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NolaTravelers's Profile

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St. Emilion area dining and wineries

Disappointed in our past visits for cuisine, love the village and area. Recommendations for both fine and casual dining, anyone? The Hostellerie de la Plaisance restaurant - wonderful or not? Is anyone aware of any wine maisons that are open for a tour without an appointment? Merci!

Feb 18, 2012
NolaTravelers in France

Normandy gastronomy please

From Paris north...we follow our palates and historical sites...any "must do's"; any chateaux or B&B we should stay in? All suggestions welcome; we're not snobby just like adventures, great food and welcoming hosts.

Sep 17, 2008
NolaTravelers in France

Brittany great authentic restuarants?

Thoughts, anyone - nothing with a star required; great food and adventuresome palate - and yes, we have a car and lots of time...in October. Many thanks!

Sep 17, 2008
NolaTravelers in France

Normandy and Brittany Restaurant Recommendations

Anyone have suggestions for Normandy and Brittany? We're driving, one week, enjoy unpretentious country auberge-type places; happy wanderers...and if any gites or B&Bs come to mind, please share!

Aug 05, 2008
NolaTravelers in France

Sunday Lunch in Paris

Thanks PhilD...we're staying in the 6th and heading to Gare de Lyon for mid afternoon...So something open about 11 am; we prefer typical bistro food (love Paul Bert). Nothing with a star! Any thoughts are appreciated.

Jul 26, 2008
NolaTravelers in France

Sunday Lunch in Paris

We'll be in Paris the first weekend of October and want to meet friends for a great wine soaked bistro or brasserie lunch - on a Sunday. Does anyone know who might be open besides a hotel restaurant? Thanks!

Jul 25, 2008
NolaTravelers in France

Paris Gourmet Guidebooks?

Here are some websites I've found very helpful. I then cut and paste into Word and create mini-guides: gayot.com (destination guides), wine spectator.com (requires a membership but worth it), gourmet.com (not epicurious, gourmet) and then go to their editor's blog, concierge.com. Also, it's interesting to check the travel sections of large city newspapers, not just in the U.S. but also London, etc.
One tip: Definitely go to Le Paul Bert in the 11th. We went with French friends last May - it's a classic bistro and worth the taxi fare - it's in a neighborhood you won't stumble across. We also love Au Bon Saint Pourcain in the 6th near St. Suplice, tiny and fun. Bon Appetit!

Jan 30, 2008
NolaTravelers in France

Excellent no-star restaurants in Alsace?

It's hard not to have a bad meal in France. The Alsace is gorgeous; we spent 6 days there last May. They're of course farm based so your veggies will be excellent - and what's in season. We were there during asparagas season; everywhere we turned more asparagas...anywhere here's one thought:
Wistub du Sommelier 51 Grand Rue, Bergheim Telephone (011) 33 3 89 73 69 99 Open Lunch, Tuesday through Saturday; dinner, Monday through Saturday Cost
This small, homey restaurant in the charming town of Bergheim reverses the usual approach to wine and food. Owner Jean-Marie Stoeckel was first a sommelier (at Alsace three-stars Auberge de l'Ill and Au Crocodile, among others), and he has tailored his menu to an innovative, extensive and reasonably priced wine list.
The Wistub manages to be traditional without falling into kitsch. Two small rooms are set with simple wooden benches and chairs. It's a fine frame for the unpretentious food, basically traditional dishes that have been both lightened and sharpened. The onion tart is extraordinary, rich and sweet; quiche combines a delicate crust with an eggy filling studded with mushrooms; the choucroute is light and crunchy.
The handwritten wine list is barely legible, but it repays perseverance with unusual breadth and very fair prices. There are more than 100 Alsace listings, many under $25, with vintages back to 1983. Bordeaux is abundant, too, with other areas of France also well represented, and 27 wines are available by the glass. Stoeckel is exceptionally adept at finding food matches that show off every nuance of his wines. +++++++++
++The best idea to find a restaurant is to go to a degustation (tasting) at any of the wineries - and many many are open to the public - and ask the folks there what they recommend. Those folks all speak English so no problem if you're not fluent. Bon Appetit!

Jan 30, 2008
NolaTravelers in France