice on the internet are:

http://www.penzeys.com/
http://www.bulkfoods.com/default.asp
http://www.thespicemerchant.com/cgi-b...

Give it a try and always, taste first.

Appetizer idea needed stat: Room temp or cold, must travel well

How about some stuffed cherry peppers. Make the stuffing with chopped manzanilla olive with garlic and parsley,and perhaps some anchovies. Or a simple platter of provolone cheese with roasted red peppers, pepperoncini, prosciutto, olives,etc.( you get the idea ) served with a baguete style of toasted Italian bread. A deconstruced antipasto, if you will. Keep the olive oil nearby and people can build their own. My experience is gougeres are not very appealing at room temp. Although they can be reheated. They are easy to make. Also there is tapenade. Also, just something as simple as grissini to munch on during cocktails. Good luck.

Mar 02, 2012
teflontom in Home Cooking

Which Types of Restaurants Fascinate You the Most?

Being a true CH, this a tough one, but I will give it a try. I truly cannot say there is one particular style or atmosphere that I always look for. It is more of my mood, that day. I run the gamut from the funky deli to the high end seven course tasting menu. In a mood, give me a Schwartz's medium fat with all the attitude, or Katz's deli with the same. These places have the reputation for rude service, in a way it's funny because you expect it and if you don't get dissed, you feel like you've been dissed.....huh? Or in a different mood, maybe a file gumbo from the Bennigans in NO. (or maybe some boudin from the back country, maybe a gas station) Then, if the wallet allows, maybe a vist to one of Mr. Keller's fine haunts, west or eats coast. A stop to Spain to savor one of Andre Ferria's places. And I can't forget the best seafood on earth, in Cape Cod, Mac's and the Impudent Oyster. You see, it isn't as though you can nail down one particular style, food and service. It is what you are open to experiencing and willing to risk. Yes there will be some letdowns, but you'll never know till you try. For me, the whole package is continuing the tradition of chowhounding.

Mar 01, 2012
teflontom in General Topics

What happened to duck

If you can't locate fresh duck in a market, then don't lose track of that friend. That may be even fresher than the market. Just get a good boning knife and expect to make a mess in your kitchen ( not really too bad ). Oh, and learn how to remove shot from the dead bird. Your hunter friend can help you with that. Not a very glamorous process, but worth it. But honestly, there must be an Asian market somewhere nearby, geez, I live in the Adirondacks in upstate New York and we have a few, not many, choices. Search around, or talk to your local meat guy. Of course if his price gets too high, stick with your hunter friend (offer to pay for his shot and maybe a six pack) Good luck.

Mar 01, 2012
teflontom in General Topics

Any memories of "poor people food" from your childhood that you still crave?

As a very young boy, I recall my visits to my grandmothers kitchen for dinner several times a week. We did not have much and we ate at her house frequently. Her sons, (my father and uncles) had a large raised garden behind the house near a stream with beautiful produce. There was everything from tomatoes, peppers, garlic, (we're Italianas you may have noticed) zucchini,eggplant, squash, basil and oregano. Also there was a chicken pen. Eggs were available as was the bird. My grandmother would make pasta by hand, and bread, everyday. She was the best cook I have ever tasted. And I have eaten from Jean Georges to Sr Andres to Picard,Batali, Laprisse and Keller. And no disrespect to those greats by any means. She would barter with the local farmers for the cow offals in change for her pizzas, calzones sausages, etc. Then every once in a while,she would make what she called "sufriet". It was made up of cow intestine, lung and stomach(tripe), what we today call sweetbreads(pancreas and thymus and brain). At that age, I had no idea what I was eating, but I didn't care. It was the best thing I ever tasted. I have tried to duplicate that stew and have come close, but not quite. I'm not giving up, if it' s the last thing I do. As it turned out she opened a very succesful resturant in our tiny town and taught me all I know about cooking Italian. I hope to pass on those traditions and inspirations to my children and grandchildren. And to the chowhounders who have taken the time to read this. Caio e mangia!

Mar 01, 2012
teflontom in General Topics

who makes the best hot dogs?

I agree with Mr. hotdoglover. Very regional and nearly impossible to sample all the best in one lifetime. That said, I am in upstate NY and have my favorites. In the Western part of the state I like Hoffman's. Centrally I prefer Helmbolds. And to the north (actually into Canada) I always look for Schneiders BIg and juicy ( served at the street festiivals throughout the year, unavaialable in the states, the Montreal version of the NYC dirty dog)) but we manage to get some home. Too many city favorites to mention (pineapple........) Steamed, grilled, fried, sauteed , microwaved, mustard, relish, onions, ketchup, bbq, sauerkraut, chili, cheese, hell, I've had them with avocado,(never again) it is the perfect food. It is the sausge king.

Mar 01, 2012
teflontom in General Topics

What happened to duck

I may be a late comer to the OP, but I would suggest stopping into a busy Asian market and buying a whole fresh duck and cutting it up yourself. You will be amazed at what a giving creature it is. Legs for confit. Breasts for quick seared. Fat for everything (forget olive oil) and bones for stock.
Keep and freeze the livers until you have enough to make a terrine. Forget the frozen stuff, be adventerous and go for it. You'll be glad you did.

Mar 01, 2012
teflontom in General Topics

To confit or not to confit. Is this duck leg safe to eat?

I agree with bbb, give it a sniff test. If there is any off-odor, toss it. Do not take a chance, trust your senses.

Mar 01, 2012
teflontom in General Topics

Can You Recall A Taste?

This is a great topic. Years ago I went to school for flavor evaluation and analysis as part of my profession. What we learned was that we may consciously lose our memory of a particular taste or aroma, but subconsciously we never do. All that is needed is perhaps an odor, say, of a musty cellar from your grand parents cellar, combined with the smell of a pot roast on the stove. Or the smell of my Italian grandmothers restaurant kitchen with the rosemary chicken and potaoes in the oven while floors were being mopped with spic & span. Sounds crazy but..... This will bring it rushing back to you. Our olfactory senses play a large role in our taste memories. I have tried for years to recapture those classic flavors, and aromas (not so much the must or cleaning fluids.). Some successful, some not so much. Maybe it's like "there's nothin' like the fist time" or "you can never go back". But we try. That's why we're Chowhounders. Always looking forward, but never losing the past. Never stop hounding!

Mar 01, 2012
teflontom in General Topics

Hot Horseradish

EvilB, Find an authentic asian food store. They will have jarred (already mixed ) or you can buy powder form and mix your own. Just add water and some rice wine vinegar ( or whatever spices you desire). But be warned, these can take the top of your head off. Experiment first. Keep in mind the French (maille) are not very interested in hot and spicy. Think Asian, Indian or South African for mustards.

LOBSTER

glebe, there is no wrong way to cook a lobster as long as it is fresh. Boiling is the easiest, steaming can get a little fussy if you start searching for seaweed as a bed. grilling and broiling require a deft hand at killing/splitting the bug. Anyway is great, just don't overcook it.

Mar 01, 2012
teflontom in Home Cooking

Hot Horseradish

p-bird, another response to one of your inquiries. Horseradish is obvoiusly best fresh, so as I resonded to your canned tomaoes question, grow your own. Plant it in the fall and pull it in the spring. It will be the first greens you see sprouting through the last bit of snow. Don't let it grow into carrot size as it will lose it's potency. Most importantly, after gently removing the plant, keep the green top and a small piece of the root attached to it. Plug that back into the ground leaving just the greens exposed. It will grow again and in the late summer /early fall you will have another harvest. Then again in thte fall. But be warned, horseradish can take over a whole garden or even a large yard. Keep an eye on it.

Alternatively, there is a brand we have here in upstate New York which is called Junius. It is only available frozen in a soup can size. I'm not certain if you can get it where you are. If you can I would recommend it.

Keep in mind when storing horseradish, light is the enemy. If you put it in clear jar, wrap the jar with foil. The less light exposure, the longer it will stay potent.

Where to find non-BPA canned or jarred or boxed tomatoes?

Any can, whether it is steel or aluminum is lined with epoxy of some type or another to various degrees. Depending on the food, fruit , beverage being put in the can dictates the type and amount which is used. Very simply, the higher the acid of the contents the higher the use of the coating inside the can. Tomatoes, which are a friut and very high in acid need heavier linings Without this lining the acid would eat through the metal within 5 days. I have worked in the metal container industry for for over 30 years in the labaroatory testing exactly the linings/internal coatings you speak of. Without getting scientific, it is virtualy impossible to line the inside of a can without using an epoxy.

Stick to your original thought, plant a garden and can or freeze the tomatoes. That's what I do, and stay away from high-acid canned foods. It can be risky.

Have Food Magazines Lost It?

Hooray! My sentiments exactly. BA and F&W have become the Wine Spectator of food mags. Gwyneth Paltrow? On the cover? As the feature for the month? Please. The last BA seemed to be obsessed with LA (of course) and Copenhagen. Huh? They have gone the way of food tv, self absorbed and pretentious. Anyway, great article.

Feb 22, 2012
teflontom in Features

Cookbook 101: List Some Fundamental Cookbooks (Suggestions Needed)

If you are looking for " fundamental " cook books, then I recommend starting with Pepin's classics La Tecnique and La Methode. They are great for building an understanding of how to prepare and then develop the dish. These are are not so much about follwing an exacting recipe (except for pastry) as they are for gaining knowledge, experience and confidence. As an afterthought, for baking and pastry King Atrhur Flour has great books,
(shhh! many of their recipes are available online) Next , of course is "Mastering", another classic. Next is The Way to Cook, How toCook Everthing, Anything from Beard. From there I would go with The Whole Beast/Fergus Henderson. And of course when you begin to venture into many ethnic varieties the options are endless. But first learn the basics, techniqus and methods. Cookbooks are not Bibles, they are both a general guide and inspiration. Make the food you cook your own.

Feb 01, 2012
teflontom in Home Cooking