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Can I substitute celery root for celery?

No hard and fast rules here, but we tend to use celery in spring/summer soups and celeriac in autumn/winter ones.

And, of course, any celeriac not used gets grated and turned through a remoulade sauce. Classic!

about 19 hours ago
Harters in Home Cooking

What's for Dinner #328 - The It's Fall Edition!

Upcoming......pasties

I'll make a very short pastry, using a lard/butter combo. Which is about as creative as this gets. Purists will cry "foul" but I always use a tin of stewing steak for this, rather than fresh meat - just because I always have (and doing this recipe goes back to the olden days when recipes weren't in metric). Very fine dice of onion, potato and carrot get mixed in with the meat. Gets about 30 minutes in the oven at 180. The recipe makes four, so that's two for the freezer brown gloop drawer.

Accompaniments will be as tradition in this house demands - tin of baked beans for me; just HP sauce for herself.

Pears & cheddar for afters.

What's for Dinner #328 - The It's Fall Edition!

I saw that episode and it does look like a pukka steak sandwich - a steak sandwich by which all steak sandwiches should be judged.

1 day ago
Harters in Home Cooking

[Didsbury, Manchester] No. 4

Spotted they did Sunday brunch, starting at 11am, leading into a lunch service starting at about 12.30.

Went for the former. The (very) Full English for herself. Corned beef hash, topped with streaky bacon and a fried egg for me. Both good.

Place grows on me.

1 day ago
Harters in U.K./Ireland
1

whats your go-to salsa recipe?

Red onion, tomatoes, chillis, coriander leaves, lime juice.

2 days ago
Harters in Home Cooking

What's for Dinner #328 - The It's Fall Edition!

Well, yesterday's exercise in modern day hunter gathering proved a success. The fishmonger yielded up some lovely big fillets of coley and another of tuna. They're now in the freezer. There was also a kilo of North Wales mussels. They'll get cooked in the classic Belgian way - onion, white wine, parsley. But just served with crusty bread, instead of the classic mayo and fries.

Cotswolds

At some point, you're bound to come across the Lords of the Manor at Upper Slaughter. One to pass over, IMO, in spite of its just retained Michelin star. http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/9106...

One to try - Horse & Groom at Moreton in Marsh

Sep 27, 2014
Harters in U.K./Ireland

Thinking of going to Bibendum for oysters or somewhere else?

Ah - didnt know that they had an oyster bar. I'll just slink off quietly back to the northwest.

Sep 27, 2014
Harters in U.K./Ireland

ISO, Excellent, Sweet Unsmoked Spanish Paprika

No. Apologies - I hadnt read your post properly. For unsmoked, I usually use supermarket "own label" Hungarian paprika.

Sep 27, 2014
Harters in General Topics

ISO, Excellent, Sweet Unsmoked Spanish Paprika

La Chinata is the one generally available to me.

Sep 27, 2014
Harters in General Topics

Does every meal out have to be so Chowish or not?

How can everything always be perfect?

When I'm writing a restaurant review, I quite like it when there's something to be critical about. Obviously nothing major.

Sep 27, 2014
Harters in General Topics
1

Thinking of going to Bibendum for oysters or somewhere else?

Might you not be better going to a seafood specialist, such as J Sheekey?

Sep 27, 2014
Harters in U.K./Ireland

London’s Nobu loses Michelin star status

I see Holbeck Ghyll hasnt yet changed its Michelin mention.

I understand why places may be deliberately dilatory in doing this (not that I'm suggesting that any who have lost their stars are doing this). I have twice contacted Michelin about this - once a place kept saying it held a Bib Gourmand for several years after it had actually held one. And, in the other case, there was another no longer valid claim that it was a "Rising Star". In both cases, websites were amended within days of me contacting Michelin.

Sep 27, 2014
Harters in U.K./Ireland

What's for Dinner #328 - The It's Fall Edition!

There's beef shanks to braise. Now, we're very familiar with lamb shanks but this is the first time we've come across a bovine version. The meat's shin beef, which is what we'd usually use for stew, so we'll braise it with our usual stew veg - carrot, onion, celery. Probably a mix of red wine and beef stock. And I suspect it's going to take forever to cook - probably 3+ hours. To accompany, spuds in some form and steamed cabbage (we've got one of those pointed ones - hispi?)

There'll be potted shrimps to start, And herself has discovered some lemon polenta cake lurking in the brown gloop freezer drawer that'll do very nicely for dessert.

We're off on a mussel hunt this afternoon - the local fishmonger rarely has them, so we're trying another shop a few minutes drive away. If we score then that's tomorrow dinner sorted.

The Twelve Weeks of Christmas

Oh, we athiests celebrate Christmas with enthusiasm. As far as I'm concerned, anything involving large quantities of food - and presents - is worth giving some time to.

Spelling errors on menus and websites

I assume whoever wrote "pre-fix menu" does not speak French which is understandable as I assume that the OP is in an English speaking country. In which case you have to ask why on earth the restaurant just doesn't use the English phrase "fixed price menu".

The phrase "prix fixe menu" has always struck me as odd, as you don't generally see it in France, where it's usually just "menu"

Sep 26, 2014
Harters in Not About Food

What's for Dinner #328 - The It's Fall Edition!

Upcoming.....pulled pork sandwiches, coleslaw, spicy mixed beans.

None of it home cooked. Bought and will be nuked as appropriate.

Michelin 2015 guide shines star spotlight outside London | decanter.com

Already commented on the other Michelin thread - http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/990311

Sep 26, 2014
Harters in U.K./Ireland

Skye’s the limit for island as second restaurant awarded Michelin stars

Sort of surprised that neither the French at the Midland nor Manchester House get stars. Only sort of, because there seems to have been an anti-Manchester bias for some years - perhaps evidenced by the fact that Rogan wins a star for his London place, but not for the longer established Manc one. I've been similarly sort of surprised in the past when Michael Caines didnt win one for his place at the Manchester Abode. Or when Aumbry didnt win one. All four places well on a par with star holders, if not surpassing some that I know.

Perhaps further evidence, if such was needed, of the decreasing relevance of Michelin to folk's eating decisions.

Sep 26, 2014
Harters in U.K./Ireland

What's for Dinner #327-The Scotland Votes Edition! [through September 25, 2014]

Dinner proved to be OK, but nothing more. Not a keeper.

Sep 26, 2014
Harters in Home Cooking

What's for Dinner #327-The Scotland Votes Edition! [through September 25, 2014]

In the quest to find something new to try for dinner, you have fantastic success and fantastic failure, although most are just fine but not keepers. Then there's the ones where you're just not that sure about it - you cut the recipe out of the magazine months ago but, when you re-read it,you just think "meh, but we'll try it anyway". So it is tonight.

It's all done in the oven. Slices of potato and red pepper get a toss in olive oil and finely chopped rosemary (I'm going to have to buy a new rosemary next year, the present one looks most unhappy with life). They go on non-stick baking tray and get 25 minutes or so at 180. A couple of sea bass fillets then go on top and a scattering of sliced black olives go in. A drizzle of oil and another few minutes cooking till the fish is done. Final scatting of basil leaves.

For "afters".....Cheddar, Red Leicester & heritage apples (http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/989496)

What's for Dinner #327-The Scotland Votes Edition! [through September 25, 2014]

Good call, JM.

Sep 24, 2014
Harters in Home Cooking

Kerridge To Open New Gastropub

Right. So that's one place I won't be trying.

No reservation pubs are fine when they are catering to folk who live in the immediate area and who can easily nip to the local Pizza Express if they can't get a table. But a pub owned by a 2* chef is a destination place that is, presumably, designed to attract punters from a wider catchment area. Now I know no reservation places are becoming increasingly popular but not for the likes of me - I simply won't travel even a few miles round the M60 simply on spec. For the vast majority of places where I might eat, if they don't take a reservation, they don't get my business.

Sep 24, 2014
Harters in U.K./Ireland

What's for Dinner #327-The Scotland Votes Edition! [through September 25, 2014]

It's "almost veggie night" at Harters Hall, with this salad.

Into the serving bowl goes chopped tomatoes (we've three different types), a tin of cannellini beans, chopped avocade and a big handful of spinach. Meanwhile, red onion and chopped chorizo are getting a seeing-to in the frying pan. Once the onion has started to soften and the chorizo release its oil, some sherry vinegar goes in, along with garlic and oregano. That then gets mixed through the salad. Crusty bread as the carb.

[Alderley Edge , Cheshire] The Alderley Restaurant

I remember last time we were here, it was in the middle of winter so perhaps not a big surprise that the restaurant was on the chilly side. I didn’t expect it to be chilly in September, but it was. My partner kept her jacket on all evening – fortunately it was one of those elegant affairs that, although designed for outdoor use, still look good inside. Not so fortunate for blokes wearing anoraks.

Nothing else had changed since we were last here (apart from the hotel creating a separate brasserie which seemed quite popular with it’s business residents). There’s still good service – fairly formal but without being up their own arses. There’s a short menu that reads fairly well. And there’s still a bit of a reliance on foams and sous vide – have we not got over those fads?

The amuse was the first of the foams – celeriac, topped with parmesan crisps – and it was good, but then I’d find it difficult not to like celeriac in any presentation.

The first starter promised scallops, both roasted and raw, and they were pretty much perfect. It also promised a langoustine terrine which would have been nice but, instead, it’d become a langoustine jelly, which wasn’t . A little scattering of apple and micro leaf set off a very pretty plate. “Pork and Chorizo” sounded a butch enough offering for me. A decent slab of piggy was perfectly tender, to the point of being a bit mushy – no doubt the kitchen had been at it with the sous vide bath. I liked the chorizo “bonbon”, crisp on the outside with punchy flavours inside.

I think I copped for the sous vide again with my main course. Grouse, from Hebden Bridge, was the most obviously seasonal item on the menu, so seemed a good bet. And, yes, there was bags of flavour but, again, the overly soft texture that would have been improved by just a little time in the frying pan. There was bland vegetable that I thought was possibly kohlrabi but a check on the menu said it was smoked pumpkin. Didnt taste of smoke or pumpkin to me. But there was a slice of a very decent dauphinoise potato. The other main was a slow cooked piece of ribeye – an unusual cut for slow cooking but it did seem to work. This was almost a Sunday roast beef dinner, with gravy and veg.

The pre-dessert was a cracker, coming in two parts. First, a rhubarb ice lolly – really sharp. And, second, another foam – this time pomegranate – sweet but not overly so.

Textures of blackberry was the best sounding dessert. And it tasted good, although more of cream and general sweetness, than of the blackberry which was confined to a jelly and a scattering of fresh berries. Working well with it was a blob of ice cream and a nutmeg pannacotta. I fancied cheese more than sweet – there’s about a dozen on offer and it’s your choice of four. So, that’ll be the Shorrocks Lancashire Bomb (the finest Tasty Lancashire I know), Wigmore (a soft sheeps milk), Burt’s Blue (from just down the road in Altrincham) and an Isle of Mull Cheddar. All of them well kept and, mercifully, not fridge cold. It comes with bread, crackers and a belting chutney.

So, an enjoyable meal, although not everything was perfect. We’ll certainly keep it on our list. It’s the sort of place you might come for a minor celebration – a birthday or anniversary, although not one of the major ones.

Sep 24, 2014
Harters in U.K./Ireland

What's for Dinner #327-The Scotland Votes Edition! [through September 25, 2014]

I love tongue. It's a common sandwich meat in the UK but I think I've only eaten it hot on a couple of occasions, in restaurants - never cooked it at home.

I agree with the MiL, parsnips are always a good inclusion in things like this.

Sep 24, 2014
Harters in Home Cooking

Veal: Evolving from “Cruel Meat” to Ethical Choice - Analyst Insight from Euromonitor International

As described in the article, rose veal in the UK has been a big success. Not only does it provide us with delicious meat but it provides welcome profit for dairy farmers who, otherwise, would be slaughtering male calves at one day old, so as not to incur costs on animals not required for their industry. Raising for veal means the calves at least have some months of decent life.

By the by, I am cautious about where I'm willing to eat veal. Fine in the European Union countries where the "veal crates" have been illegal for several years. Not willing in non-EU countries in Europe, America, etc.

Sep 23, 2014
Harters in Food Media & News
1

Internet Trolls Are Narcissists, Psychopaths, and Sadists

I think my e-friend linguafood is doing her own bit of trolling here. LOL.

Sep 23, 2014
Harters in Food Media & News

Fed-up chef posts angry signs telling hard-to-please customers to stay away

The customer is not always right. Often we are just arsewipes.

Sep 23, 2014
Harters in Food Media & News

What's for Dinner #327-The Scotland Votes Edition! [through September 25, 2014]

We're going out for dinner - a posh-ish place a few miles south in Cheshire's "Golden Triangle" (they say there's more Ferraris per head of population than around Maranello).

Mrs H will be driving, as I have another 3 weeks before the doctor will let me get behind the wheel. Which means they won't be selling us any booze. I did say to herself we could get a taxi but she's opted to drive. They will be selling us some very nice food.