Mr Taster's Profile

Title Last Reply

FINALLY... a real, honest-to-Hashem method for making real lower east side SALT FERMENTED KOSHER DILL PICKLES, as directed by Moe, a 90+ year old former pickle master

stigemup,

Listen to acgold7. (S)he's got a lot more pickling experience under his/her belt than I do.

Mr Taster

about 22 hours ago
Mr Taster in Home Cooking

FINALLY... a real, honest-to-Hashem method for making real lower east side SALT FERMENTED KOSHER DILL PICKLES, as directed by Moe, a 90+ year old former pickle master

My pleasure. I'm so delighted that this thread has had the lifespan that it has had.

It also makes me wonder how many picklemaking companies have used this recipe to veer away from vinegar as their pickling agent of choice.

If there are any professional picklemakers out there who have changed their method based on this thread, I'd love to know!

Mr Taster

about 22 hours ago
Mr Taster in Home Cooking

FINALLY... a real, honest-to-Hashem method for making real lower east side SALT FERMENTED KOSHER DILL PICKLES, as directed by Moe, a 90+ year old former pickle master

Hello in Taiwan! I've been many times (my in-laws live there) and can understand your need to taste a familiar flavor.

Well first of all, if ice is forming then yes, it's too cold. Cold slows down the bacteria so 24 hours in cold was probably not adequate to jump start fermentation. (The whole point is to start the bacteria working in an environment warmer than the fridge.) I'd start by putting them in a warmer place, maybe on top of the fridge, (or wait until summer!) Look for signs that fermentation have begun (bubbles, foam, etc) before putting them in cold fermentation.

Mr Taster

about 23 hours ago
Mr Taster in Home Cooking

FINALLY... a real, honest-to-Hashem method for making real lower east side SALT FERMENTED KOSHER DILL PICKLES, as directed by Moe, a 90+ year old former pickle master

Yup. Which is exactly why it's so important to get the measurements weighed correctly-- even under ideal circumstances, accounting for all factors that you can possibly account for, the environment can still have it's way with your pickles.

Mr Taster

1 day ago
Mr Taster in Home Cooking

Mr Taster's first report as a Portland resident! Boxer Ramen? Oy.

I suspect it has something more to do with the affluent-hipster-love-for-all-things-pickled than it does with having roots in Japanese-Korean crossover culture.

But that's just a guess.

Mr Taster

2 days ago
Mr Taster in Metro Portland

Mr Taster's first report as a Portland resident! Boxer Ramen? Oy.

Oh, and DO NOT MISS the Saturday farmer's market on the PSU campus (not the one at the waterfront, which is more about crafts than food). In terms of scale, it dwarfs the Hollywood and Santa Monica markets and is a rollicking good time, to boot.

Mr Taster

2 days ago
Mr Taster in Metro Portland

FINALLY... a real, honest-to-Hashem method for making real lower east side SALT FERMENTED KOSHER DILL PICKLES, as directed by Moe, a 90+ year old former pickle master

Thanks for posting, smaki. But this recipe needs to come with a BIG warning to any newbie attempting to make this recipe.

As has been discussed extensively here, two different types of salt (even if they're both kosher) can weigh out VERY differently for the same by volume, so an inexperienced person trying to recreate your recipe could very well fail, despite following your recipe to the letter. There are already so many X factors in getting lacto-fermented pickles right, so we need to assert control over as much of the process as possible, and that means getting the brine as close to 100% right as we can.

Please provide measurements by weight (preferably grams) for the water and salt.

Thanks,

Mr Taster

2 days ago
Mr Taster in Home Cooking

Mr Taster's first report as a Portland resident! Boxer Ramen? Oy.

Hi saltricks

Someone once told me how Portland, at it's core, is really an American food town and I'd say that's pretty spot-on. There's a lot of American food, filtered through the local/organic/sustainable filter. And once in a while, a white guy cooks non-American food and becomes famous for it.

Blue Star really is magnificent. Their raspberry glazed cake donut trumps Bob's (which I love) by a mile.

The happy hour deals are definitely a huge difference from LA, not to be missed. Many expensive, well-regarded restaurants like Paley's Place invariably have a happy hour that gives you a taste of their cooking for $20 instead of $60 and that's pretty wonderful. They tend to end early (6pm) and start up again around 10pm, but the cost is so much lower for high quality hipster cooking than anything that's widely available in LA. I love the happy hour at Little Bird (sister restaurant to Le Pigeon) but really, there are so, so many others worth researching.

I found Nong's KMG underwhelming. I prefer Rama Thai's version (in Beaverton). In general, I'd say stay away from Asian food as there are so many better and less dumbed-down options in LA, and at cheaper prices.

One thing that's very popular is a focus on making vegetables really delicious. The (expensive) salads at Ava Gene's were truly magnificent. I understand Ox also makes some pretty wonderful vegetables, though I haven't yet been.

Screen Door's fried chicken was truly magnificent. I'd go for that, but remember many places refuse to take reservations (which is part of the anti-elitist vein that Portland holds dear) so you'll be standing in line at 5:00pm with a bunch of other people, waiting for that glorious chicken.

Mr Taster

2 days ago
Mr Taster in Metro Portland

Will Chowhound ever be a major player in food reviews and discussion

No. The first amendment prevents the government from arresting you for the things you say.

It has nothing to do with how a private website administers it's rules of conduct.

Mr Taster

Apr 30, 2015
Mr Taster in Site Talk

Where can I find actually good coffee in PDX?

I'd like to add that I've found a place right next door to my office-- Caffe Umbria makes a truly lovely, enjoyable, complex, solidly medium roasted coffee with all kinds of lovely caramel notes. It's beautiful stuff.

Just looked them up for the first time and see that they're based in Seattle, which makes sense, since they're still solidly positioned on, as far as I'm concerned, the "good coffee" bandwagon :)

Mr Taster

Apr 22, 2015
Mr Taster in Metro Portland

SAN MARZANO (DOP) TOMATOES. What's the big deal?

Of course it always comes down to individual taste, but that is not a useful thing to contribute because all it does is serve to shut down conversation.

The discussion is still worth having because it is interesting, not because it will provide rigorous scientific proof. We're not curing cancer here, after all.

Mr Taster

Apr 20, 2015
Mr Taster in General Topics

SAN MARZANO (DOP) TOMATOES. What's the big deal?

Of course it always comes down to individual taste, but that is not a useful thing to contribute because all it does is serve to shut down conversation. This is an Internet food discussion board, after all- not the American Journal of Chemistry.

The discussion is still worth having because it is interesting, not because it will provide rigorous scientific proof. We're not curing cancer here, after all.

Mr Taster

Apr 20, 2015
Mr Taster in General Topics

Will Chowhound ever be a major player in food reviews and discussion

Hi Chowser.

You might like to read this suggestion I made a year and a half ago that would have greatly benefited people like you and me, who take real time to research on Chowhound.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/917598

Mr Taster

Apr 16, 2015
Mr Taster in Site Talk
1

FINALLY... a real, honest-to-Hashem method for making real lower east side SALT FERMENTED KOSHER DILL PICKLES, as directed by Moe, a 90+ year old former pickle master

This post is long and unwieldy at this point, but I think I mentioned somewhere that yes, you can pickle other vegetables. Sauerkraut, after all, is just shredded cabbage and salt, plus time. No brine required. The only thing to take into account is how much water the vegetable Will give off, because if you use this brine recipe with a very watery vegetable, the brine will dilute and not ferment the vegetable properly.

So yes, you can do it. But this recipe for brine will not work with every vegetable out there.

Mr Taster

Apr 14, 2015
Mr Taster in Home Cooking

Hover over avatars - no longer enlarges

Has he been getting married for the last four months? Cut that's how long I've been waiting for an update.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/9869...

Mr Taster

Apr 10, 2015
Mr Taster in Site Talk
2

What says NYC to you?

I'm cornfused.

Mr Taster

Apr 07, 2015
Mr Taster in Manhattan

What says NYC to you?

Hi ZaZa

>> Each person clearly has his or her own personal taste and preference—that’s for sure.

Of course! And you do not like belly lox- that's fair, because you grew up with it, gave it a shot in the appropriate context, and still didn't like it. I'm not here to try and convert someone who gave it a fair shake and still disliked it.

The reason I'm putting forward this information is for those people who really have no idea what it is, where it came from, or how to eat it (and there are plenty of those people-- belly lox, sadly, is a dying art form.) I fear potential belly lox lovers are going to be scared away by the well-meaning fish men at Zabar's who warn the tourist "it's really salty... are you sure?" And for the brave ones who accept a taste and are knocked back because they're not eating in on a bagel with cream cheese, thinking they just don't like it. It's doing a terrible disservice to this beautiful, traditional part of Ashkenazi appetizing history, and that kills me.

Someone who has never heard of belly lox, or has confused it with nova, gravlachs, or some other type of more popular fish, needs to understand how to eat it and not just assume it's the salty version of Nova. It's not.

Mr Taster

Apr 07, 2015
Mr Taster in Manhattan

What says NYC to you?

I've got to agree-- I was confused by the advice in that thread, too.

There's plenty of bad food in NYC, and lots of great inexpensive street food, too. Plus, I found out the hard way that Uber in NY is actually more expensive than taxis, which doesn't make any sense, but it's true. And suggesting people go to tripadvisor for advice on food? And making that suggestion on Chowhound, of all places? I'm baffled.

EDIT: I see smithr8020 is new to Chowhound, so lets go easy on him/her :) smithr8020, Chowhound has been among the most reliable sources for restaurant advice and knowledge since the late 1990s. There is a depth of knowledge here that simply does not exist on sites like tripadvisor, where you're likely to find suggestions like "only pizza is cheap in NYC" which is patently untrue, and completely misleading. Take a few hours to read through Chowhound before your next trip to NYC and you'll find an absolute treasure trove of info here. Maybe you'll even find your way to Flushing's Golden Mall, where you'll have to rethink that pizza's the only cheap-but-good food in NYC.

Mr Taster

Apr 07, 2015
Mr Taster in Manhattan
1

What says NYC to you?

I think the error that people make is they substitute belly lox with nova at a 1:1 ratio, which results in salt overload.

Belly lox is mean to be used sparingly, so that the sweetness of the cream cheese blends and balances out the saltiness. It should *not* taste overwhelmingly salty when you eat it (again, always on a bagel with cream cheese). If it does you're doing it wrong (or you're eating an inferior quality belly lox).

Also, I'd recommend against toasting. Toasting covers up imperfections in inferior bread (I call this the Quizno's effect).

If you've got a fresh, well made bagel, toasting spoils the texture. A freshly made high quality bagel has a crispy exterior (from the baking) and a chewy interior (from the boiling). Toasting kind of obscures and unifies the texture, or at least blunts these characteristics.

I'd even argue that high quality, fresh bagels do not need embellishment of any kind. You can eat them plain, like a soft pretzel, and they'll still be delicious. Malty, flavorful, crispy on the outside and chewy on the inside, with some moisture (they shouldn't be bone dry and hard to swallow.) If they don't have these characteristics, you're eating an inferior bagel.

Mr Taster

Apr 07, 2015
Mr Taster in Manhattan

Will Chowhound ever be a major player in food reviews and discussion

That's exactly right. I think Chowhound has been swaying to the pressure of implementing "likes" and such, but the reason why Chowhound has been so valuable over the years is precisely because it doesn't quantify easily. The detail and depth of knowledge is exactly why it's such a valuable resource.

Mr Taster

site forgetting "read" posts

I know.

Pat, seriously?

It's not like we're hounding you every week.

Is been four months since your last response on this topic.

If this is something you've dropped, as it appears to be, you should be transparent about it and take your lumps (and there will be lumps) so that we can all begin the process of moving on.

Mr Taster

Why Can Lactose-Intolerant People Eat Some Cheeses and Not Others?

Nobody has mentioned that raw (unpasteurized) milk still contains all of the live bacteria that digests lactose for you... Those are the "good" bacteria that are killed during pasteurization.

Some lactose intolerant period actually drink a glass of raw milk in the morning to fortify their gut with the bacteria that allows them to eat pasteurized dairy later in the day.

So if you live in a state which allows sales of raw milk, you may want to give that a shot. Raw milk farms are held (obviously) to impeccable cleanliness and hygiene standards.

Mr Taster

Mar 31, 2015
Mr Taster in Features

100 Things to Eat and Drink In Portland

As a new transplant in Portland, I'd love to see an update to this list.

Interesting that Voodoo made the list... I guess this was published in the days before Blue Star?

Mr Taster

Mar 30, 2015
Mr Taster in Metro Portland

Beaverton for work trip in April.

They do serve the #25 nem nuong at the Beaverton location. It was delicious.

Did you ever make it to Rama Thai? We love it there. The khao man gai is definitely a step above Nong's.

Mr Taster

Mar 30, 2015
Mr Taster in Metro Portland

Other PDX food boards?

Someone told me about a Korean place in Beaverton that makes hand-pulled noodles. Du Kuh Bee. Ever been? Any good? It looks like this could be a restaurant serving Korean style Chinese food. (As I learned from living close to Koreatown in Los Angeles for 10 years, yes that's a real thing.)

http://www.yelp.com/biz/du-kuh-bee-be...

Of course this being Portland, odds are more likely that it's a Korean place trying to survive by putting Chinese dishes on the menu.

Either way, it's worth checking out to find out for sure.

Mr Taster

Mar 30, 2015
Mr Taster in Metro Portland

Other PDX food boards?

Well, for better or for worse, there's been a changing of the guard here at Chowhound, and if you've been following the site talk discussions, they're encouraging and allowing things that Jim Leff never would have put up with.

I do remember in the old days when people would complain about moderation, and the response was always "Don't like it? Start your own board." Nice to see the good folks of Portland actually did that.

Mr Taster

Mar 30, 2015
Mr Taster in Metro Portland

Other PDX food boards?

Based on my pop-ins (I haven't yet made my first post), the back-and-forth on Portlandfood.org reminds me of how the LA Chowhound board is. Lots of back-and-forth conversation with opinionated, knowledgeable people.

The Portland Chowhound board by comparison is really, really quiet. grayelf's contributions are a major part of why the site remains useful to me, but when one person does a huge % of the heavy lifting, it's really not very good for business.

Mr Taster

Mar 30, 2015
Mr Taster in Metro Portland

Chowhound blamed for killing Breed St. Market

Within the vicinity of my office is the big food cart "pod" (this is what they call the clusters of food carts that take up residence in parking lots.) One of the carts is El Taco Yucateco (I think that's the one...) I was kind of surprised to see panuchos on the menu. I asked the vendor (who was a non-hipster Mayan) if he had cochinita pibil, and he did a double take. "How do you know what it's called?" I told him I was a huge fan of Chichen Itza in LA, and he understood.

The cochinita pibil is advertised on the menu as "shredded pork tacos", though I've seen internetters referring to it as "pulled pork" (because Portlanders, bless them, use what they know as a basis for comparison.) And they do know pork.

I asked him if he served/made the habanero salsa, and a big smile went across his face. "Of course!" Sadly, no poc chuc ("Because it's just a small cart-- I need to keep things simple.") The tacos are $2.25, and I'm heading there for lunch today for a panucho and a cochinita taco.

http://www.yelp.com/biz/el-taco-yucat...

Mr Taster

site forgetting "read" posts

Anyone? Bueller?

Mr Taster

Mar 30, 2015
Mr Taster in Site Talk
2

Chowhound blamed for killing Breed St. Market

Lol

I haven't yet had the time nor the inclination to investigate, but the word is that the real tacos come from specific cart vendors, not from the hipster-run fancier places that you're referring to.

Mr Taster

Mar 29, 2015
Mr Taster in Los Angeles Area