PotShard's Profile

Title Last Reply

Decent looking steak platters...Please.

Sorry, Kaleo for not responding to your suggestion. Have been away from Chow,...so I missed your good comments. I didn't know you could still find the old Buffalo oval platters. Haven't seen them for some time. The were quite heavy. We don't really care for Fiestaware though, even though it has been intensely popular for many years. I had a friend in WA who scrounged every garage & estate sale for every piece of old Fiesta that she could find.

Thanks, for your comments. Please excuse my belated reply....

Feb 17, 2014
PotShard in Cookware

Decent looking steak platters...Please.

Hoping to find decent-looking steak plates....

Our primary serving dishware is all Revol. But we also grill a LOT, and I prefer "earthier presentations" for grilled chix, chops & steaks. Still want to use the white porcelain for the rest of the meal though.

The "Steak plates/platters" I have found look sooo Fast Food/El Cheapo. Am hoping to find something that helps keep rare steaks somewhat warm over multiple dinner convos. And yet doesn't look like it came from a chain steakhouse.

Any ideas......?

Thanks.

Feb 12, 2014
PotShard in Cookware

100% grass fed beef. Icky! Am I crazy?

It's sad, that the general public, are forced into buying the Con Agra mass-produced/slaughtered-quick-turn-around meat in the US. There are not likely any expectations from any other meat offered in the US.? The "green" grass-fed boeuf is exactly that. Pun intended. Any form of consumer-end meat quality is not likely gonna be good in good ol' America?

Not that easy to distinguish between good and bad, grass-fed and corn-fed, if no one in the conglomerate system gives a rat's patootie? Fast, cheap, and easy...that's what we all get, unless we made grew it ourselves?

I grew up on ranches. My family had a small cow-calf operation, as breeding good horses was our main focus.

As other "in-touch-people" who have lived outside the supermarket,... have already suggested: Good beef is a matter of genetics, and many, many... other factors.

Genetics DO count. As does the slaughtering, hanging/aging. As does the feeding/finishing of the Boeuf Something, which you are not likely to taste in your local Mega-Mart.

Dec 29, 2009
PotShard in General Topics

Can anyone recommend a good soy sauce?

I still like Kikkoman... but NADDAH made in the US. Read the label closely. JAPANESE-produced soy sauce is very good. The US stuff is total crappe. JUNK. We buy our SS at an area oriental market, as the Big-Box-type of grocery chains sell only inferior "oriental seasonings". Kikkoman Extra Fancy Whole Beans Soy Sauce from Japan is excellent.

Dec 29, 2009
PotShard in General Topics

Frozen Squid. What if I only want PART of the box?

Andrew... Sounds like you have a good idea there. May be a little aromatic in the beginning,..but my primary concern is all about the future quality of the "remaining" squid that I shove back into the freezer. I, too, am concerned about the toughness of the squid, if they are cooked and re-frozen. I do have a big, weighty, rubber mallet .....hmmmm.
Innovative solution. Thanks.

Dec 29, 2009
PotShard in General Topics

Is sea urchin supposed to taste like poison?

From a general gathering of opinions posted here,... it appears that sea urchin ISN'T fit to eat. I grew up on the Oregon coast. We ate everything that swam, crawled the ocean floor, and clung to the rocks. EXCEPT sea urchin. My dad had a great laugh when I tried it a couple times... freshly plucked from the Pacific intertidal zones. Sea urchin AIN'T fit to eat,...even if fresh! An acquired taste, in me book.....

Dec 29, 2009
PotShard in General Topics

Frozen Squid. What if I only want PART of the box?

Thanks for the comments. I kinda like the throw-it-at-your-floor routine. Good way to take out my frustrations. Our floors are all porcelain tile, that would no doubt take the "whammo". But the three dawgs may never come in the kitchen again? And,..the "glass-breaker" security devices might go hog wild?

With any kind of fish/shellfish... I also do not think it is wise to re-freeze even partially-thawed packages.

The Ginzou knife looks like it might work? Done with the "lay" of the squid, it might not mutilate too many critters.

There is a fair amount of water between the squid. They appear to be a little "glazed" before freezing (I assume to help prevent freezer burn... and make extra sheckles?). Soooo...don't know if a hammer and chisel will work, but I may have to resort to this.

Has anyone ever cooked the remaining, prepped/cleaned, critters... then... try re-freezing the lot? I have parboiled fresh crabs and lobsters with success. Possible with frozen squid??

Dec 29, 2009
PotShard in General Topics

Frozen Squid. What if I only want PART of the box?

We love squid...but can only buy it in area oriental markets in 3 pound boxes, frozen. If I thaw the entire box, we end up with too much squid. Years ago, I used to ask store meat cutters to buzz saw the boxes in half, length wise, following the "lay" of the squid in the box. Not much loss, and this worked well, keeping all frozen. No one wants to do that anymore, sigh. Can I thaw, prepare & cook ALL of the box,..then freeze? Any ideas for dealing with smaller portions of squid from the frozen boxes?

Dec 29, 2009
PotShard in General Topics

Zion National Park - any suggestions?

Try planning your trip to go on to Bryce Canyon, and/or the Grand Canyon. Bryce is not far from Zion, under 50 miles. If you think Zion is worth looking at...Go the extra distance and see Bryce. Both parks are different, and well worth seeing. Go to Zion first,..then Bryce. We stayed in Kanab, UT last fall (I won't go anywhere in the "high country" until me can do it in my Drop Top (convertible)....to tour the whole area. Yes, it may be cold in April. We thought the Rocking V Cafe in Kanab was worthy of going back to. A bit pretentious, and the decor is shabby, but the food was good. They had a wine selection (didn't look for the hard liquor selection).

Mar 06, 2009
PotShard in Mountain States

What makes a good clam pizza?

Me don't want to BUY it, Me wants to MAKE it. Never though of making a clam pizza. Just guessing,...I think that small whole, fresh, un-opened clams, added to a partially-baked crust could be very good. Some of the liquid released from the clams upon opening would evaporate in the extreme oven temps? I find it difficult to duplicate the ultra-high heat of a commercial pizza oven at home,..especially, if you use parchment paper (beneath the pizza) when it goes into the oven. What are the temps involved here...? Use a very hot grill..?

Mar 06, 2009
PotShard in General Topics

Wabbit season

"Buford's Bunnies"..? Likely, you would have gone out of business overnight. Many of our neighbors are totally repelled by the mere thought of eating rabbit. I think a lot of people don't realize where their food comes from, and under what kind of conditions. If they did,..they would not eat chicken, or drink milk, etc. Our three Australian Shepherds come close,..but have only caught one wild bunny. They are great mousers, and one takes down any coyote he sees near our place,...but those fassssst cottontails & "Jacks" make monkeys out of them.

Dec 26, 2008
PotShard in General Topics

Wabbit season

We frequently eat rabbit...but not the obnoxious wild critters. At present, I have Champagne d'Argents, an old, old french breed of meat rabbit. These do not taste like Chicken, or wild rabbits. I grow our own, because I a very picky about the processing, and resultant quality of the meat. Most of America has the "Easter Bunny Syndrome"...and won't eat rabbit. I think Spain ?? is the largest present producer of rabbit in the world. A good, lean meat, very amenable to a many cooking methods. Use spices recommended for veal.

Dec 26, 2008
PotShard in General Topics

Lutefisk [split from Quebec]

Please people, do not confuse Lutefisk with Bacalao. Salt Cod, or Bacalao, is merely salted cod. Lye added to the curing of Lutefisk transforms the similar fish into a very DIS-similar foodstuff (some people would argue that Lutefisk is actually a foodstuff?). As my father was a good Lutheran Norvegian from Minniesoda, we ate Lutefisk every Christmas eve. Living in OR & WA we rarely found the dried Lutefisk which required soaking. The gelatinous common grocery store version could vary tremendously in quality. Many Norskiis also over-cook Lutefisk...turning it into nasty slop. The die hard Christmas people would sop it up with their Lefse anyway. As DH hates Lutefisk...we eat Salt Cod. Much more versatile, and far less "unique".

Dec 26, 2008
PotShard in General Topics

Pomegranates - what am I missing?

We only eat the Poms that I grow. This makes store-bought ones disappointing. Our stores do sell pretty poor produce in general, and area residents often grow their own pomegranates here (the commonly-planted variety is still Wonderful though). Happy, that you live in a location with great produce managers! Enjoy.

Oct 28, 2008
PotShard in General Topics

Pomegranates - what am I missing?

Sounds like many readers either very much love, or hate, pomegranates. Sad. Sad, indeed, 'cause most of the "fresh" supermarket product is likely a long-stored old commercial variety named "Wonderful". A poor variety, with big seeds, typically picked "young" for transport. The result, unfortunately,... is a very tart, rubbery seedy fruit, not great, unless you were of age in the Tie-Dye/Macrame era. A fresh pomegranate, from one of the newer cultivars is excellent. Some of the newer Poms are nearly seedless...very juicy, more complex in flavor, and easy to separate from the less-dominant "pithy part". 'Ambrosia'..very small seeded, is close to heaven. Other good vars are Eversweet, Red Silk, Kashmir Blend...etc...etc(many different cultivars out thar). A multitude of newer Poms are being grown, but most never reach the mundane shelves of our markets. Pomegranate molasses (easier to purchase from a number of "ethnic stores"), is also excellent to cook with. An interesting clash of Rich, decadent,...offset by astringency. Sweet & tart. Great, for many lamb/beef stews.

Oct 27, 2008
PotShard in General Topics

Best use of Gorgonzola/Blue Cheese

We love Blue Cheese or Gorgonzola topping grilled steaks & burgers. A Maitre de in Quebec YEARS ago influenced my love of table-side blue cheese dressing. Crush a big clove l'ail (garlic) with a small amount of salt in a wooden salad bowl. Add a small amount of Xtra Virgin Olive Oil, cracked Poivre (pepper), blue cheese...press & mix all with a wooden spoon. Add romaine, croutons n'toss. I sometimes use roasted pine nuts or pecans...adding them with the laitue (lettuce). I also make a blue cheese, or Gorgonzola spread: Lot's o' garlic mashed in a mortar, with olive oil & fresh rosemary & pepper. Add a teensy bit of Worcestershire, and salt.

Sep 26, 2008
PotShard in Cheese

Salt Cod and Clam Stew

I have not made this recipe, but it sounds like it would be good. We like Salt Cod/Baccalao. NEVER use the "boxed stuff". It is AWFUL. Salt Cod varies considerably, depending on how it has been handled, and what culture it comes from. Cuban, Puerto Rican, Spanish, etc, etc, have recipes for using salt cod. Your best bet is trying to find Norwegian exported cod online...Unless you live next door to the local Quebec Cod Co-Op like we once did. Salt Cod is variable in "saltiness", ..but do not over-soak.

Mar 24, 2008
PotShard in Recipes