queenscook's Profile

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Kosherica cruises

I said nothing about food. You said you were curious about what add-ons there were, and I said that I heard that BEVERAGES were not included, in other words, that they were an ADD-ON. That's all I know. I have no interest in cruises.

By the way, kosher cruising has been discussed here before. Just search the topic here on the kosher board.

2 days ago
queenscook in Kosher

Kosherica cruises

My understanding is that on most cruises no beverages are included, even water.

2 days ago
queenscook in Kosher

Fairway Market - Woodland Park

Maybe they'll go back to having dairy stuff then?

Apr 21, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

Fairway Market - Woodland Park

I hadn't remembered that conversation until just now, but again, I would ask why you are asking here instead of just asking them (either the person behind the counter or some manager) what the sign refers to, if anything. I would imagine they would be far more knowledgable about their stock than most of the people here on Chowhound. Alternatively, maybe call Rav Marmorstein or his "people."

Apr 21, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

Fairway Market - Woodland Park

When you say there are none, do you mean even bagels and bread? In my experience at the Douglaston branch, the bagel bins have the Mem that is the symbol of Rav Marmorstein's hashgacha, as do the signs near the loaves of bread.

Apr 21, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

UWS NYC odd-kosher-food event

Yes, this is essentially what she reported to me.

Apr 19, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

please help to update our family sedar recipes

So cut small slices.

Apr 19, 2015
queenscook in Kosher
1

please help to update our family sedar recipes

Although having it with peanut butter sounds perfectly fine to me, what about using it to fill a tart? I remember once making a date tart for Pesach with date purée.

Apr 18, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

please help to update our family sedar recipes

It's all about the smell test for me. I leave it In the fridge, and if it starts to smell or look funky, I discard it. Otherwise, it could be there for years!

Apr 18, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

UWS NYC odd-kosher-food event

A friend who went to one of the Mesorah Dinners said the most unusual thing they had was cow udder. She described it as having the consistency of cheese, but was fleishig. She also said that the "locusts" served to all were chocolate, but that there was someone there with actual kosher locusts, who spoke about it, and said he eats them. I think she said the OU wouldn't allow them to be served to all.

Apr 17, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

Kitchen Counter Covers for Pesach

So write on one side: "This side down.". Then you won't make that error.

Easy Vanilla Pudding

Don't know how I managed to post a second rating, but I can't seem to edit or delete it. My previous post, with 3 stars, is the correct one, not this one.

Apr 15, 2015
queenscook in Recipes

Easy Vanilla Pudding

Sorry to say, but I was unimpressed. First off, no pudding skin. And I didn't find the texture all that smooth. I'm wondering if it might have been the butter, because I use a different recipe for chocolate pudding which I like very much. The main difference between the two recipes is the inclusion of butter here.

Apr 15, 2015
queenscook in Recipes

Jarred Tuna

I know I once bought imported tuna from Italy, but it was in a can, not a jar. Sad to say, I don't think I ever ate it, so I can't report on taste.

Apr 13, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

Taking notes to prepare for Pesach next year

re: My 42 year old married niece and her husband were getting grief about having no children and that they should get at it so a great grandchild would be named for mom.

How disgusting, inappropriate, and inconsiderate. Unless they have made public that it is their choice not to have children, the likelihood of infertility or being past the point of ability to have a child is far more likely the issue. The idea that anyone, family or not, would be "giving grief" about such a private issue--and possibly an extremely traumatic one to the
couple--is extremely offensive. Thank God we don't all have families as insensitive.

Apr 12, 2015
queenscook in Kosher
1

KP coke with the yellow caps

If you want to see some interesting stuff, Google "Diet Coke vs. Coke Zero" and read some of the results.

Apr 09, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

Taking notes to prepare for Pesach next year

The question is how much do the raw nuts cost? I didn't buy almonds this year, but the walnuts I bought were $9.00 for 10 oz., which makes $14 a pound, so I wonder how much is really saved.

Apr 09, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

Taking notes to prepare for Pesach next year

Judging from these answers, I do the same. Each year I start a new file, based on the previous year's notes; I have in my computer, all my notes going back to 2002. I have separate lists of food, keylim, menus in each year's folder. I highlight anything that I can't find and need to replace, or need to purchase new for the next year. I do keep some things from year to year: syrups, tea bags, extracts, spices (I'm not going to debate here this issue again; I just don't taste such a major difference, and I have over 20 bottles of spices that I don't plan to buy new each year for the teaspoon I might use), etc., so having the list is very helpful when I make my plans in the weeks prior to the chag. I also write little notes to remind me of things, like "Remember to polish the silver washing cup," and the like.

When I pack up at the end of yomtov, I update the lists with final counts (like: 1/2 bottle of chocolate syrup, 10 Sweet-N-Low packets, 15 mint teabags). It has been more than helpful for the past 13 years.

I also try to label boxes well. I use the heavy-duty shmura matzah boxes to store lots of stuff, so I have stacks of boxes with writing all over them: ice cube trays, potholders, corkscrew, etc.

Apr 09, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

Passover with jaw wired shut -- general suggestions plus specific info on immersion blender

How is this only "somewhat related" and not staying on track? Chompie was answering the part of the OP's post which said:

"Also, I have a small KLP food processor which I would like to keep pareve if possible. Would an immersion blender be strong enough to grind up beef long-simmered in soup? How about chicken? (He's craving meaty flavors.)"

Anyone else who also wanted to grind meat could benefit from knowing that the Ninja Master Prep (whatever that is) can accomplish this.

Apr 08, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

Spice-flavored liqueur

This is my first post on this board (I usually hang out on the Kosher board), so I hope it is an appropriate question to ask here.

I just purchased a (kosher for Passover) liqueur called Besamim-Aromatic Spice Liqueur, which has flavors of cinnamon, cloves, and the like. However, the clove flavor is a bit overwhelming, and I don't love cloves. I do, however, very much like cinnamon, and was thinking of putting a cinnamon stick or two in the bottle to help counteract the heavy clove flavor. My question: A) can I assume this would work, and B) is there any reason why I shouldn't do this?

Apr 08, 2015
queenscook in Spirits

Passover with jaw wired shut -- general suggestions plus specific info on immersion blender

The beauty of Chowhound is that the threads provide information for many people who may have the same question as an OP. There very well may be some other person who comes along with the same need for pureeing or liquifying solids who do actually live in the US. I submit that providing information towards that end is far from meaningless, but in fact, quite helpful.

Last Pesach, in my own family, a relative was not able to eat solid food because of a swallowing issue, and was only eating pureed foods and moistened matzah. This year, unfortunately, this relative is only on a tube feed, but why you would think this OP is the only one reading here who might have this issue is beyond me.

Apr 08, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

Manischewitz, Lieber's, etc. How do they do it?

I don't use plain tomato sauce itself for anything, but I do find the pasta sauces comparable to what I use during the year. I just made a lasagna yesterday, and tasted the sauce before I layered it, and was thinking that I probably should use the brand during the year. I seem to recall a brand of salad dressing that was also pretty good (maybe Blanchard & Blanchard?), but even during the year, I find it easier to make my own with olive oil, vinegar, and various add-ins (honey, OJ, spices, fresh herbs, etc.) than buying. Mayo is probably where I'd most likely agree; I think they continue to use cottonseed oil instead of olive for Pesach mayo. It's just that I haven't used mayo for anything over Pesach in a few years, so I don't really notice it.

Apr 08, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

2015 the year "Gluten Free" got top billing, outpacing "No gebrokhts"

I wonder if it contributes to less post-Pesach markdowns?

Apr 08, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

Manischewitz, Lieber's, etc. How do they do it?

What kind of items are you referring to? Are they things which just really can't be made well without regular chametz or kitniot ingredients? I think things like imitation soy sauce and mustard are just never going to be good for Pesach because of the nature of the items themselves.

Apr 08, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

Wanted: good recipe for bars or cake using matza cake meal

I'm hoping you'll report back with what you thought, if you make any of these.

Apr 07, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

Wanted: good recipe for bars or cake using matza cake meal

I have said before, and I will say again, that I guess I'm in the minority, but I feel very strongly that it's the potato starch cakes that taste awful. They are dry and usually tasteless.

Here's one of the most flavorful cakes I make, and I have no problem finishing it even after yom tov, if there are leftovers. Here's what I wrote about it the first time I made it:

I made Arthur Schwartz' Apple Cake this year for the first time
and cannot believe how easy or good it was. It's one of the few Pesach cakes I can ever remember that did not require the eggs to be separated. I ate the last piece yesterday, and it was still moist and tasty. The recipe is all over the internet. And don't leave out the raisins, even though it says they're optional; they really add to it.

ARTHUR SCHWARTZ'S APPLE CAKE

Makes one 8-inch-square cake

Topping:
½ cup coarsely chopped walnuts or pecans
¾ cup sugar
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon or a combination of ground cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger

Cake:
3 eggs
¾ cup sugar
1/3 cup vegetable oil
¾ cup matzo cake meal
5 medium apples, peeled, cored, halved, and cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices (about 5 cups), preferably Golden Delicious, Crispin (Mutzu), or other apples that keep their shape when cooked
1/3 cup raisins (optional)

Position an oven rack in the center of the oven. Preheat the oven to 350 F. Lightly oil an 8-inch-square glass baking dish.

To prepare the topping, mix together the walnuts, sugar, and cinnamon in a small bowl; set aside.

To prepare the cake batter, in a bowl, with a hand-held electric mixer, beat the eggs on medium speed until well mixed. Beat in the sugar, about 2 tablespoons at a time, beating until the mixture is thick and foamy. Beat in the oil, adding it in a steady stream. Scrape down the bowl with a rubber spatula. With the spatula, stir in the matzo cake meal, blending well.

Pour half of the batter mixture into the prepared pan. Sprinkle about half the topping mixture evenly over the batter. Top with half the apples and all the raisins. Scrape the remaining half of the batter over the apples, spreading it out to cover the apples. Arrange the remaining apples on top of the batter. Sprinkle evenly with the remaining topping mixture.

Bake for 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until the sides of the cake pull away very slightly from the baking dish and the topping has begun to caramelize. (A cake tester is not reliable. It will not come out clean due to the moist richness of this cake.) Let sit in the baking dish for several hours until completely cool before cutting into serving portions. This cake is yet another Yiddish food that improves with age. Keep the cake in its dish, covered tightly with plastic, and the next day the topping will have become a moist, candy-like coating.

Here are a couple of others:

BAKLAVA CAKE

CAKE:
Cooking spray
¾ cup sugar
¼ cup packed brown sugar
2 T. vegetable oil
3 egg whites
2 eggs
½ cup matzo cake meal
½ cup finely chopped walnuts
¼ cup finely chopped hazelnuts
3 T. fresh orange juice
¼ tsp. salt
¼ tsp. ground cinnamon

SYRUP:
2/3 cup sugar
¼ cup honey
1/3 cup fresh orange juice
3 T. water
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
¼ tsp. ground cinnamon

Preheat oven to 350°.

CAKE:
Coat a 7” springform or 9” round cake pan with cooking spray. Place 3/4 cup sugar, brown sugar, oil, egg whites, and eggs in a large bowl; beat at medium speed 2 minutes. Stir in matzo cake meal, walnuts, hazelnuts, orange juice, salt, and cinnamon, beating until well blended. Pour into prepared pan; bake at 350° for 35 minutes or until cake springs back when lightly touched. Cool completely. (Needs to bake for longer, and even after a long time, the center doesn’t test dry.)
SYRUP:
Combine all ingredients in a heavy saucepan; bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 25 minutes or until slightly thick, stirring occasionally. Cool completely. Pierce top of cake several times with a fork; pour syrup over cake. Cover and chill.

PECAN BARS

CRUST:
1 cup matzo cake meal
½ cup matzo meal
1 cup packed brown sugar
¼ cup ground toasted pecans
½ tsp. ground cinnamon
¼ tsp. salt
6 T. margarine
2 egg white
Cooking spray

FILLING:
1 1/3 cups packed brown sugar
½ cup maple syrup
2 T. margarine, melted
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1 tsp. fresh lemon juice
1/8 tsp. salt
5 egg whites
1 egg
2 T. finely chopped pecans

Preheat oven to 350°.

Crust:
Combine matzo cake meal, matzo meal, brown sugar, pecans, cinnamon, and salt. Cut in 6 T. margarine with a pastry blender or 2 knives until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add 2 egg whites, stirring just until moist; press into bottom of a 13 x 9-inch baking pan coated with cooking spray. Bake 20 minutes or until edges begin to brown; cool 15 minutes.

Filling:
Combine 1 1/3 cups brown sugar, maple syrup, margarine, vanilla, lemon juice, salt, egg whites, and egg in medium bowl, stirring well with a whisk. Stir in coconut and pecans. Pour over the prepared crust. Bake at 350° for 30 minutes or until set. Cool to room temperature. Cover and chill at least 1 hour. Cut into bars.

I also once made a very successful Lemon Squares recipe, but I can't seem to find the recipe I used.

Apr 07, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

Holyland Matzo - where to find in NYC?

For anyone still looking for this, I just saw some in Amazing Savings in KGH.

Apr 07, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

Passover with jaw wired shut -- general suggestions plus specific info on immersion blender

Actually, that info is not in this thread.

Apr 03, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

please help to update our family sedar recipes

So you don't dip the maror into the charoset?

Apr 02, 2015
queenscook in Kosher

please help to update our family sedar recipes

I just think Medjools would puree more easily; I find the cheaper dates to have more and thicker skin, and more dried-out flesh. I think you'd net more by using dates with softer flesh.

Apr 01, 2015
queenscook in Kosher