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awesome restaurants in nyc with food stores attached?

How about Fairway Market on the upper west side which has a steakhouse on the 2nd floor.

Mar 05, 2007
Flynn1 in Manhattan

Why is there a scarcity of female sushi chefs?

Good point yet in a small restaurant the owner probably doesn't do everything himself. Also, not every sushi chef is an owner.

At the Fulton Fish Market in New York, there is a Seafood Delivery service for retail establishments and also a Loading/Unloading service per the link below.

§1-34 Seafood Delivery Operations. A seafood deliverer shall be subject to the requirements for conducting a seafood delivery business that are contained in this section.
(a) The market manager may designate an area or areas within the market area where Seafood Deliverers shall park while picking up seafood from wholesalers for delivery.
(b) (1) Seafood deliverers shall possess a valid driver's license as required by §501 of the Vehicle and Traffic Law.
(2) All vehicles employed in a seafood delivery business shall possess: proper vehicle registration as required by §401 of the Vehicle and Traffic Law; a valid inspection sticker obtained pursuant to the provisions of Article 5 of the Vehicle and Traffic Law; and insurance coverage as required by Article 6 of the Vehicle and Traffic Law.
(3) All vehicles employed in a seafood delivery business shall display a sticker or decal issued by the market manager in a location to be designated by the market manager.
(c) A seafood deliverer shall not offer seafood for sale within the market area for resale to the public unless the seafood deliverer is also registered as a wholesaler.
(d) Seafood deliverers shall comply at all times with all applicable Federal, State and City regulations regarding the proper handling of seafood.
http://www.nyc.gov/html/bic/downloads...

Feb 28, 2007
Flynn1 in Not About Food

Why is there a scarcity of female sushi chefs?

That is so cool that your Auntie was one of the "Rosie the Riveter" workers. She must have had some great stories to share.

Feb 27, 2007
Flynn1 in Not About Food

Best (Funniest? Wittiest?) Food Quotes

"I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number you get in a diamond." Mae West

Feb 27, 2007
Flynn1 in Not About Food

Why is there a scarcity of female sushi chefs?

You are comparing apples to oranges. Why are there no American women butchers, fishermen and crane operators? I'm not sure but I would say it's easier to slice some raw fish and make it look pretty than to haul a whole side of bloody beef in a cold meat locker. I wouldn't want to be a butcher either or doing something unglamorous and back-breaking and I'm a guy.

To shed some more light on non-traditional occupations for women, let's just look at the history of Rosie the Riveter during World War II when the men were away at war. The best known slogan was "We Can Do It!" and women did: they worked in the ammunitions factory, on airplanes, you name it-they did it. Click below for more information. Who knows? Maybe one day we'll have a female president and a 'First Gentleman' in the White House.

http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/wit/rosie.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosie_th...

Feb 27, 2007
Flynn1 in Not About Food

Why is there a scarcity of female sushi chefs?

In Manhattan, there is a female-owned restaurant where the owner is also the sushi chef. The name is Taka Restaurant in the West Village on Grove Street. This got me thinking about why there's such a shortage of female sushi chefs.

I've heard that in Japan it's believed that women's hands are warmer than a man's and the salt content would affect the taste of the fish. This sounds like an old wive's tale to me because, logically, it seems to me that most men's hands sweat more than women's.

Here is a quote I read (link below) from Masa Takayama of Masa in the Time-Warner Building:

"Asked about the virtual nonexistence of women sushi chefs, Masa said, "Everything having to do with fish is man's work: catching, cutting, cooking, making sushi. It is very hard work, and women do not have the stamina to stand behind the sushi counter." All the sushi chefs I spoke with, and even Kazuko, one of the most self-reliant women I know, agreed. It reminded me of the old canard that women couldn't be chefs because they are incapable of lifting 15-gallon stockpots."

Do sushi chefs in the U.S. all 'catch' their own fish? It just seems a bit farfetched. So does anyone else have any ideas why there's a shortage of female sushi chefs. Personally, I wouldn't mind sitting at a sushi counter and talking/flirting with a female chef!

www.mikunisushi.com/?mvcTask=corporat...

Feb 26, 2007
Flynn1 in Not About Food

Is Tavern on the Green Really That Bad?

I'm a native New Yorker from Hell's Kitchen and really frown upon touristy places but, contrary to what other Chowhounds feel about Tavern on the Green, I think the space is kind of magical. This is especially true from Spring through the cooler months when the garden is open. Tavern is a landmark that opened in the 1930s and is smack in the middle of Central Park with a terrific view and lots of shimmering lights when evening falls. It's kind of charming to see the horsedrawn carriages pull up to the door and drop off or wait for customers.

The indoor Crystal Room is also very pretty. This is not to say that I recommend the food as a destination - but it's better than wedding or Bar Mitzvah food - and I never had a problem with the service or really had awful food. Plus it sounds like your Mom has her heart set on visiting the restaurant.

My suggestion is to go with the simpler dishes and they also have a prix fixe menu to keep the costs down. I really didn't find them much higher than other celebratory restaurants.

The last time I was there in the warm months, they also had a live band in the garden and people were having a good time dancing to various music. It wasn't stuffy either.

Here's a website to describe them a bit more as a landmark. Right below is a link directly to the restaurant itself.

http://www.expedia.com/pub/agent.dll?...&

http://67.59.176.121/tg1003/newsite/i...

Feb 26, 2007
Flynn1 in Manhattan

Ethnic Dining

jhleung - I would imagine that in many parts of the U.S., many people still consider Italian food to be 'ethnic' - especially when being introduced to different Italian regions other than Southern Italian which is what many people had become used to.

You say "Chinese food in the States is more "ethnic" than Italian food."
I don't believe it's fair to compare Italian vs. Chinese as one group being considered more ethnic than the other. Yes, the Chinese arrived early in the 19th Century but from 1882 to 1943 they were not allowed to become naturalized citizens, marry or have their family come over per the Chinese Exclusion Act. This was a long period of discrimination in the States against a group.

Here are a couple of websites that expand on the history of the Chinese Exclusion Act. I don't mean for this to become political but more knowledge of this exclusion might better enhance the history of this period.

http://www.answers.com/topic/magnuson...

http://www.asian-nation.org/first.shtml

Feb 26, 2007
Flynn1 in General Topics

Ethnic Dining

Bravo! Excellent points you raised.

Feb 23, 2007
Flynn1 in General Topics

Theater District this evening

When I'm in the theater district I go to the very reasonably-priced Edison Cafe (lovingly known as the Polish Tearoom") 228 W. 47 Street bet. Broadway & 8th Ave (212-840-5001) They have some excellent homemade soups and serve everything from burgers, salads, blintzes and full meals. I've seen large groups there where they can move tables around to fit the group.

The space is like a time capsule from the 50s (luncheonnette style) but lots of choices are Eastern European. Posters from various plays-past and present-hang on the walls which always puts me in the mood for the theater.

Feb 22, 2007
Flynn1 in Manhattan

Ethnic Dining

Interesting responses. I do take issue with the comments that the word 'ethnic' is used to denote non-white, different or cheaper food. Personally, in my circle in NYC, I've never heard the term ethnic restaurants used but I'm sure it's probably a common term just to describe food that's not inherently "Americanized” like hot dogs and burgers.

Look, we’re a nation of immigrants, a melting pot, and each group brought their own customs and foods. It could be argued that hot dogs and burgers originated from Germany. Yes, but the Germans immigrated to the United States as early as the 1680s and during the 18th Century Germans were the largest group to immigrate. So of course we’re more familiar with food like sausages and hamburgers. The Italians, also immigrated to the U.S. in large numbers in the early 1900s. Here again, we’re comfortable with Italian-American cuisine and it’s probably the most popular food in America. As air travel (and the World Wars) became more prevalent, U.S. citizens visited different countries and regions and became more knowledgeable with the cuisine.

Recent influxes of different groups of immigrants may not be “Americanized” yet insofar as their customs. This is where I believe the ‘ethnic cuisine’ term is used. Is it a slur? I don’t think so. Could we come up with a better word than ethnic? When did ethnic become a dirty word?

Feb 21, 2007
Flynn1 in General Topics

Meatpacking -- any good chow?

Don't know if it's fancy enough for your friends but Florent, 69 Gansevoort St, between Washington Street and Greenwich Street (212) 989-5779 is a pioneer in the MPD. They were there ages before the area got hot and trendy. Its atmosphere is like an older diner but the food is solid French bistro and standard American food-good salads, burgers, etc. Depending what time you go, you'll encounter different types of crowds since I recall it's open 24 hours.

Pastis has settled into its location and is not as sceney as it used to be - again depending what time you go.

Though I haven't gone personally, I've heard that Nicole's 202 in the Chelsea Food Market (around 15th Street & Ninth Avenue) a stone's throw from the MPD, is pretty good.

Feb 20, 2007
Flynn1 in Manhattan

East Village Indian Myth?

Not exactly true about curry not being Indian but British. See Wikipedia for more details. I'm kind of surprised that Suvir Saran made such a broad statement.

The concept of curry was brought to the West by British colonialists in India from the 18th century.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curry

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curry#Br...

Feb 20, 2007
Flynn1 in Manhattan

Ethnic Dining

I have no problem with the term 'ethnic' when describing certain restaurants - I believe it's just used as shorthand for 'ethnic cuisine' and not a label to describe cheap food or lower-ranking restaurants. I don't think it's pejorative or a slur on certain countries. In general, I dislike labels and I find non-descript labels such as Mediterrean food or global and fusion are sillier.

I find this to be a very interesting topic and did a little Google search on what 'ethnic' is.
Listed below are some websites that define ethnic groups

From my own perception, if I go to a Russian, Albanian, or Hungarian restaurant, where the food served reflects the country's cuisine and the owners and staff are from that particular country with that country's particular culture, then it's ethnic. I don't consider Chinese-American food to be ethnic because the recipes were altered for American tastes at that time. However, if I go to a Fukinese restaurant where the chef, owner and staff are from that region and cooking Fukinese dishes, I consider it ethnic cuisine.

Dictionary definition: being a member of a particular ethnic group, especially belonging to a national group by heritage or culture but residing outside its national boundaries: ethnic Hungarians living in northern Serbia.

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/ethnic

http://coe.sdsu.edu/people/jmora/Cult...
The term ethnic means of or pertaining to a group of people recognized as a class on the basis of certain distinctive characteristics such as religion, language, ancestry, culture or national origin.

http://www.sallys-place.com/food/ethn...

Feb 20, 2007
Flynn1 in General Topics

What Etiquette Do You Expect of Your HOST?

Have you ever talked to your mother-in-law directly? Could you and she make some kind of compromise that you won't always do the same chores? Maybe you could set the table, the other daughter-in-law lay out the food. Spread the work out. Better yet, buy her a dishwasher!

Feb 20, 2007
Flynn1 in Not About Food

Gift Card Etiquette

Whenever I'm in doubt about a restaurant's 'policy' I call them directly and just ask. You could do it anonymously and then make your reservation later.

If it's a gift card, like a gift certificate, I don't see why it should make a difference. They've already been paid in advance.

Feb 20, 2007
Flynn1 in Not About Food

The Red Cat and Varietal: Brief Reviews

Coincidentally, Moira Hodgson of the New York Observer also visited Varietal and wrote about it this week. Her take on the restaurant praises many dishes. Maybe 12 weeks is too soon to raise a death knell on a new restaurant and stating that a space is empty at midnight on a Thursday night is premature. After all, it's not a disco in the Chelsea area.

Click here for the review:
http://www.nyobserver.com/20070219/20...

Feb 16, 2007
Flynn1 in Manhattan

Dinner near 37th and lex

Docks Oyster Bar and Seafood Grill at 40th Street & 3rd Avenue (212 986-8080 would be my choice if you like oysters and shellfish. It's like a seafood brasserie and if you're really jetlagged and want quiet, reserve a table in the back.

There's a decent (not great) French restaurant, which name escapes me, on 37th or 38th Street & Madison Avenue. They serve breakfast, lunch & dinner as well as take-out French pastries. It's directly across the street from the Moonstruck Diner.

As far as street pushcart pretzels go, all the hot dog carts seem to get their pretzels from the same source. Try to go to a busy cart where the pretzels are fresher and make sure it's warmed up. Various flavors of pretzels (the softer kind) are also sold in Penn Station if you somehow wind up there - but don't go out of your way.

Feb 16, 2007
Flynn1 in Manhattan

Is there a term for a cheese expert?

You're right! I hadn't read all the posts.

Okay, how about The Big Cheese?

Feb 16, 2007
Flynn1 in Cheese

Is 13 an unlucky number for a reservation? help!!

Make a reservation for 14 or 12 and then fib about one person showing up/cancelling at the last minute.

There's an old old superstition about 13 people at a table so that's why I'm suggesting you add or subtract one number from your reservation. Hey, maybe it's possible one more person will show up! :)

Feb 15, 2007
Flynn1 in Manhattan

Is there a term for a cheese expert?

Cheese Whiz!

Feb 14, 2007
Flynn1 in Cheese

The Chowhound Police

I really disagree that Chowhound's mission is "to share tips on finding great chow." Too many controversial topics have been left on the Boards by the moderators while some seemingly innocuous ones are eliminated. For example, the thread on "Eating cats, dogs and horses" is, in my opionion, not about finding 'great chow' yet it stays up and people are writing in about it pro and con. Actually, I don't believe it's legal to serve cats and dogs in the USA. Some restaurants have been closed because it was found they were serving these animals. I know that the US exports horsemeat to Europe but I'm not sure it's legal in the States.
Here's the thread:
http://www.chowhound.com/topics/364398

My point is that food in itself can be political and while I'm glad we don't have screaming matches on these boards, the balance of what's allowed, what's okay and what's deleted is sometimes a gray area.

I know the Moderators are a great bunch and are volunteers but a bit more consistency would be appreciated.

Feb 13, 2007
Flynn1 in Site Talk

Recommendations for best Panini press/grill sandwich maker

Help - I want to buy a panini maker to grill my own delicious sandwiches. Too many choices when I did a search on Google. I'll pay up to about $100 (doesn't have to be cafe quality) but best features and results are my priority.

All Chowhound recommendations are appreciated.

Feb 13, 2007
Flynn1 in Cookware

Best Won Ton Soup (no pork)

Fusia on East 56th Street between Lexington and Third Avenue has a delicious shrimp wonton soup - small or large bowl - and the shrimps are a good size.

Feb 09, 2007
Flynn1 in Manhattan

How to split the wine $, dining out w a group?

This is one of those situations that depend on the group and how close you are to the people you're dining with. If an individual is not a wine drinker and gets burnt lots of times because they just have 'regular' food and not the most expensive appetizer, entree and dessert on the menu, then I would ask the waiter beforehand for a separate check for the wine and alcohol. However, if an individual even has one glass of wine from the bottle then I believe they should split the cost of that bottle.

Splitting the check at the end of the meal can be uncomfortable with a group unless everybody has agreed to split the check evenly. However, for the non-drinker this is not usually an even exchange. If it happens too often, speak up and ask that waiter for a separate tally.

Feb 09, 2007
Flynn1 in Not About Food

Dinner with Vegetarian

For vegetarians/vegans, one has to be careful when dining in non-vegetarian restaurants. For example, the vegetables might be sauted in butter which vegans don't eat. A vegetable loaf might have chicken broth or eggs added for flavoring. It's usually no good to ask wait staff the 'incidental' ingredients as they're not sure and usually don't want to trek over and ask the chef.

For casual vegetarians, I suppose Wilfrid's suggestions are fine. Just my two cents about added ingredients.

Feb 08, 2007
Flynn1 in Manhattan

Dinner with Vegetarian

I second Blossom for vegetarian. Everything I tried was delicious and ran about $30 per person with tip, although we didn't have wine or alcohol.

What I liked was the warm atmosphere of the room because so many veg. restaurants still seem like they're in a 60s time warp - ditto the wait staff. I wish more vegie/vegan restaurants would add a bit more ambiance to their dining rooms.

Feb 08, 2007
Flynn1 in Manhattan

Cozy french restuarant

La Luncheonette on 10th Avenue & 18th Street (212) 675-0342 has delicious French food and would be my choice. The small front room is cozy and so is the slightly larger back room.

Feb 06, 2007
Flynn1 in Manhattan

Pizza 33

"It really boggles my mind how particular people are about burgers and pizza on this board"

Well, burgers and pizza are so universally well-loved and that's why we're called Chowhounds. We don't like to eat medicore, unsatisfying food and there's just too much of that with burgers & pizza.

IMO, Pizza 33 is totally bad - if you can get a slice of Margherita if it's just out of the oven, that's passable. I don't 'get' their pizza with macaroni on top at all. It looks gluey and leaden and it's a double disappointment - bad pasta on top of bad pizza.

Feb 06, 2007
Flynn1 in Manhattan

Moving to NY. Suggestions on where to reside based on chow?

Tastyjon, you are a true Chowhound - to want to move to a neighborhood, based on food amd restaurant choices, is impressive.

If I could afford to, my first choice would be the West Village. There are so many good restaurants in this fun neighborhood plus Mom and Pop food shops on Bleecker Street (Faiccos, Murray's Cheese, Ottomanelli and Florence butchers plus Gourmet Garage). Plus the WV is close to other neighborhoods like the East Village which was also recommended here.

My second choice & third choices would be the Lower East Side and the East Village. Here you'll get the trendy restaurants plus a wonderful assortment of 'ethnic' restaurants. The Lower East Side is close to Chinatown.

My fourth choice is the Flatiron district which is close to the Union Square farmers market. The choice of fresh vegies and fruit is amazing depending on the season.

Keep in mind that Manhattan is a walker's city so if you're in one of the above listed hoods, you are never that far from good eats.

Feb 05, 2007
Flynn1 in Manhattan