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Best Fried Chicken and Waffles SOUTH of 96th st!

Someone help me out here: I never knew fried chicken and waffles was a thing. Where' sit from? Waffles with butter, syrup?

Yours,
Intrigued

Sep 06, 2014
rbraham in Manhattan

Blood sausage in NYC?

I forgot about this thread--and forgot how much I liked blood pudding.

Thanks!

Sep 05, 2014
rbraham in Manhattan

Can I use potato starch to brown beef (not for thickening)?

Passover coming up. Could use tomato paste, I suppose, or kick it off with straight caramelization (sugar, cola).

Is it worth futzing with?

Rob

Apr 10, 2014
rbraham in Home Cooking

oh no, pork jowls

Wait, that means my post is false...

I've used the jowl fat for the custom-percent portion to the lean pork/veal, and the "stiffer" _backfat_ for the embedded chunks. Admittedly, I'm a sucker for fat (caul, leaf, suet also clogging my freezer).

Mar 11, 2014
rbraham in Home Cooking

oh no, pork jowls

Like meatloaf? Trip the light fantastic and move to terrines and pates.

Pork jowl is the better alternative in all recipes where they call for back fat to grind with pork or veal. They don't call for it because for most of us poor slobs it's hard to find.

For a garnish as an exposed, cooked smidgen of fat -- as in mortadella -- stick with back fat.

It's hard to stop when you get into terrines, pork, duck, whatever....

Also, they freeze perfectly, of course.

Mar 11, 2014
rbraham in Home Cooking

Suffocated or strangled ducks: where can I buy?

OP here.

I'm following this with great interest, and appreciate the replies and general interest.

I am still pressed for time, so cannot take part as much as I would like. (I just wrote that without intending it to be a pun....)

I will reply a little bit longer as I sort things out by me.

Again, thanks.

Rob

Feb 28, 2014
rbraham in General Topics

Where can I buy a Girolle?

Why are we talking to a zombie cheesehead?

Feb 20, 2014
rbraham in General Topics

Where can I buy a Girolle?

Huh. Invented in 1982. Not ancient artisanal manufacture (cf chitarra).

History of girolle:
http://www.girolle.ch/en/historique.html

(Trying to redeem myself.)

Feb 20, 2014
rbraham in General Topics

Where can I buy a Girolle?

Green market at the back of Chelsea market.

$29/lb. this week beautiful fresh like daisies.

Aka chanterelles.

In case anyone read the OP wrong.
Unlike me. Definitely not me.
But their mushrooms are always great...

Feb 20, 2014
rbraham in General Topics

Suffocated or strangled ducks: where can I buy?

Hi,

See subject. I am assuming all the ducks I buy, of any breed, are bled.

Just curious. I'm sure I can live w/o it, or move to Rouen, but I'm sure it has a funkier taste.

Rob

Feb 17, 2014
rbraham in General Topics

Dinner w/ crisped duck confit--adding foie gras (pate? warm?) somewhere in menu too much?

Coincidence of his death with my birthday with round numbers, celebrate our (everybody's) lives eat, drink, and be merry, mortality, etc.

Thanks for the heads up on the morels. Thing is, hydrated shiitakes are killer...

The story so far, with changes coming fast and furious. About the soup: 12 quails--$10 a six-pack!--one partridge, one guinea hen now in fridge. Looked for a squab, which I would have had to sneak by my wife, but they didn't have. ("No pigeons, no rabbit." Also no skate, ever ever, but that's another story.)

I find deboning kind of therapeutic. I guess I'll freeze the breasts, save some of the meat for the clarification/refueling.

About the wine: sherry. Duh. Next to Port, next to Madeira (which I can't afford) my favorite. Looked into Amontillado, found a Byass "Del Duque" I wanted to try.

But...watch closely here: working backwards, I'm too tired, and w/ all the wine, I think everyone will be, for the duck confit w/ de Puy lentils, now aging in the pantry. So, back to frisée, endive, whatever. In consultation with my extraordinary wine guy--who knows food inside out--Pierre, recently promoted to manager at Sherry-Lehman, the Hermitage is just to big. So he's calling for a Pinot Noir of some sort (just got off the phone). Hermitage goes back to store.

I'm torn--pleasantly, of course--on the transition Sauterne--Sherry--Pinot Noir (suggested). The amontillado does have some acidity, which is good, but another really nice set up with the consommé would be a Meursault. Right? Also less rocky road for my guests, who (like me) have never had three wines at one meal. Plus maybe a Port I've been saving. (The problem with the expensive ports I buy is I don't have people to drink them with (world's tiniest violin), and the opened bottle goes pfff.)

Actually, perhaps no port/cheese, but as you say a Demi-sec with a tart. Riesling? Or, hell, champagne? Won't have to be expensive, I plan to be drunk anyway by then.

Feb 05, 2014
rbraham in Home Cooking

Dinner w/ crisped duck confit--adding foie gras (pate? warm?) somewhere in menu too much?

Well fuck it. I bought a 1.3 lb lobe of Hudson Valley, $84 from a Whole Food; needed A quality like a whole in the head, but had no time to order on-line from non-Hudson. Will make torchon--Kenjie's Food Labs
http://www.seriouseats.com/2012/12/th...
seems to cut through a lot of crap. Not sure what compote/marmelade, but, consider, amici:

I'm thinking going straight from cool torchon with a Sauterne to confit/Hermitage is too brutal. So, next course will be a game consommé, and I'll throw a few mushrooms on top. Question: are reconstituted morels tasty in such an exposed context?--maybe hydrated with booze; otherwise a chanterelle or two.
Then the crisped confit on a sharp salad. Then a fruit tart. Then, maybe, cheese.

What this means then, is kissing goodby dropping big bucks on a half-bot of Yquem, going for a more human Sauterne, but now I need more help: a wine for the consommé , sort of a transition.

Champagne for the tart?

I have some killer port for the cheese.

TMI: I have two best friends, the older of the two died this week, and the other and his wife are coming over. You get the picture.

And, FWIW: remember I said I was so proud of my duck pate (which has jack-all to do with OP) and I offered it to fly free on the wings of the Net? Well, I did a Google of foie gras duck confit and there it was!

So, to readers here and to hovering mods, if any, I acknowledge the following is pure threadshitting, if not Internet-shitting (not a new concept), for future Google searches of OP topic: an image that may pertinent:

Feb 04, 2014
rbraham in Home Cooking

Dinner w/ crisped duck confit--adding foie gras (pate? warm?) somewhere in menu too much?

Thanks to all fans and those playing along at home.

Cromesquis, hmm. Idea of celeriac also good, I was thinking the mushroom soup would be too dark, heavy, followed by confit/lentils (but maybe not on a frisée something or other.

Then I thought instead starting with some bird/veal/ sweatbread trrrine with either bird or veal-pork farce. I do love me some sweetbreads, but I've never had them cold, but then I could switch up the game bird thing. (Now I'm really turning into the boy who took all his Chrisas toys to bed with him.

You know, obviously I could do up a foie gras pate straight up (which intimidates me), serve it with something or other.

Cromesquis sound scary, like deep-fried butter pats (which even Escoffier makes fun of). Chef Simon and others talk about it. Is the foi raw or mi-cuit?

Now thinking: 86 the mushroom. Celeriac soup w/ cromesquis, or begin with pate and cromesquis same plate, straight to confit.

If I do a pate I might go out and buy a breakdown ridge mold and try my first en croute.

Rob

Feb 04, 2014
rbraham in Home Cooking

Dinner w/ crisped duck confit--adding foie gras (pate? warm?) somewhere in menu too much?

You know, by some miracle I had a clarified and reduced to jelly stock from carcasses of partridges and guinea hen (to which I added a duck and squab carcass and bubbled), which I added to a pate (see my show-off, and saved a little to try my first aspic on top of it). Point is, it was amazing, so I'm intrigued.

But, interestingly, I absolutely hate duck soup. I tried twice in honor of the Marx Brothers; I don't even like Chinese roasted duck added to noodles at a restaurant.

Partridges, squabs, quail, and guinea hens are sinfully cheap (relatively speaking) in Chinatown, so I could do it and find eminently tasty results with the meat.

Decisions, decisions...

Rob

Feb 01, 2014
rbraham in Home Cooking

Dinner w/ crisped duck confit--adding foie gras (pate? warm?) somewhere in menu too much?

One leg (thigh and drumstick) each.

Rob

Feb 01, 2014
rbraham in Home Cooking

Dinner w/ crisped duck confit--adding foie gras (pate? warm?) somewhere in menu too much?

Also, since this the right crowd, and it actually crossed my mind to serve it, and since I'm so proud I'm showing it off to anyone I can corner, and the Internet will record it forever, a duck/squab pate with squab inlay and dried apricots soaked in Port and Cognac and other stuff:

Feb 01, 2014
rbraham in Home Cooking

Dinner w/ crisped duck confit--adding foie gras (pate? warm?) somewhere in menu too much?

Haven't thought of rest of menu, probably just a tart of some kind. I just bought Wolfert revised, and was gifted Memories of Gascony, by Pierre Koffman, which by title is the kind of book I avoid, but is very hard-core and recipe rich (trans. from French, apparently he's a star there).

Which is where I heard of Monbazillac. And Madiran, dont'cha know, but my guy had better wine available, and I won't die if I don't do the whole cutesy culture-match thing and wear berets and what not.

But of course I had the confit mouldering away anyway.

So this is what I'm thinking. An update of a prep I did before: a mushroom soup with croutons of foie gras. It wasn't a velouté, per se, but following Peterson (either in Soups or Glorious French) based on a mess of puréed smothered onions, and maybe a sprinkling of flour, but I can't remember. Spring (or was it Fall) was in the air, and fresh morels were to be had, so those were them, and as Peterson had a throwaway line for those in the mood to stuff a few morels with the fatty organ and scatter them about with a careless air.

I went with shavings, curled leaves in intent, of cold-ish foie gras placed on the soup surface. Verdict: not as great as it should have been. Taste was killer, but leaves melted too fast, or, if thicker, sank like a stone into the deep muddy. I tried cutting to torchon colder, but all I got was flakes and expensive shards.

So I'm thinking maybe some cutouts of some bread or other with a thinnish slice of foie gras. The soup to be graced with a thread of walnut oil, which I've never tasted before and am having trouble taste-visualizing (as it were), but sounds like it would be good and goes with that whole SW thing, and I think one or the other of those two authors mentioned it.

I'll go for chanterelles this time. Now, about wine....?

Awaiting your advice and approval.

Rob

Feb 01, 2014
rbraham in Home Cooking

Dinner w/ crisped duck confit--adding foie gras (pate? warm?) somewhere in menu too much?

My birthday? Check.

Moulard confit untouched in fat in fridge for three months? Check.

Bottle of expensive Hermitage bought? Check.

Desire for foie gras: high.

Willingness to spring for Monbazillac or Sauternes: check.

Willingness to screw up menu for gilding the lily (even for Wolfert?): None.

Any ideas?

Rob

Where can I buy double cream in Manhattan?

Thanks to all.

About fat content of creams (and other dairy products), see the terrific graphic in
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cream

I checked a couple of England sites for more details and French-language ones for creme fraiche-- unfortunately the Wiki chart doesn't list it.

Bottom line: the hell with it.
Top line: I bought creme fraiche starter (which doubles as mascarpone starter, which is informative, I think) from a cheeses making shop online (New England something), popped it in at 82° and am in fat city. (The warmish initial temp makes a big difference.) The company says use half-and-half, but so what.

Rob

Jan 31, 2014
rbraham in Manhattan

Jarlsberg?

Guys,

Thanks. Good to know.

Epilogue of drama: I just checked, and I must've thrown it out in a frenzy of refrigerator cleaning.

Anyone come up with a moral to this whole event?

Rob

Jan 31, 2014
rbraham in Cheese

Where can I buy double cream in Manhattan?

Feeling the need for fat. Not clotted, just fattier. Creme fraiche d'Isigny clocks in at around 40%, I think. Higher than heavy cream at 36%, but not that much higher for the fancy mark-up.

Seen any?

Jan 15, 2014
rbraham in Manhattan

Jarlsberg?

Not a reply, but a question to cheeseheads and Jarlsbergers, since you're all gathered here:

I have a rock solid block of Jarlsberg. Will it melt grated? How about as one piece in a nuke?

Would it help if it is in a warm bath of wine, a la fondue?

I also have some fresh Gruyere hanging around, so if it needs some kindling...

Basically just don't want to throw it out unnecessarily.

Thanks,
Rob

Jan 10, 2014
rbraham in Cheese

Oil in pasta water yes or no?

It is a sound idea to add to the pasta, after it has been drained, a bit of butter or olive oil, depending on the sauce it will be served with.

Jan 04, 2014
rbraham in Home Cooking

Fresh (not bottled/brined) fig leaves for sale?

Thanks for the replies.

Kalustyan's was the first place I tried. Grape leaves, fig leaves, I'm easy. Maybe Astoria. Gotta hit the Net, also, I guess.

Rob

Jan 03, 2014
rbraham in Manhattan

Marzipan pigs?

Yeah, I was going to say that Italian specialty shop also.

They're nice people. If you're in the area, stop by and tell them you love them (the marzipan) and ask the name of who makes it, and give _them_ a call.

Couldn't hurt, and you might learn a lot about marzipan, which also couldn't hurt, I don't think.

Rob

Jan 01, 2014
rbraham in Manhattan

Fresh (not bottled/brined) fig leaves for sale?

Can't find any. Am feeling creative.

Any ideas?

Rob

Jan 01, 2014
rbraham in Manhattan

What copper cookware brand do you recommend (Mauviel or Falk)

The hell with the pan, I want that custom-crate! What a bargain!

Interesting marketing. Fun comparison: Brooklyn Copper, http://www.brooklyncoppercookware.com, which shows the enthusiasm of the nearly crazed lover of copper craft and cooking (not saying BC's site is any better; it's good/fun for us, but not directly at the deep pockets).

Note the near-outright lie when they actually say anything about the materials (beyond that copper's a splurge/luxury, reminiscent of Babette's Feast, etc): tin's original, copper has good hurst conduction, and __iron's different because "its heat conduction is different [ok, true enough], and makes the iron handle cooler [implied "cooler" than handles in pans used by the lower classes, or simply cool in general.__ Neither true, of course.

Rob

Jan 01, 2014
rbraham in Cookware

Falk Review

When last I spoke to Mac, quite recently, he was full of stories about scouring the countryside of Ohio for metallurgists and machine designers--rich pickings, apparently, because of the huge sub-contracting industry for Detroit, when Detroit was Detroit. He's hired some old-timers who still have the skillz, and the engineer is building the shop from ground up to his and Mac's specs.

His plan is to keep a sales/showroom office in NYC. (Hey, Brooklyn, right?) I never asked him, frankly, if he is open for business _right now_; my guess is he still is. I'll drop him a line.

Rob

Nov 15, 2013
rbraham in Cookware

Copper pots better? why?

Sure thing. He's a good guy, even returned Celan I loaned him :).

Oh, BTW: (small, almost greyed-out print here)....

(bought an Anova circulator...the Dark Side is inviting me in....)

Rob

Nov 14, 2013
rbraham in Cookware

What copper cookware brand do you recommend (Mauviel or Falk)

Mauviel, of the two. Take a look at a recent review of Falk:
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/888585

Nov 14, 2013
rbraham in Cookware