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Disappointed by LE FOODING these days. And you?

" However the main requirement was that they had to be "Fooding", i.e. trendy and modern without being stuffy. Places that were too "haute cuisine" or a little bourgeois at the edges were eliminated, but the places that were too "proletarian" i.e. real popular bistrots were not suitable either (too "France d'en bas", a formulation that the French speakers among us will understand). The place had to include all the markers of the affluent young urban bourgeoisie "

A nice little summary of why I found it a horrid little rag. Which is not so say that it isn't useful. But so profoundly petit bourgeois, bobo above all else.

Jul 21, 2014
tmso in France

French food - boring? Yes, according to the Daily Telegraph

There's a good reason crumbles have spread across the channel!

Jul 21, 2014
tmso in France

Using a Credit-card .. at Bistro/boulangerie or patisserie

No, you will need cash.

Jul 02, 2014
tmso in France

Oakland: La Costa at 36th and E 14th

How is it these days? I'll be back in town this summer, and I was wondering if my favorite ceviche place is still good.

Jul 01, 2014
tmso in San Francisco Bay Area

East Bay BBQ (and Fried Chicken): Brookfield Food Center in Oakland

It must be hit-and-miss. When I've been there, the meats were plenty salty and the beans weren't burnt. Generally good, tangy and smoky, in the Flint's style. I wouldn't cross the city for it, but if you're in East Oakland, it's very good when I've been there (twice, in 2013).

Jul 01, 2014
tmso in San Francisco Bay Area

World Cup Watching Venues

Si, but I disagree with the word géant as well. It's a pretty large screen. Not that large of a place, and not that large of a screen. It is clear that the mairie does not want big football parties, and we're still not getting them.

Jul 01, 2014
tmso in France

World Cup Watching Venues

"giant"

Jul 01, 2014
tmso in France

What edibles or food related items do you bring home from a visit to Paris?

They are a sort of pain d'épices.

Jun 26, 2014
tmso in France

what do Germans eat?

I think it's more likely that dishwashers make eating off of plates a little more practical than it was in the past. In any case, I can confirm that those little boards are still used, and still used for breakfast. Really, they are used for small bread-based meals, so breakfast and "evening bread" dinners. It is a little old-fashioned and informal, but not just for old people.

Jun 26, 2014
tmso in General Topics

Markets of Paris - the book

The Sunday Marché Bastille has also gotten just very over-crowded with N. American tourists over the last few years. Before 10h it's okay, but after that they start to become overwhelming and get in the way of the functioning of the market (something where the Japanese are much better). A cousin with a strong American accent has mostly stopped going there, as the vendors often ignore her, assuming she's not actually shopping.

Aligre would be much more appropriate for tourism, if only, as you said, because it is open 6 days.

Jun 20, 2014
tmso in France

Overwhelmed with Too Much Research!

The 86 would be a wonderful bus for the OP.

Jun 20, 2014
tmso in France

World Cup Watching Venues

In the meantime, all the neighborhood places that show rugby and football games, show the world cup games. We can go to them, hope that France makes it to the quarter finals, and be jealous of nos cousins germains: http://popupcity.net/wp-content/uploa...

Jun 18, 2014
tmso in France

Corkage in France

I would love to see the ensuing spectacle when an Australian tries to explain to the Maghrebin owner of a Halal restaurant that his establishment is really Haram. Please film this, if you ever do so.

One final thing before I shut up, because this thread is going nowhere. Of course you cannot drink wine in a halal restaurant in Arabia or Yemen, it would be haram. This does not mean that the same is true in Tunisia or Morocco. The world is large and traditions vary widely. The one about halal restaurants being one of the few places in France where BYOB is a thing, I thought interesting enough to share. Sorry I did.

Jun 18, 2014
tmso in France
1

Corkage in France

Go argue with an Imam if you want, I'm simply describing the reality as it exists here.

Jun 17, 2014
tmso in France
3

Corkage in France

No, it's certainly a question of tradition, and that is what I was trying to get at, in the context of a discussion of bringing your own wine to a restaurant. The establishment is Halal, they do not serve non-Halal food, and do not serve alcohol. They may well provide glasses for you to pour your own wine into. I'm sure there are plenty of countries where this is not done, but in France, this is a perfectly ordinary thing for a Halal restaurant to do.

There are of course restaurants that use Halal meats, but also sell beer and wine. This is not what I was talking about, and I would not suggest trying to bring your own bottle into one.

Jun 17, 2014
tmso in France
2

How to cut cheese

I would go so far as to say the illustration for brie is pretty far along the way to "wrong". It might be even worse than just chopping off the tip, in that it looks like someone is trying to pretend they're cutting it in slices but just wanted the whole tip alone.

This page has pictures of the more normal way to do it: http://www.loupastorel.com/pages/tout...

Jun 17, 2014
tmso in France

Corkage in France

There are many different traditions across the world. France, being a mediterranean country, has many muslims from countries where Halal tradition does not require non-muslims in the restaurant to abstain from wine, as long as the observant muslims are not the ones serving it. I'm not sure what's so difficult to understand here.

Jun 17, 2014
tmso in France

Corkage in France

This is a long tradition in Mediterranean countries where different religious groups have a long history of coexistence.

Jun 16, 2014
tmso in France

Another Reason to Feel Lucky Being in France

There's a legal requirement that something non-alcoholic is less expensive than beer, so you often find water priced at beer minus 10% or so.

(I wonder if that varies from Land to Land, though)

Jun 11, 2014
tmso in France

Another Reason to Feel Lucky Being in France

You can always ask for Leitungswasser, and you won't be charged for it. The request is relatively unusual, though, as most people in Germany prefer sparkling water.

However when in Germany, I'm usually too happy to have good beer for not much more than the cost of water.

Jun 10, 2014
tmso in France

Escargot

You can buy tubes of pre-prepared beurre persillé (at Picard, for example). Whether you should or not, I'll leave for you to decide.

Jun 10, 2014
tmso in France
1

Corkage in France

Since this thread went this long without it being mentioned, I'll add my piece: one situation where BYOB is completely normal is at Halal establishments. Many restaurants are happy to serve wine, but for those who are not, it is a good idea to ask if you can bring your own. I've never been charged a corkage, and had some very enjoyable 20€ bottles with couscous and grillades.

Jun 10, 2014
tmso in France
1

Escargot

A la catalane, à l'espagnole, cargolade, en aioli, en ragout aux tomates et fenouil, ... I'm getting hungry

Jun 06, 2014
tmso in France
1

Pesky Yankees, cut the volume, please!

There are always some people who just never learned to control their voices. It seems like French men and American women are especially prone to this.

For the rest, I agree with you fully. Smiling and asking nicely works very well with French people, unless there's no hope, in which case it does no harm. For Americans and Canadians, I try asking nicely, then if they want to entangle me in their conversation ("Oh sorry. Did you know I'm Canadian? Look, a maple leaf! So I was asking my doctor about this spot..."), I don't hesitate to be just plain rude. It works. Genre, "I'm not interested in your life, please just let us dine in peace". I'm sure it ruins their night, but better theirs than mine.

Jun 05, 2014
tmso in France

Eating hamburgers and frites with your mitts or utensils; a cultural difference?

You might be (sort of) joking, but you're right. Eating with one's hands or off the knife is indeed something you would almost never see from a right-winger. Unless they're of the Americanophile Sarkozist variety, in which case it would be a mark of cosmopolitanism to eat American foods the American way.

Jun 03, 2014
tmso in France

Two grocery items I cannot find in France

I have a list of chiles and spices as long as my arm, which I bring back to France from the US. But this is probably particular to those who lived in the SW, and would be just as true if I lived in the other 3/4 of the US.

May 05, 2014
tmso in France

Two grocery items I cannot find in France

30-45 minutes in an autocuiseur, if you don't care about reducing the volume. That is easy enough that I always have fresh broth.

May 05, 2014
tmso in France

French Service Anecdote - Any Others?

Then you should enjoy andouillette!

Apr 28, 2014
tmso in France

Croque Monsieur in Paris

In the same way that the US fell in love with onion soup, Germany fell in love with the croque. The best restaurant made croques I've had have been in Berlin and Hamburg, where you'll find sandwich shops that specialize in them.

Le Terminus at Nation makes them fresh, but is not any kind of a destination; only go there if you find yourself already at Nation.

Apr 16, 2014
tmso in France

Report from my stay in Paris – and the much-debated overnight in Fontainebleau

One can only guess at how aweful those Italians living in Paris are, who refer to "prosciutto di Parigi" or "cotto di Parigi". I must admit, to my deep shame, that I use those very terms when speaking Italian.

(More seriously, I find "crudo de Bayonne" a charming linguistic wreck).

Mar 26, 2014
tmso in France