maria lorraine's Profile

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Making yogurt without using commercial yogurt or starter

That's also the standard for France, Spain and Switzerland. Switzerland additionally requires a minimum number of bacteria:

Article 56: The final product must contain a total of at least 10 million colony forming units of microorganisms under paragraph 1 or 1.2 per gram.

about 11 hours ago
maria lorraine in Home Cooking

Making yogurt without using commercial yogurt or starter

Yogurt is defined, scientifically, and also by the FDA. This is so a product can legitimately be considered yogurt, not simply a coagulated milk product or a product cultured with non-yogurt bacteria. The definition of yogurt also excludes thickened "pudding-like" mixtures made of non-dairy ingredients.

The definition of yogurt includes specific bacteria that yogurt must have. Other bacteria may be present, but those two specific bacteria must be used for the product to be considered yogurt.

Here is the CFR - Code of Federal Regulations Title 21 -- for yogurt:

PART 131 -- MILK AND CREAM

Subpart B--Requirements for Specific Standardized Milk and Cream

Sec. 131.200 Yogurt.

(a) Description. Yogurt is the food produced by culturing one or more of the optional dairy ingredients specified in paragraph (c) of this section with a characterizing bacterial culture that contains the lactic acid-producing bacteria, Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus.

http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts...

...

This is not to say that some very interesting yogurt-like concoctions are not being made, and that those might even be tasty, only to say that they aren't yogurt if they are not made with specific yogurt cultures.

And while peanuts, almonds, soybeans -- and the "milks" they produce, might produce a yogurt-like product, they aren't yogurt per se because of the lack of dairy. Might be very tasty, just not yogurt.

about 18 hours ago
maria lorraine in Home Cooking

No-knead bread... problem with 2nd rise...help!

Or linen, used to line banetton.

Aug 13, 2014
maria lorraine in Home Cooking

No-knead bread... problem with 2nd rise...help!

Here is the complete set of articles and master recipe for
No-Knead Bread:

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/9764...

Aug 13, 2014
maria lorraine in Home Cooking
1

No-knead bread... problem with 2nd rise...help!

As I mentioned in an earlier post in this thread, I found the towel didn't work either. The first time I made the Bittman-Lahey-Sullivan recipe, the dough stuck to the towel but the towel might not have been impregnated with enough flour. In any case, I abandoned the towel idea, and now use parchment paper the easiest) just like chowser, above. A dough scraper really helps to fold the dough.

It's just the first couple of times making the dough/bread that it's difficult. After that, it's a snap and becomes routine. Good luck, zanbuell.

Aug 13, 2014
maria lorraine in Home Cooking

Sciacchetrà pairing suggestions?

Something simple served after the meal, like almond biscotti.

Like all dessert wines, what you pair with the Sciacchetrà should be less sweet than the wine itself, or the wine will taste sour.

Aug 12, 2014
maria lorraine in Wine

Suggestions for light lunch/picnic provisions in Sebastapol/Northern Santa Rosa

Coming from Bodega Bay going inland on the Bodega Highway, I'd not miss the chance to stop by Wild Flour Bakery in Freestone for fresh bread and other treats for a picnic. Also, further inland on that same road, Bill's Farm Basket at 10315 Bodega Hwy, Sebastopol, CA 95472, (707) 829-1777. That same road will lead you into Sebastopol, where I most often fill out a picnic basket with deli and cheese selections from Whole Foods.

Aug 11, 2014
maria lorraine in San Francisco Bay Area

Anyone ever had garlic turn blue-green while cooking?

No, eggplant turns blue for a different reason.

The purple color of eggplant's skin is due to anthocyanin, which also is the reason for the purple color in red cabbage. That purple anthocyanin turns blue or green when alkaline ingredients like baking soda or baking powder are added to the dish or to the sauce. The color change, if not immediate, is probably due to the eggplant sitting overnight with the alkaline ingredients.

What was your exact recipe and procedure for your eggplant dish?

If it tastes OK to you, and you want to eat it, it won't hurt you, but I understand being skeeved by off-colors.

Aug 10, 2014
maria lorraine in General Topics

Is "natural wine" a fad?

The definition of natural (or the lack of definition) isn't the only issue. Organic wine is defined differently in Europe, the USA and Australia.
http://www.winespectator.com/webfeatu...

In Europe and Australia, organic wine (meaning, wine made from organically grown grapes and also vinified organically)CAN contain added sulfites.

Added sulfites are not allowed in the US organic wine:
http://www.connexionfrance.com/organi...
https://www.organicwine.com.au/wine-p...
http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getfi...

So when referring to organic wine, you have to specify its location, since the meaning changes from continent to continent.

Aug 09, 2014
maria lorraine in Wine
1

Is "natural wine" a fad?

Welcome to Chowhound. I realize this is your first post.

<<And it’s great that they are getting a little bubble of attention, but painful to watch this always come down to "well what are the rules and criteria".>>

What you deem as painful and unfortunate is, however, necessary to accurately describe the wine to the consumer. So the consumer knows what he's buying.

"Natural" can refer to wine made with minimal intervention, or to wine made with organically grown grapes but not vinified organically, or to wine made from organically grown grapes and also vinified organically, or to wine made from grapes grown biodynamically and vinified traditionally, or to wine from grapes grown sustainably but vinified traditionally, or to a whole variety of other permutations and combinations.

The term "natural" can also mean absolutely nothing in regards to organic or biodynamic or sustainable practices or even minimal intervention and is instead deceptively used by marketers to get the customer to think the wine is made using those methods but really isn't.

At least that's the way it is in the US.

So "natural" needs to be defined in more precise terms so the consumer knows what's happened to the fruit and liquid in the bottle.

And how what has happened to the fruit and liquid affects the final flavor and ageability of the wine. For example, a wine made from organically grown grapes and vinified traditionally has a very different flavor and shelf life from a wine made from organically grown grapes and also vinified organically.

"Natural" is defined in Europe by some organizations (not the DOCs or AOCs), but isn't in the US. It's not even precisely defined on the Jenny and Francois website, and they even allude to that at the link you have given. I presume, though, that because J&F are importers, they are most likely referring to natural wines from Europe.

Even in France, with its strong natural/biologique/biodynamic/organic movement, 90% of wines there were found to have pesticides in them. So, perhaps deception is an issue there also:
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/891287
http://www.decanter.com/news/wine-new...

From what I've heard inside the US wine industry, the controversy and annoyance with the term natural has to do with its lack of precise definition (not communicating anything) and its use to deceive consumers, not because natural describes winemaking practices that aren't "traditional." That's a critical difference.

<<But it would be nice to see the wines in a few more places and not have to travel as far for a glass in a restaurant or bottle off the shelf. >>

You do know that many wines are made using "natural" practices or from organic grapes but that info is never on the label, right? And that some wines are also vinified organically, but that is never on the label either? There's a growing trend towards non-certification because of all the paperwork headaches and the lack of flexibility in bad weather.

<<A way of simplifying the bigger picture of wines that were farmed and produced differently than what was readily available in most restaurants and retail stores.>>

"Readily available" at retail stores changes depending upon location. Does that mean wine made in Modesto found at Walgreens nationwide? Or wine from wine merchants? Again, more precise use of language aids in understanding what is really meant.

Here are some other Chowhound posts on "natural" wines:

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/966605
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/579103
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/826544

Aug 09, 2014
maria lorraine in Wine
1

Thai Red Curry help please.

I've been searching and searching for a great red curry recipe. The pre-made pastes I've tried are not blowing up my skirt.

I want to make the paste from scratch.

Any leads on recipes, or links, or a cut-and-paste you can do?

Would surely appreciate it.

Aug 08, 2014
maria lorraine in Home Cooking

Success! Homemade “Fage” Yogurt! Easy! Cheap!

Here is a wonderful article on making homemade yogurt with lots of good info, tips, history and science. Enjoyable read.

DIY Yogurt Beats The Store-Bought Stuff
http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifesty...

Aug 08, 2014
maria lorraine in Home Cooking

Sulfite free wines

Make sure you get the IgE-based testing.

Like many "food sensitivity" tests, the LEAP MRT test is on the Quackwatch list, and being investigated by the FDA for inaccurate diagnostic claims.

These tests dupe the consumer with aggressive marketing that contains inflated accuracy claims made out to be scientific ones.

Read more here about the inaccurate claims of "food sensitivity" tests:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20...

Clinical Nutrition Insight published an article about the inaccuracy of the tests. You can read a portion of that article here:

http://bit.ly/13fmiRM

I wish you well in feeling better, and hope you will get better information as to what is causing your symptoms. It could be that something, or several things, other than sulfites, are causing those symptoms.

Aug 08, 2014
maria lorraine in Wine
1

NAPA/SONOMA :: 1 Day Trip

More thoughts on focusing on Yountville and just north to Oakville, where Mondavi is.

Oakville: Were it me, and I wanted to learn about wine, I would take the Mondavi tour to start the day, but I'd probably pay extra for the Reserve tasting. Staying in Oakville, I'd head over to Saddleback Cellars, on Money Road off Oakville Crossroad (wonderful wine by Nils Venge) and pick up provisions (maybe beforehand) for lunch at Oakville Grocery (iconic Coca-Cola sign). If I really wanted to see one of the most beautiful wineries in America and to taste world-class wine, I'd visit Far Niente. If not Far Niente, then their pretty sister winery, Nickel & Nickel, which features a bevy of single-vineyard Chardonnays and Cabernets. Cardinale is another good option in that neck of the woods. All located within 1-2 miles of each other in Oakville.

Yountville: Even if you did the tour at Mondavi in Oakville first, right after you could drive the short 3-mile hop south on Highway 29 to Yountville, and focus the rest of your visit there. You could visit Dominus Winery, which makes Euro-style swill, and has one of the most amazing buildings in the entire Napa Valley. Or, Cliff Lede on Yountville Cross Road (amazing building with good art and wine). Or, Goosecross Cellars on State Lane, just off Yountville Cross Road, for legendary Chardonnay. If you decided to eat in Yountville, the lunch and dinner options are plentiful, and all covered on the SF board. For delicious and higher-priced wines, I'd visit Gemstone, Kapscandy and Keever. The Ma(i)sonry on Washington Street has an arty-elegant tasting room that features a lot of prized boutique wines (I love the ones by Aaron Pott), and is open later than most tasting rooms. It's a wonderful setting. I'd probably do Domaine Chandon at the end of the day, right there in Yountville, since it's also open later than most wineries, unless you had your heart set on having bubbles to start the day, in which case I'd do that. Since Domaine Chandon is next door to the Napa Valley Museum, which right now has a great Wayne Thiebaud show through September 14th, I might stroll through the secret gate that connects the two properties and do that too. Everything listed here is within 3 miles of one another.

Finally, I'd have dinner in Yountville (Redd, Redd Wood, Ciccio for the cacio de pepe pasta, Bistro Jeanty, Ad Hoc, etc.), or wherever you are, to sober up and avoid the rush-hour traffic before heading back into SF.

Aug 08, 2014
maria lorraine in San Francisco Bay Area

NAPA/SONOMA :: 1 Day Trip

Agree on Boon Fly. I've always had good meals there.

Both Napa Valley and Sonoma County are easily doable on a day's visit. It's just a turn off a major thoroughfare in Napa Valley to get to the side roads or back roads. If you look at a map, you see that the layout of Napa Valley's roads is essentially a ladder with rungs. See photo.

The two major thoroughfares are the sides of the ladder, the rungs the sideroads. Very easy to navigate. Smaller roads off the sideroads. Wonderful to explore, just like Sonoma County, which I also love.

Map from Sanda Kaufman at urban.csuohio.edu
and also found at
http://www.mappery.com/map-of/Napa-Va...

The great agricultural vastness of Napa Valley begins around Yountville, north of the city of Napa. That's where the valley really opens up to green lushness, especially this time of year. I love the Carneros region also, as mentioned in an earlier post. Spring Mountain is a great area to taste and explore. Probably best to focus on one region and taste there.

Access to northern Sonoma County (not the city of Sonoma proper) via a straight shot north up Highway 101 is probably easier on a one-day visit. I love both the Dry Creek Valley region (Zinfandels) and the Westside Road (Russian River Valley region, near Healdsburg) for beauty and wineries.

Again, choose one region and make that your focus. You could also choose subregions like the area around Forestville or Sebastopol, or any number of other regions, where you can select wineries and an option for lunch.

The maps again for northern Sonoma County are here:
http://www.wineroad.com/maps/

Here are some suggested tasting routes:
http://www.sonomawine.com/visit-our-w...

Aug 08, 2014
maria lorraine in San Francisco Bay Area

Dessert Italian Style

???

Aug 07, 2014
maria lorraine in Home Cooking

Simple Tuscan winery tours near Florence, Italy?

What zin1953 said.

Ask the wineries when you contact them to schedule an appointment. Be sure to explain the size of your group and your already planned-itinerary.

Be advised that some tour guides (not only in Italy, but everywhere) receive kickbacks for recommending you to to certain (IMO, lesser quality) wineries, and you will want to steer clear of those operators.

Also, do some digging on the travel boards, like Rick Steves travel forum, Trip Advisor, etc.

For example:
http://www.tuscanwinetours.net/
http://www.tripadvisor.com/Travel-g18...

Aug 07, 2014
maria lorraine in Wine

NAPA/SONOMA :: 1 Day Trip

Agree with other posters that it's best to concentrate on a single region for tasting, one region in the vast Sonoma County or a subregion (AVA) in Napa Valley.

One fairly recent thread that offered a great day of activities is this one that discussed the Carneros region, which straddles the southern end of both Napa and Sonoma. In that region, you'll find good wineries (mainly producing Pinot Noir and Chardonnay and bubbles), a great art museum, Fremont Dinner, Boonfly for lunch, and stunning backroads.

Read the thread here:

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/837875

What this thread does is plan a day in a single region and let that be the focus. Your focus doesn't have to be Carneros -- it could be another region entirely -- but choosing one region is a a good way to make your day less stressful and cut down on driving. Have a great time. Drive safely.

Aug 06, 2014
maria lorraine in San Francisco Bay Area

NAPA/SONOMA :: 1 Day Trip

I love the tours at Domaine Chandon and Mondavi. In the industry here in Napa Valley, those two tours are known to be excellent, especially if you'd like to learn how wine is made. Starting the day off with bubbles sounds like fun, and those two wineries are close together. Chandon is right in Yountville, full of lunch options. Be sure to eat a hearty breakfast, and plan a picnic or solid reservation for lunch.

Aug 06, 2014
maria lorraine in San Francisco Bay Area

NAPA/SONOMA :: 1 Day Trip

I can think of only a few wineries on Highway 12 north of Glen Ellen, going all the way into Santa Rosa, and I don't consider it a goldmine for quality wineries. Just a couple that I can recommend, and I think another area would be a better choice for exploration.

Glen Ellen does offer several good options for wineries and tasting rooms.

Aug 06, 2014
maria lorraine in San Francisco Bay Area

NAPA/SONOMA :: 1 Day Trip

I agree with visiting wineroad.com and checking the tab called Maps. However, if one is tempted to describe the entire Napa Vally as touristy, that tells me a visit to the huge number of backroads is in order, where all tourism falls away and it's just as rustic as Sonoma County. You could never call the backroads of the Carneros region touristy, for example. Though I agree that the main thoroughfares of Highway 29 and Silverado can be touristy. But you can't characterize an agricultural region by driving the highways.

Aug 06, 2014
maria lorraine in San Francisco Bay Area

Simple Tuscan winery tours near Florence, Italy?

Thanks! I love the property and garden at Badia, just not as impressed with the wines and olive oil as at other places.

Aug 06, 2014
maria lorraine in Wine

Simple Tuscan winery tours near Florence, Italy?

Florence is just north of the famous Chianti Classico region in Tuscany, where I have traveled frequently.

One of the greatest wineries in all of Italy is Fontodi, in Panzano, about 40 km south of Florence. Their Flaccianello is a truly great wine, with an international reputation for excellence. But everything Fontodi makes is good.

Also visit Felsina, also near in Castelnuovo Berardenga. Their Fontalloro is wonderful.

My favorite little town near Florence is Radda, where you can find a bite to eat, and the Castello di Volpaia, in a little village. Wonderful wine, especially the Riservas.

I love Castello di Ama in Gaiole in Chianti and have stayed there several times. Great wines.

Also close is the town of Castellina, where you'll fine the winery Castellare di Castellina and Castello di Fonterutoli.

Closest to Florence, only 14 km away, is the town of Grassina, where you'll find one of the Ruffino estates, Poggio Casciano. That alone would be a perfectly fine visit.

Though I adore Montelpulciano and especially Montalcino, and have been there many times, both towns are farther south and might be too far for a day trip in and out of Florence.

You will have to arrange visits with appointments, easily done via email and a nice note.

Aug 05, 2014
maria lorraine in Wine
3

Making yogurt without using commercial yogurt or starter

Sorry. I don't know.

Aug 05, 2014
maria lorraine in Home Cooking

Wine vinegars

Agreed. I'd dilute your too-strong vinegar with verjus or a compatible juice, or with clam/fish/shellfish broth (bouillon) before I'd add another vinegar.

Aug 04, 2014
maria lorraine in Wine

Good non-toxic, grain-free things for a puppy who is teething to chew on?

<<We just can't get enough penises.>>

Oh yes. Also called "Bully Sticks."

Aug 03, 2014
maria lorraine in Not About Food

Dessert Italian Style

Cannoli with chocolate chips and chopped pistachios
gelato (get special cold packs to hold till service)
zabaglione with summer berries
biscotti, homemade
torta alla mandorle
Serpentone

Aug 01, 2014
maria lorraine in Home Cooking

An Open Letter to Chowhound re: the new format

I get that you don't care.

The issue isn't about the heart, or only about the heart.

It's about design decisions that are ill-informed or seem chosen without insight, and how those design decisions affect users and site owners.

If the site designers had cared more and had more insight, all this discussion never would have ensued.

Jul 31, 2014
maria lorraine in Site Talk
1

Wine in Hungary and the Czech Republic

Write the winery here. See if they can help you.
They might have a sales rep who can arrange this:

Sonberk a.s.
Sonberk 393
691 27 Popice
Tel: +420 777 630 434
E-mail: sonberk@sonberk.cz

Jul 31, 2014
maria lorraine in Wine

An Open Letter to Chowhound re: the new format

Yes, this is what I meant.

"Girlish" meaning naïve, without discernment in adult matters.
What you don't want when you recommend a post.

Girlish isn't always used pejoratively; it can be positive, meaning youthful and feminine, especially when the context (again, context!) is in reference to a woman older than a girl. My use of girlish describes the tendency of young girls to dot i's and brandish many surfaces, papers, drawings, etc., with cutesy hearts.

The use of boyish seems almost always affectionate, as in "boyish grin."

Jul 31, 2014
maria lorraine in Site Talk