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Strongly dislike.

1 day ago
queenscook in Site Talk

Really overripe bananas

Just following up on the banana cake I made; it was excellent. Thanks for the advice to use them.

1 day ago
queenscook in Home Cooking

Really overripe bananas

I know this is all the current rage, but I had a friend who was doing this 30 years ago, with just bananas. However, these bananas, even frozen, are far beyond processing. They were quite liquidy and would not be able to be processed. If frozen, I'm sure they would be very icy.

However, I did use them for the banana cake I had intended to make all along, which is in the oven as I type this. I'll report back after shabbos on how it came out. Thanks to all for the responses.

Jul 25, 2014
queenscook in Home Cooking

Really overripe bananas

I bought a bag over already overripe bananas a few weeks ago, and put them in the refrigerator untilI could get around to dealing with them (dividing into one-cup measures and freezing). However, life got in the way, and I just finally had some time to take them out. They are beyond overripe: totally soft and translucent. Does anyone know if they are still usable, particularly for banana cake, which was the original plan? They don't smell fermented, by the way, it's just that they're super-soft.

Jul 25, 2014
queenscook in Home Cooking

Do you have a tried 'n' true recipe for avocado (or other) pareve cold soup?

I don't understand your last line; why wouldn't recipes with avocados be good just because avocados have health benefits?

Jul 23, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

ISo great bakery for bday cake - Bronx, Westchester or Manhattan

this was just discussed a few months ago; I suggest you search "parve birthday cakes" for very recent info.

Jul 17, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

Sous vide meat/milk question

Temp shouldn't matter. Even in a hot oven, double wrapped is OK.

Jul 09, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

Do you have a tried 'n' true recipe for avocado (or other) pareve cold soup?

I literally just saw this made on a show called "Let's Dish." It seems to fit the bill . . . served cold, savory, not sweet, and has avocado in it. I have not made it (obviously, since I saw it no more than 10 minutes ago), so I have no idea if it's good or not. It's not my cup of tea, actually, but maybe it's yours.

http://livewellnetwork.com/Lets-Dish/...

Here are two more from the website of the same show:

http://livewellnetwork.com/Lets-Dish/...

http://livewellnetwork.com/Lets-Dish/...

Jul 06, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

Scranton?

My guess would be it's a zip code.

Jul 06, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

Do you have a tried 'n' true recipe for avocado (or other) pareve cold soup?

I make a summer fruit soup we like a lot:

Fruit Soup

nectarines
peaches
plums
apricots
pears
strawberries
blueberries
1 can or jar cherries
1 can pineapple chunks
1 c. sugar
water and/or orange juice

Dice all fresh fruit except strawberries and blueberries. Slice the strawberries, leave the blueberries whole. Add the cherries and pineapple, including the juice. Add the sugar and water/OJ; cook for an hour.
For a thicker soup, divide, puree half, and add back the unpureed half.
Chill.

Note: The amounts of what you put in is up to you, and depends on the size of the fruit, the size of the pot, how much you want to make, how sweet you want it, how thick or thin you want it, and obviously, what you like. I fill a 6 quart pot pretty full up when I make it.

EDIT: Oops . . . just noticed you didn't want sweet. Well, maybe someone else will.

Jul 02, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

Heavenly breakfast in Jerusalem

While it sounds like a nice spread, and I understand that buffets have to cost more to cover those who eat more, I can't imagine eating $35 worth of food at breakfast, especially without the freshly made stuff like omelets, waffles, etc. Would you say that what you ate would have cost a similar amount if you had eaten it in an actual restaurant elsewhere?

A few years ago, I very much enjoyed a brunch buffet at a place called Margot's Cafe, near Beit Shemesh. (I'm not sure if it's still open.) It cost about $20 then, which seemed reasonable, but I still wonder if we all really ate $20 worth of food. We were taken out by friends, and it was the only place to go given certain circumstances, so there wasn't much choice then, but these large breakfast buffets just don't seem worth it to me. YMMV.

Jun 30, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

Cold / Summer Shabbat lunch ideas

I wish my knowledge of the nomenclature of grammar and were better, but I think it has to do with transitive and intransitive verbs, and possibly direct and indirect objects. It's easy enough to read up on it, if you wish.

I would disagree with bagelman somewhat. I don't think we need to say the person is cooking the turkey or the pasta while they are sleeping or in the den watching TV; I think it's better to think of it as the turkey or water is cooking. That does not mean the food is doing (i.e. initiating) the action of cooking; it means the food is being acted upon, and is being cooked during that time, even if the person is doing no action to it.

Jun 30, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

Cold / Summer Shabbat lunch ideas

Perhaps you use English differently than the rest of us. It is as correct to say "The food needs to cook a bit longer" as "The food needs to be cooked a bit longer."

Jun 29, 2014
queenscook in Kosher
1

Question about blintz souffle

Thanks for the answer, though the question was asked a year ago. I made it for Shavous 2013, but didn't see what the big deal is at all; we were very unimpressed. Neither my husband nor I loved it, and it did not make the "make again" list.

Jun 29, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

Cold / Summer Shabbat lunch ideas

This is not entirely true. There are halachot about foods which continue to improve while on a blech and what you are allowed to do with them, to them, etc.; how else would they continue to improve unless some cooking were going on? Another thing: strictly speaking, though I don't think many do this, you can put up raw food (e.g. a cholent) just before shabbos begins. There are specifics on how this is done and what has to be true for one to do it, but the halacha does exist. That food certainly will be cooking on shabbos.

Jun 28, 2014
queenscook in Kosher
2

serengetti. in baltimore

Where is this picture from? Were you there and took a picture of it? (Seems odd to me, but who am I to say?) If so, I know I would appreciate your review/write-up more than a picture of the menu. And if you didn't take this picture, perhaps a link to where it appears would be more helpful than us trying to read this far-too-small picture.

Jun 27, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

Rich foodies, this is for you!

Pardes ceased to do a tasting menu quite some time ago. However, the last time I was there (sadly it's over six months now . . . gotta go back soon), my husband and I shared 8 dishes and the bill was just over $100. (Prior to tax and tip, and no wine.) To me, that's as good as a tasting menu.

Jun 26, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

kosher symbol of cake boss cakes

It would be extremely unlikely that the cRc would "never have heard of it." Large kashrut agencies like the cRc, the OU, and others, are very up on who is behind pretty much every symbol. "Not recommended" is code for "no good," but keeps them out of legal trouble for saying so.

Jun 26, 2014
queenscook in Kosher
1

Cold / Summer Shabbat lunch ideas

Well, no need to post now . . . the link Ari shared is the rub recipe. Thanks, Ari.

Jun 25, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

Cold / Summer Shabbat lunch ideas

Here are the two different recipes; one for the pulled beef brisket, the other for the pulled chicken. I'm pretty sure we've had it for both meals; it should stay fine in a pot on the blech, as long as the flame keeps your blech hot enough. However, they are too wet to put them on the blech on shabbos itself. (Almond Tree, I know you are in Israel, so I will say that I'm not knowledgable about platas, though I know people say they are very hot.)

Texas Oven BBQ Brisket

Ingredients:
1 whole brisket
BBQ Rub (I the recipe for a rub that I got from a course Ari White (of Got Cholent?) gave. I'm not sure if he's OK with giving it here. If he says it's OK, I'll post it. Otherwise, there are dozens, maybe even hundreds, of rub recipes online.

Season raw brisket on both sides with brisket rub seasoning and then place in the roasting pan.
Roast for 1 hour at 350 degrees. Add enough liquid to the roasting pan to achieve ½ inch liquid in the pan. Cover the roasting pan and lower heat to 325 degrees. Continue cooking for 4 - 5 hours, depending on size, basting frequently. (NOTE: I think I wound up cooking it for longer than 6 hours.) Internal temperature of 185 degrees will indicate a fully cooked brisket. Allow brisket to rest for at least 30 minutes. Shred with two forks. Add sauce of choice (I actually have used purchased sauce, but again, many recipes are available online with the flavor profile you might want.)

Barbecue Pulled Chicken
(from Eating Well Feb-March 2006) 8 servings Active Time: 25 minutes Total Time: 5½ hours

Interestingly, the following recipe was actually published as a crockpot recipe, as the OP was looking for, but since I don't use a crockpot, I make it in a pot on the stove, cooking for about 2 hours. If anyone wants to make it in a crockpot, the original recipe calls for cooking on low for about 5 hours. And sorry, but I don't know how people convert that for shabbos use.

8-ounce can (reduced-sodium) tomato sauce
4-ounce can chopped green chiles, drained
3 tablespoons cider vinegar
2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon sweet or smoked paprika
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
2 teaspoons dry mustard
1 teaspoon ground chipotle chile
½ teaspoon salt (omit if using regular tomato sauce)
2½ pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs, trimmed of fat
1 small onion, finely chopped
1 clove garlic, minced

1. Stir tomato sauce, chiles, vinegar, honey, paprika, tomato paste, Worcestershire sauce, mustard, ground chipotle and salt in a 6-quart slow cooker pot until smooth. Add chicken, onion and garlic; stir to combine.
2. Put the lid on and cook on low until the chicken can be pulled apart, about 2 hours.
3. Transfer the chicken to a cutting board and shred with a fork. Return the chicken to the sauce, stir well and serve.

Jun 24, 2014
queenscook in Kosher
1

Cold / Summer Shabbat lunch ideas

I think that other guest was being careful about some specific veggies, like cucumbers or something similar.

Also, the book says "when salting a vegetable salad, one should add a liquid (e.g. oil, salad dressing) to the salad, either after the salting or preferably beforehand)," so no, dressing does not seem to be a problem; in fact, it seems to make it less of a problem.

Jun 24, 2014
queenscook in Kosher
1

Cold / Summer Shabbat lunch ideas

This is probably no help, but I'll mention anyway that I've done pulled beef and pulled chicken, but not in a crockpot. I make it beforehand and leave it on a blech in a pot with enough sauce that it doesn't burn nor dry out.

Jun 24, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

Cold / Summer Shabbat lunch ideas

Protein does not seem to be the distinction. I was once at a shabbos table where another guest wouldn't salt some of the food on his plate, because of this melacha. It seemed quite strange to me so I later looked it up in an English sefer called "The Shabbos Kitchen," which I now have sitting in front of me. In the chapter called "Marinating and Salting" it says "It is forbidden to marinate any food item in a spicy liquid (e.g. vinegar, salt water, pickle brine) on Shabbos. This Rabbinic prohibition was enacted because marinating (or pickling) alters the the quality of the food, and is therefore comparable to cooking. This prohibition applies to all foods, including vegetables (e.g. pickling cucumbers, tomatoes or peppers), fish (e.g. pickling herring) and meat (e.g. corned beef.) None may be marinated on Shabbos."

It goes on to exempt some foods (cooked meat, fish, and eggs, for ex.), and be much more specific about the hows and whys, but this does certainly seem to rule out ceviche.

Jun 24, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

Cold / Summer Shabbat lunch ideas

I would think it is not OK to make it on Shabbat. One of the melachot is pickling, and I'm thinking ceviche would be classified similarly. I'm just guessing, so I certainly could be wrong, but I am not home where I could attempt to look it up.

Jun 24, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

ISO mail order gluten free desserts

Not to belabor the point, but gluten free and kosher for Passover are not at all the same. Matzah, the prototypical kosher for Passover food, is far from gluten free. Many of us--even in these days of taking on more and more chumras, still eat gebrokts--again, by definition not gluten free.

Jun 20, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

ISO mail order gluten free desserts

FYI, they are a totally kosher company. (I love their rainbow cookies on Pesach.)

Jun 19, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

Kosher CSA?!

I guess I forgot that; I had once read their website, but forgot the details.

Jun 18, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

Kosher chef in food network conteast

Then perhaps she just isn't aware of the halachot of keeping kosher even when eating isn't involved. You can't even feed a meat & milk mixture to your pets, for ex.,and you certainly cannot cook it--no matter who is eating it.

Jun 18, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

Kosher chef in food network conteast

I'm assuming she isn't really observant, since from a kosher point of view, it's basically the same issur to cook cheeseburgers as to eat them; I don't really see how kosher-keepers can participate in things like this. For that matter, it's why those who keep strict halacha can't take most non-kosher cooking courses; cooking milk and meat is almost unavoidable. It used to be that dessert classes were pretty safe, but with the current trends of using bacon and lard, even that's not a given anymore.

Jun 18, 2014
queenscook in Kosher

Kosher CSA?!

I'm not really understanding why you're looking for a CSA. A CSA is primarily about fruits and vegetables, and specifically about supporting the local farmers who grow them. There really aren't many kosher farmers raising and shechting animals; Grow and Behold is the only one in the area that I know of.

Jun 18, 2014
queenscook in Kosher