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Types of soy milk

Yes, those are some of the ingredients that are different in the two types.

I don't make a value judgement as to whether the the Asian style vs Western style or the fortifications are good or bad. I merely note that their chemistries are different. The chemistries of the different formulations have an effect on their storage life.

What I do know is that regardless of I buy or make the Asian style soybean milk , I usually have to make sure I finish the batch in a relatively short time (within a week for homemade; by the expiration date on the package for manufactured) or else the products start to ferment or "gas" up and resulting in extreme GI distress for me. (Unless, as I noted previously, it's in a can.)

May 31, 2010
alycon in General Topics

Types of soy milk

Read the ingredient lists carefully. There is a big difference between traditional Asian soybean milk (water, soybeans and maybe a little salt or sugar) which, unless in canned form, must be refrigerated and the soy milks made as substitutes for cow's milk.

May 31, 2010
alycon in General Topics

Supplies for Lunar New Year/Passover in Vienna

I'm back from my day out in Vienna. Unfortunately, due to the nature of my travelling companion, we spent too much of the day walking aimlessly not nearly enough time eating or shopping. She had wanted to be in charge of planning our day ( and I agreed) but her preparation left much to be desired and as a result, we lost considerable time.

Sadly, by the time we arrived in the 2nd district, all the shops on my list were closed. I had anticipated early closing for Shabbat,, but not early enough. Given my experiences in other Jewish quarters and having worked in a Jewish bagelry in my youth, I had guessed they would close an hour before sunset. Uh, no. According to the posted hours for most of the shops, they closed at 2PM on Fridays. Drat. My loss.

Still we did manage to make it to two places.

Ober laa was wonderful! I had the chocolate mousse torte and it was perfect! A thin layer of dark chocolate genoise, just enough to give the mousse a sturdy base, wonderful chocolate mousse and gently melted chocolate for the top layer. Delicious!

Nakwon is primarily an Korean market, with marked preference for Japanese foodstuffs. NIce selection of basic Asian produce and a large section of Indian spices, spice mixes and sauces. Also they offer many frozen products.. I would recommend it for anyone who wants to explore Korean food. There are products from Indonesia, Malaysian, Thailand, etc. . . as well but not a very large selection. If you go, be aware that the store is partially organized by country and partially by food type. So, for example, you will find Korean sauces in the Korean section, but the Chinese and the Indonesian sauces will be in the sauce section.

Many thanks to Sturmi and CervAnteZ for their great suggestions! Please, keep them coming! Given my failure in the 2nd district this time around, I am already making plans to return to Vienna next month, so I can make a second attempt to shop for Passover and also for Persian New Year . . .

Feb 12, 2010
alycon in Europe

An Expat’s Dining Survival Guide to Tulsa Updated 9-2007

I would point out that Nam Hai is mostly a Vietnamese market.( Only because Brian calls it a little slice of China and that seems a little misleading.)

As to the new place on 31st and 129th, It's OK. It is trying to carry more of a multinational variety of goods than other Asian markets in Tulsa ( including a fish counter in the back). I did note the last time that I was there, that much of their frozen seafood originates from China, which I tend to shy away from , due to questions about sustainability and fishery practices.

Feb 06, 2010
alycon in Great Plains

Supplies for Lunar New Year/Passover in Vienna

Ooooooo! I see great potential here. I will bring both my backpack and my cooler. I hope the cold temperatures hold out until after I have my purchases safely home. :-)
Have you been to any of these shops?
(and apologies for the mistake in my original post; I should have written Naschmarkt, not Neumarkt.)

Feb 06, 2010
alycon in Europe

Supplies for Lunar New Year/Passover in Vienna

Yes, that is what I'm looking for ! Thank you and I'll report back after I've gone.

Feb 04, 2010
alycon in Europe

Supplies for Lunar New Year/Passover in Vienna

I currently live in Brno, Czech Republic. While I love this city, I have not found many resources for the Asian or the Ashkenazi foods that I am used to in the US. Normally this doesn't bother me, as I enjoy the local foodstuffs very much and am content with it. However, two major holidays are fast approaching, the Lunar New Year (aka Chinese New Year) and Passover ( yes, I know it's two months away but these things sneak up fast).

I've investigated both the Vietnamese market and the Japanese shop in town as well as made enquiries of local friends without much success for the things I have an annual craving for. (Have tried for the last two years without luck.)

In two weeks, I will go to Vienna for one day. Can anyone recommend any reasonably priced shops where I can find the ingredients for Lunar New Year? (Note I do not consider Julius Meinl "reasonably priced" .) New Year's Cake especially! Or restaurants that might offer some specialties for Lunar New Year? (Extra bonus would be a good Chinese BBQ place.)

And Passover? I don't require Kosher for Passover certification but at least some matzos, preferably egg. (Last year, I had to ask a visiting friend stationed in Italy to bring me a box from the base commissary. Alas, she is stationed elsewhere now.)

I've tried the Neumarkt in Vienna before, as well as the 2 or 3 asian groceries that are adjacent., which were OK, but culinarily a bit on the haphazard and small side. Are there better places to look?

One thing that makes this a challenge is that I will travel by either train or bus which means a 2 hour ride with limited refrigeration. ( I have a portable cooler that I normally take with me.)

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Jan 31, 2010
alycon in Europe

Denver- Bakery

Thanks for the recommendations!

Can you please tell me if Gateaux Bakery does only cakes? I tried to look on their website for more information, but the website has been suspended.

Jul 30, 2008
alycon in Southwest

denver trip august-ethnic eats suggestions? [moved from Midwest board]

Well, first suggestion I would make is posting this in the Southwest Board, where most of the Colorado postings are grouped. You can also search that board for suggestions. I remember various posts on Asian places there.

Jul 29, 2008
alycon in Southwest

Denver- Bakery

In addition to the needs I outlined in my post for Denver food sources, can anyone recommend a good bakery in Denver? Preferably close to the Denver Convention Center, where I am staying for my visit, but I will have some access to transportation. My preferences tend to run to European and Asian bakeries. I've not had particularly good experiences with Mexican ones. ( I just didn't like the ones I sampled.)

Thanks again!

Jul 29, 2008
alycon in Southwest

Denver- Food sourcing

Yes! I might not use them, but I definitely want to have the choices available.

Thanks!

Jul 28, 2008
alycon in Southwest

Denver- Food sourcing

Many thanks to everyone who has replied so far! Please keep the great suggestions coming. I am working out my strategy this week and will draft a preliminary plan, which I hope to post for a feasibility check.

Jul 25, 2008
alycon in Southwest

Denver- Food sourcing

ClaireWalter- You are right. On the first two days, driving isn't a huge issue. But definitely on subsequent days, walkable distance is really useful, particularly as sleep and personnel become scarcer commodities.

Jul 25, 2008
alycon in Southwest

Denver- Food sourcing

Excellent! Thank you. Can you give me a rough idea how big Cherry Creek is or long it would take to power through the entire market? Not because I don't want to stop at every stand, but chances are that time will start to be a critical factor on Wednesday morning.

Jul 25, 2008
alycon in Southwest

Denver- Food sourcing

One more lovely challenge is that I need to have the suite open ASAP on Tuesday. I am going to enjoy this. . .

Jul 25, 2008
alycon in Southwest

Denver- Food sourcing

Yes it is. Any help you can offer will be much appreciated!

My travel group arrives Monday evening and will be staying in cheap lodgings on the outskirts. Tuesday, much of the major supply runs will have to be done. but one of the constraints on how and what we can do in the morning, is whether or not we can get early check-in for our suite. Give Denver's recent streak of mid-90 temperatures, I am loath to leave anything remotely persihable in a vehicle for more time than absolutely necessary.Another reason for needing dry ice.

In addition, the committee has advised discretion regarding bringing in food and beverage into the party hotel. . . or generous tipping to the porters. I live for these challenges

Please e-mail me to arrange contact details. My e-address is:
alyconart at yahoo dot com.

Thanks!

Jul 25, 2008
alycon in Southwest

Denver- Food sourcing

I am running a hospitality suite for a convention taking place at Denver Convention Center. It starts in ten days. We will be at a nearby hotel. As my organization has a very strict budget, I will do a lot of the catering on site. I need recommendations for local places to shop for higher-end goodies without the higher-end prices. The suite will run 18+ hours each day during the convention, so I need to cover the "Hobbit" diet. :-)

(Hobbit diet- breakfast, second breakfast, elevensies, luncheon, tea, dinner and supper. Plus putting on the kettle for tea and filling in any digestive crevices as needed.)

What I am looking for:
local farmer's markets
ethnic markets
gourmet markets on the level of Trader Joe's in terms of pricing and of equal quality or higher
dry ice
a wine selection that won't break my budget or reputation

My limitations:
No cooking
Limited refrigeration

While I will be able to shop at places far from the convention site before the event, during the days that the convention takes place, I will be restricted to one supply run per day, preferably under two hours. Locales and addresses would be much appreciated, as none in my group are familiar with Denver and we will be relying heavily on GPS for navigation.

Also, what is the sales tax for food in Denver? From a quick glance, it seems that Colorado's tax system is a tad bit complex.

Any help would be very much appreciated!

Jul 25, 2008
alycon in Southwest

An Expat’s Dining Survival Guide to Tulsa Updated 9-2007

Siegi's is a great place. But it is Austrian, not German. I know it sounds nit-picky, but having hauled stuff from Siegi's to North Carolina for homesick German friends, the distinction does matter.

Mar 28, 2008
alycon in Great Plains

An Expat’s Dining Survival Guide to Tulsa Updated 9-2007

Cedar's touts their food as Lebanese.

Feb 12, 2008
alycon in Great Plains

An Expat’s Dining Survival Guide to Tulsa Updated 9-2007

Just spent the last six weeks in Tulsa, visiting family. Had a wonderful cup of real hot chocolate (mostly liquefied chocolate) at Kokoa's. Oh, it was good!

Would gently suggest that people note the difference between Mexican, Tex-Mex and Sonoran Mexican when speaking of restaurants, as it would avoid unpleasant surprises for some. That aside, El Rio Verde, Senor Taquila's (51st and Harvard location) and Cafe Lindo were worthy excursions.

Also noticed that nothing has been said about the BBQ places on the North Side. Unfortunately, it's been several years since I've eaten in the North Side, but we used to go to Lattimer's and Reed's all the time. Good stuff. And not a Q place, but Phil's was definitely the greasy spoon to go to. . .

And Jimmy Egg's serves a very day-fueling breakfast.

Feb 03, 2008
alycon in Great Plains

Cooking Club members: How To?

I've had several different experiences while living in North Carolina, in the Triangle area. I don't know how much this applies else where but these are the ones I participated in.

"Supper Clubs" - Social group was about 6-7 couples who meet bimonthly, rotating houses each time. Usually free form potluck. The couples were established friends from the same social circle/country club and housing development. Drawback was some repetition of bringing the same dish to each event.

Another "supper club" system was organized by my university to facilitate socialization of new staff/faculty with established faculty/staff. Groups were 5-6 couples, meeting bimonthly. Usually in same or similar departments. Rotated location each time between homes. Hosts would determine theme of dinner and assign recipes to participants. Drawback was that some people didn't "click" and others found the assigned recipes expensive or beyond their skill level.

International "cooking club" -Volunteer program under the aegis of international student life spouses' program. I ran this one for several years, after the original organizers returned to their home countries. Group membership ranged from 6 -22 people, depending on contracts offered by the university. During the academic term, we meet once a week at a regular location. People signed up for the date of their choice. There is no monetary membership fee, but individuals are responsible for full participation. At a typical session, the "chef" would pass out recipes, direct prep work and demonstrate the appropriate techniques. After the cooking was done, we would sit down to eat what we had made and while dining, discuss the food and whatever else was of current interest. The program was designed to encourage cultural exchange among members, so everyone helped with all aspects.The menu and food supplies was the chef's responsibility. Occasionally, we had outings to local ethnic markets, farmer's markets, the state fair and u-pick farms for seasonal crops. We have a cookie exchange for winter holidays and a Valentine's potluck, which everyone is asked to bring a dish that they consider romantic. They also had to be prepared to explain to the group why.A typical session ran about 3 hours.

International potlucks. This was an offshoot of the international cooking club, which I also organized. For the internationals unable to join our weekly cooking sessions, but still wanted to participate, we held regular potlucks. Attendance- anywhere from 2-36 people, depending on the time of year. People are encouraged to bring friends, spouses and offspring, It was mostly free form, although to give it some structure, I would state either the protein course I was making and/or what "feast" we were celebrating. We celebrated, Chinese New Year, St. Patrick's, ANZAC day, birthdays,baby showers Summer solstice, poolside, Thanksgiving, etc. . . and as soon as it was warm enough to eat outside, we grilled regularly.Location varied depending on time of year but usually at the university's International House.

More details available, if wanted, but I don't want to bore people too much. . .

Hope this helps.

Feb 03, 2008
alycon in Not About Food