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Help - newby cook vs finicky eater

I also just want to add, there's a big tendency as a new cook to try to season / flavor / sauce everything. You'll be well served to learn about different types and cuts of meat and how to cook them. There are tons of different kinds of meat (and even seafood) that don't need anything beyond salt & pepper to be very flavorful.

Feb 28, 2008
LawSchoolGuy in Home Cooking

Help - newby cook vs finicky eater

If your theory is correct, have you tried probiotics? My mother had a similar problem in not being able to eat anything that was greasy or had a high fat content (yet she had no problem with her gall bladder). She also couldn't tolerate too much dairy. Now she just takes a couple probiotic pills with her meals, and she's free to indulge again.

Feb 28, 2008
LawSchoolGuy in Home Cooking

How To Use Rice Cooker

Yeah, there should be a removable bowl - putting water directly on the heating element is likely to at the very least ruin the rice cooker.

I just do the normal 2:1 proportions and don't pay too much mind to the lines on the side of the bowl. All the rice cooker is doing is bringing it up to a boil and then reducing to a simmer, like you would if you manually did it on the stove. Sometimes I'll throw in stock, butter, oil, spices, whatever, again, just as if its being done on the stove.

Also, as noted above, rinsing the rice first is a great idea.

Edit: As Miss Needle points out, different rices use different proportions, as well as the amount of rice being made.

Feb 28, 2008
LawSchoolGuy in Home Cooking

So, what did you make this weekend?

These ribs:

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

I'd probably try pork ribs next time. Also, had to use the broiler instead of the grill, and added 2x red pepper and some liquid smoke to the sauce. Also did 1/4 cup honey, 1/4 cup molasses.

Feb 28, 2008
LawSchoolGuy in Home Cooking

Cookbooks for newlyweds first time out of home?

All good advice - pictures are a huge help.

Feb 20, 2008
LawSchoolGuy in Home Cooking

Cookbooks for newlyweds first time out of home?

I have to second (third?) the recommendation for The New Best Recipes from Cooks Illustrated / America's Test Kitchen:

http://www.amazon.com/New-Best-Recipe...

This book literally taught me to cook (from not even knowing that you need to season meat with salt before you cook it). It has many staple recipes / sides / sauces that you can mix and match.

The best part about this cookbook though are the explanations before each recipe as to why they do it a certain way, what other methods are and their advantages / disadvantages and illustrated technique sections (trussing a chicken, four steps to making a pan sauce, etc. It explains all the basics: what is pan-roasting, sauteing, baking, etc. and what the methods are used for, different types of cuts, different types of pans.

I really can't recommend it enough for a brand-new beginning cook.

(P.S. I found the Williams-Sonoma Bride and Groom Cookbook cute but not very useful. Then again, I dislike pretty much all of the Williams-Sonoma cookbooks).

Feb 20, 2008
LawSchoolGuy in Home Cooking

What are Chowhounds having for dinner tonight?

Really? Wow. I don't think I have any of the ingredients needed to make that, except maybe the mustard.

Jan 24, 2008
LawSchoolGuy in Home Cooking

What are Chowhounds having for dinner tonight?

Maple glaze sounds good - I agree the canned cranberry sauce didn't work well.

I made a mistake above - I waited for the rice to cool enough to handle (can't stuff well without using hands), used tongs/hands on the birds (really weren't even that hot since I was just giving the skin some color)

Jan 24, 2008
LawSchoolGuy in Home Cooking

What are Chowhounds having for dinner tonight?

We had individual roasted game hens stuffed with a sausage/pecan rice stuffing, topped with a cranberry sauce. Turned out great!

Stuffing: mirepoix, then add rice and liquid of 1/2 chicken stock, 1/2 water*. Separately saute bacon, dice some kielbasa sausage (what I had on hand). Chop some pecans (left over from a pecan pie). When rice is done, mixed all together.

Game hens: Mix together butter and thyme, spread all over hens. Sear all sides in a pan (got to use my brand new 13" all-clad pan I got for Christmas =). Let cool, stuff with rice. Roast at 400 for 30 min. or so. While they were roasting, deglaze pan with some white wine. Add some chicken stock and a can of whole-berry cranberry sauce (didn't have any dried cranberries or cranberry juice).

Sauce wasn't quite what I was looking for - too sweet. Still good, but next time I'll use dried cranberries and cranberry juice, or maybe port.

* Note: I use Kitchen Basics Chicken Stock (which is by far the best imo, other than homemade). If I use only chicken stock for the rice its a little strong.

Jan 24, 2008
LawSchoolGuy in Home Cooking

"California" style sushi in DC area?

Thanks everyone. We'll probably end up trying Koi Koi first, as its closest. I can promise you we'll end up trying every restaurant listed here. I'll make sure to post our experiences in case anyone else is looking for non-traditional sushi. =)

"California" style sushi in DC area?

Hi all,

My wife and I moved to the area recently from California and have been trying to find a new go-to sushi place (we used to go probably once a week). All of the recommended restaurants though seem to be much more traditional than what we like - I know, we're certainly not purists.

For an idea, here is the menu at our old favorite in Santa Cruz: http://mobosushirestaurant.com/menu.h.... This is our favorite when we're visiting family in Las Vegas: http://www.sushi-mon.com/. We're really just looking for a place that serves more than just one type of fish + rice. We like all those non-traditional ingredients: cream cheese, macadamia nuts, tempura'd rolls, yum-yum scallop...I'm getting hungry just thinking about it. =

)

Anyone know a place like that? If it makes a difference, we're in Arlington, but we'll drive pretty far to get some sushi.

Thanks in advance for the help.