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Plane Food for a LOOONG Flight--Frozen pastrami?

Actually, oranges are kind of awful because they have a particularly strong odor that is often less pleasant to the person not eating them.

Grapes, blueberries, apples, etc. are all better choices, smell-wise.

Mar 25, 2014
Lizard in General Topics
1

What is American cuisine?

I think you're talking about Scotland. And also will second what Sunshine just said.

Mar 22, 2014
Lizard in General Topics

What is American cuisine?

Yes, and they're almost all bloody pasta and cheese. :)

But seriously quite starch heavy and yes, cheese heavy too.

Sorry, but varied and interesting vegetable-based dishes are not exactly the thing of the UK (save for in South Asian restaurants, or London, and even then...) Indeed, certain places in the U.S. (California, the Pacific Northwest, and the North East corridor) offer such a magnificent array of options that I am overjoyed to come over precisely for that. (If my village or places nearby had something even as marvellous as Herman's in Stockholm, I'd swoon.)

However, all that said, I've been pleased to see the introduction of meal-sized salads in some places. Over the years, the options have increased in general, and that's been welcome.

Mar 22, 2014
Lizard in General Topics

Passing of JonParker

This is tremendously sad news. His insights and kindness will be missed (and selfishly, yes, I'll miss someone whose politics I shared, even if I didn't share his gift for expressing the sentiments so well). His is a presence that will be missed on the boards and in the world.

Mar 21, 2014
Lizard in Site Talk
2

Indian Restaurants: UK vs. US

It may also be that you've developed a taste for sweet that means it's presence does not register.
The sweetness of food in the UK can be overpowering at times, especially for those not accustomed to it.

Mar 17, 2014
Lizard in General Topics

They're telling me what to like and how to like it!?

I must be slow. What is Gastronomos commending here (that is shown)? I could find only one link, and that one seemed more condemnation than anything....

Mar 11, 2014
Lizard in Food Media & News

Overheard in Thai restaurant...embarrassing "Yankees."

I can't believe I'm jumping in here, but:

1. I would hold back on judging the comment, only because I wasn't there. Someone may have been joking, and whether it was pulled off to any effect is in question. If said in all seriousness, that becomes another issue, but again, still not there.

2. I'm puzzled by the question of why they were even in a Thai restaurant if they don't like spicy food (by which I assume one means 'hot' rather than flavourful). It is my understanding that there are Thai dishes that are less hot in general (and that some (Thais) spice up with hot chillies based on taste, but not requirement of the dish). Indeed, the pride with which some declare their desire to eat the hottest of the hot and feel proud because they are so 'authentic' reminds me of various Asians I have known (from the continent, from East and South) who disliked spicy food.

(This kind of pride in the spicy makes me think of the sketch 'Going for an English' in which the Indians ask for food to be as bland as possible, both as a show of their bravery and a show of the sort of bullish ignorance which some approach food of another culture. Of course, they could have also been making fun of English food.)

Of course, I could be wrong about spiciness in Thai food, and certainly there can be preferences. But this sort of question as to why this group should even be there is puzzling. It is possible to have an aversion to spiciness/hotness whilst enjoying the flavours of Thai food. (Not that I'd know, since I throw chillies onto almost everything I eat. But I see that as a failing on my part-- not the part of others, but sometimes I wonder about this practice of mine.)

Mar 10, 2014
Lizard in Not About Food
1

How Europeans think Americans have breakfast

A bit meagre for Ron Swanson: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dlecey...

Mar 06, 2014
Lizard in Food Media & News
1

two broke girls

The problem with poor grammar and numerous misspellings is not that they somehow fail to meet expectations of rigid pedants, but that they impede the point of writing, which is to communicate an idea. I also think of good usage as good manners: I don't want to people to have to struggle to understand what I write, because when I post, it is essentially a request to listen to what I have to say. Why make it more difficult?

Meanwhile: '2 Broke Girls' is a sitcom whose relevance is so dated, it almost seems like a piece of performance art. The critiques of Brooklyn culture seem facile to me-- more laziness than anything. I mean, cupcakes? And anti-hipster jabs that fail to dig deeper than 'Look at that hipster' are almost as played as hipsters. (Although that said, the tumblr with the similar premise was pretty good- http://lookatthisfuckinghipster.tumbl...) Same with the sex and race jokes, which seem more thrilled with their naughtiness than actually aiming for anything humour can actually do with a topic. That said, I do like Eric Andre and think he's a welcome presence on any programme.

Feb 13, 2014
Lizard in Food Media & News
5

Is Jewish Cuisine a Subset of American?

Indeed, and regardless of whether these have made it to America, the declaration that Jews are Eurocentric is insulting as it absolutely ignores the existence of Sephardim and Mizrahim.

I must stay away from this conversation, as it seems answers are Eurocentric or ill-informed when it comes to Jewry, or US-centric overall. (Of course, there are some exceptions, but I'm going to give myself an aneurysm if I continue to read this thread.)

Feb 06, 2014
Lizard in General Topics
6

Is Jewish Cuisine a Subset of American?

Careful. Jewry does not necessarily mean Ashkenazi Jewry. Now I have to ask, is Jewry a word? Writing it so many times has confused me.

Feb 05, 2014
Lizard in General Topics

Is Jewish Cuisine a Subset of American?

That's fine, but please remember that America (the US) is only a piece of this 'larger picture' and not the larger picture itself, ok?

Feb 05, 2014
Lizard in General Topics

Is Jewish Cuisine a Subset of American?

You seem to be fighting everyone who is trying to correct you on this, but the answer is that you are not right.

Jews are a disapora, which means there are Jews in numerous countries, and in each case, one can see the ways in which there is a fusion with local food traditions (prominence of apricots over raisins, say).

But rather than explain Jewish cuisine to you (there are some good books out there), I'd simply ask that you remember Jews do not live in the US alone. Thus, your question kind of insulting to those of us who live in Europe, South America, Asia, Africa, etc...

(That said, maybe I am missing something in your phrasing of this question.)

Feb 05, 2014
Lizard in General Topics
3

are hounds smarter than your average bear? want opinions

Sandy, perhaps you can read Duffy's comment, which acknowledges that there are differences in American and British spelling, and that makes certain choices less one of affectation than of correct (for the region) spelling.

Jan 21, 2014
Lizard in Not About Food

are hounds smarter than your average bear? want opinions

Duffy, although I risk angering people with this, I encourage you to consider the variety of English accents. There are a range of cultural assumptions affixed to each. But in general, I'd say it's a good idea not to condemn entire nations to cultural inferiority.

Jan 21, 2014
Lizard in Not About Food

are hounds smarter than your average bear? want opinions

Things that grate (and are not great):

'Could of'

'Woof down'

And Duffy? Has it ever occurred to you that some of us are not writing from America, and thus our spelling is simply correct, and not 'snooty'?

Jan 20, 2014
Lizard in Not About Food

Mobile device use by guests . . .

Why is it rude? (And we aren't talking about emergencies, which, as exigent circumstances, are precisely what allow diversions from protocol.) Because it suggests that you have no interest in speaking to any of the people who actually made an effort to be in that space and because it suggests to the host that you don't care for the friends s/he has invited you to spend time with. It is an aggressive withdrawal, that doesn't even have the benefit of social awkwardness. (I am an introverted sort who can find small talk agonising, but the fact is, when I go out, there is an obligation to be decent to those in one's environs. Or I can hide the old fashioned way: scanning bookshelves and talking to the pets and/or children).

(I'm really curious what career your husband has that requires non-stop contact. I mean, I know doctors and even they get a break sometimes. Or... are you a president's wife? If so, I'm sure your aide-de-camp can bring you up to speed on preferred behaviour at public gatherings.)

Dec 27, 2013
Lizard in Not About Food
2

Restaurant Behavior Advice - Paris

Thank you all for your responses. As I indicated alreadt, I responding to Indianriver's 'Tourists order Perrier, locals have Evian', which, personally, I saw as a bit of a stretch. (And interesting, given that Evian is one of the worse tasting bottled waters, imo.)

That said, I am not Parisian (I wish) and far more familiar with the custom of neighbouring francophone regions where l'eau gazeuse is our choice (but then, neighbouring or not, still not Parisian (*sigh*) and thus tourist.

What is interesting, to be, is a matter of generational stubbornness (or maybe it's individual) as my family stick with bottled rigorously; I think they are unable to trust that what comes out of the tap is now potable. And as I am old enough to remember the days when we really couldn't drink the tap water, I understand the leeriness.

Meanwhile, I am interested to hear about the turn to presenting and bottling their own. Very cool, that.

Dec 19, 2013
Lizard in France

Restaurant Behavior Advice - Paris

Right, but unless one can get l'eau gazeuse from the robinet, I don't understand the declaration-- especially as Indianriver seems to highlight brands, not tap.

Dec 18, 2013
Lizard in France

Restaurant Behavior Advice - Paris

Is the water advice about brands? Or about a Parisian preference for l'eau plate?

Dec 17, 2013
Lizard in France

Restaurant Behavior Advice - Paris

Cute. Although it brings to mind how many times I've been greeted with 'Je vous écoute'.

Dec 17, 2013
Lizard in France

Top Chef NOLA - Ep. #10 - 12/11/13 (Spoilers)

Fried egg? I thought Carrie served her dish with poached eggs. Or did something go wrong and she had to adjust?

Dec 13, 2013
Lizard in Food Media & News

UK 'Fast Food'

For those American hounds who hold the UK to some high standard:

http://news.stv.tv/scotland/251900-fi...

Dec 06, 2013
Lizard in Food Media & News

Two hours late without calling/texting the host?

I don't see this as so close, although fraught family relations are the common denominator.

But this cousin's behaviour is not on. Not at all. She invited herself, behaved inconsiderately of others (yumyumjen and her guests), and then opted, instead of apologising, to send insult. Yumyumjen acted entirely within acceptable bounds: stating the boundaries clearly and directly is not rude.

All that said, I do hope that there is no grudge held against the cousin's daughter (and there doesn't appear to be) because this girl will be in need of responsible adults in her life.

Dec 03, 2013
Lizard in Not About Food

Thanksgiving Etiquette

To be honest, I don't understand why you were so upset. It sounds like everyone was pitching in so there was an expectation that people would bring things.

Your SIL opted to bring something you wish she hadn't and that you wish you had approved (from what I gather), but I don't see how a different side of stuffing expresses distrust of your own. There are so many types of stuffing out there. As for the brother, perhaps he indeed had a favourite ritualised food, and hoped to have it there as well. The casserole dish isn't offensive to me either, but at least a way of minimising the expectation that you should plate.

But even if reading her actions in the most sinister way possible would yield the truth behind it, why do this to yourself? And why make a thing of it? It seems a lot of energy to take and give offence when everyone can enjoy the plenty and the company.

(I won't comment on the issues around cooking stuffing in a turkey...)

Dec 02, 2013
Lizard in Not About Food
5

The Mis-use of "Miss"

The interesting thing, more than common practice/interaction, is that (when I arrived) so many forms gave me the option of Miss and Mrs only (still the case with my bank!).

Meanwhile, I am all the more curious: You live in Paris and work in UK? You seem to have cracked something I am keen to. (I would work in Paris save for the fact that my particular field of research isn't as represented there; it's more a Northern Europe thing...) I continue to envy you.

Nov 24, 2013
Lizard in Not About Food

The Mis-use of "Miss"

Indeed there are, Sunshine. I am one of them (when not using my other professional title). However, I'm sure you can sympathise with the difficulty of asserting 'Ms' in a see of institutional 'Miss or 'Mrs'.
(Take note, I am in the UK, and I'm not keen on having my experience rendered invisible. Nor, based on your posts, are you someone who would want to contribute to that.)

Nov 23, 2013
Lizard in Not About Food

The Mis-use of "Miss"

That's probably because you don't work in the UK. The choice of 'Miss' or 'Mrs' is still popular in these parts.

(Re: Sunshine's observation about work environments.)

Nov 23, 2013
Lizard in Not About Food

Why the 'Food Stamp Challenge' isn't as progressive (or informative) as some think

I'm scared to go over there. Last time it made me kind of ragey.

Nov 20, 2013
Lizard in Food Media & News
2

Why the 'Food Stamp Challenge' isn't as progressive (or informative) as some think

What I mean is the faux-progressive that veils the neoliberal impulse. Apologies for confusion.

Nov 20, 2013
Lizard in Food Media & News