randallhank's Profile

Title Last Reply

New All-Clad Handles... About Time.

BTW, the handles are still pretty lousy. Too rounded on the top edge.

Aug 17, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

New All-Clad Handles... About Time.

I guess my suggestion about making multiple pans the same diameter is what most companies do to streamline the lid situation. But that would ruin the nesting capabilities of this set. Still, I think this was a terrible compromise. In restaurant style cooking you can skip the lid for many things because the cooktops are so powerful and no one seems to care about wasting energy. Maybe they are counting on anyone who can afford this set having a high BTU cooktop, but I think home cooks need lids.

Aug 17, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

Help me build a great cookware set!

I'm going to walk back my comments about three dimensional cooking just a bit. A thicker clad product will allow a stew or pot roast to cook more evenly on the stovetop, and likewise a braised dish in the oven seems to benefit from a thick "second oven." Basically we are talking about reduced conductivity mitigating an imperfect heat source, and retaining moisture properly. Not sure you'll agree with that, but my experience has been that less conductive materials often do better in the oven. It's why people bake with stoneware and glass.

Aug 17, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

New All-Clad Handles... About Time.

Maybe, maybe not. I think the whole point of this set is that it has everything you need. After seeing this set in person I can tell you that the best thing about it is that the pan sizes and dimensions relative to those sizes are done from a professional perspective.

I'll second the Demeyere rec if you have the cheese. If not, and induction isn't part of the equation, try Sitram Catering. More often than not, I reach for those for everyday cooking.

Aug 16, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

New All-Clad Handles... About Time.

The lids are a disaster in a number of ways. You would have to find some real lids for at least a few of the pans. The braiser is one of the nicest pans in the set and you certainly aren't going to use the universal lid in the oven! Why not just make the stocker, braised and sauté all with the same diameter? The sauté, btw is also really nice -- 5 quarts with great dimensions, somewhere in between a regular low-sided sauté and a deep sauté. rolled rims, brushed exterior, I'd cook with it. But I don't need to.

Aug 16, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

New All-Clad Handles... About Time.

LOL. I saw this line on Friday and I had the exact same experience with the lids. Part of the issue is also that WS is so eager to show the nesting capabilities that they tried to display everything on one tiny hightop. I think having universal lids for a set this nice is a mistake. How about simply have more pans with similar diameter?

Aug 16, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

Help me build a great cookware set!

I think you hit the nail on the head as far as All-Clad. It is self intuitive that a thicker pan will make for less responsiveness. Making the cladding thicker does seem to blunt hotspots, at leasts in the tests I've seen. A highly conductive metal like copper seems to mitigate the need for more mass, and at the same time allows for better downward response. Obviously Demeyere thought thickness was an advantage because they made their Proline frypans with a ton of aluminum. Both objective testing and personal experience says that copper will result in a more even result even in a clad setting, especially if either the copper is > 2mm or the overall thickness is over 4mm. So, there are a number of ways to achieve even heating. The issue with D5 (or AC copper core, for that matter), is that it is none of the above. So, D23 might be the ticket, but I don't see the point in the alternating of materials, except that All-Clad thought they could replicate the Proline experience while keeping the weight down. I'm not a fan. D5 seems to take the maximum amount of energy and achieve only middling result.

I made the same observations as you did about boiling tests, but using a wider pan on a wider burner obviously makes a difference. The only point I'll quibble with involves cooking in three dimensions. Very few applications require 3 dimensions, especially if you have a pan and or stove that can maintain a very low simmer. There are a handful of applications that would benefit, but my Demeyere pans can hold a Hollandaise just fine. You just have to know your cooktop and your cookware. I would love to have a copper saucepan and/or sauté, but I pretty much never saw those things in the professional kitchens I worked in, including some 4 and 5 diamond rated places. If you dabble in chocolate and candy maybe you need a full compliment of 3 dimensional cooking vessels, but most highly skilled cooks probably would consider more than one or two pure indulgence. But, hey, indulge away.

I enjoy the challenge of my electric coil, and mastering the skill of using every drop of energy while producing perfect results. As you know, this endeavor has involved a revamp of my cookware, but I actually think I am cooking better than ever. I do think you need cookware that sits dead flat to really make it work, otherwise you need to keep the heat level higher than it should be to account for inefficiency, and this can create hotspots and really affects control. My current cookware allows me to keep the heat source lower for every application, so I reduce the need for downward response. And it's a lot easier to go from 5 down to 3 than it is to go from 7 down to 5 -- there is just too much energy built up at that point. Downward response on electric is much easier when you are dabbling at the low end of the stove's power output. And, like you say, you can always pull the pan off the burner. I have looked into getting a better electric, but there isn't much out there. The options I have aren't worth my time, so I just focus on vessel efficiency. It's the poor man's kitchen remodel!

Thanks for the tip on the copper plate. I am interested to check it out.

Aloha,

Randy

Aug 16, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

Help me build a great cookware set!

LOL. The rivets themselves take up very little volume. That's not what I meant. The tendency, at least for me, is in doing sauce work, making rice, or thicker soups is to choose a pan that is slightly bigger in hopes of cooking only below the rivets. On the other hand I have a 1.1 quart Demeyere that I don't hesitate to use. If I had that size in an All-Clad I would never use it because I would be working around the rivets, worried about food sticking, etc. I would probably grab the 1.5 quart in the All-Clad. Likewise I can make what seems like a ton of rice in the 2.3 quart Demeyere, whereas I would almost certainly grab a 3 quart All-Clad for the same job. The rivets are more of an annoyance than anything else.

Aug 16, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

Help me build a great cookware set!

To just follow up and clarify. The tests I did were on a standard radiant ring electric coil.

I did follow up with the 9.5 inch soup pot on the larger, more powerful burner. It boiled the water in less than 10 minutes. Then I retested the All-Clad stainless sauce pot on the same burner. It took about 13.5 minutes to reach a rapid boil. So the full cladding is clearly not helping much in transferring heat from the source into the sides and into the water. If you look at the even heating rankings I posted earlier in this thread for saute pans, you'll see that the aluminum full clad pans have a pretty remarkable heat differential at 10cm, around 80 degrees or more. The responsiveness is always going to be an issue compared to thickness, but full cladding doesn't improve responsiveness. The only thing that seems to improve responsiveness is using a more conductive material, and even that difference in conductivity is fairly limited in a clad pan of any type. As Kaleo says, the cladding ultimately blunts the responsiveness, sometimes in a good way (even heating), and sometimes bad (temperature control). But the various tests out there seem to indicate that cladding alone is not enough to create an even heating surface. The real question for me, though, is whether having a copper clad base can improve the tradeoff between evenness and responsiveness that appears to be unavoidable in a stainless/aluminum clad situation. I think the evidence suggests that it does. For me, being stuck in a situation with below average heat control, this difference matters. If I had a gazzilion watt gas range that could also hold a perfect simmer, I think the differences would be negligible, or at least overlooked.

Aug 07, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

Help me build a great cookware set!

OK. I finally tested the 2 quart All-Clad stainless sauce pan relative to the Sitram Catering (copper clad base), and Letang and Remy (thinner copper clad base). The overall results were that they all went from cool tapwater on a cold small (6 inch) burner on high heat in between 13 and 14.5 minutes. In other words, there wasn't much difference. If you must know, the Sitram was quickest and the Letand et Remy came in second, and the All-Clad slowest. But the difference wasn't significant. So long as the material is fairly conductive, what we are really measuring is the speed at which the water is transferring the heat.

Clearly the fully clad aspect isn't create much of an advantage, and if it is, it is being overcome by having copper in the base. Assuming the copper offers a bit more control, I see no benefit to a fully clad vessel for cooking with water, or even for sauce work for that matter. Once you get past this aspect, you are back at the even heat rankings for sear and saute. I think the thick base pans consistently outperform everything but solid copper, unless you are getting something as thick as the Proline. Even the Proline is outperformed in even heating by the Atlantis saute, though I like the super hot sidewalls for searing larger cuts and a package of chicken breasts all at once.

My next test will be boiling 2 quarts of water in my 6 quart Letang and Remy wide stockpot on the 8 inch burner. The larger burner does have a greater output, but my overall hypothesis is that the wide base of the pan, and a matching heat source will show a more pronounced advantage than the variant compositional makeup of the 2 quart pans. I would even bet that the larger burner and wider pan will best the two quart pans on medium heat.

Aug 06, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

New All-Clad Handles... About Time.

"However, optimum performance for any individual user is almost impossible to determine, or even adequately measure without both honing in on the energy source, and the types of cooking anticipated."

THIS

Aug 06, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

New All-Clad Handles... About Time.

Obviously I meant "big box store," not "box-top."

Jul 31, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

New All-Clad Handles... About Time.

I hear you on the celeb endorsed cookware. It sort of cheapens it. It's like wearing a "pro" glove with a player's signature on the inside. You know the real mlb guys might use very similar, if not the same, glove, but they don't have Roger Clemens' fake signature on the inside.

I relegated my truly awesome Michael Chiarello Signature cookware to the bench in favor of Demeyere, largely because I wanted a larger saute (and a few other shapes), but also perhaps because a part of me cringes every time I grab those handles with Chiarello's name on it. The quality is unquestioned but as someone who has spent significant time in the industry, I just felt like a complete poser every time I picked the stuff up.

Jul 30, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

New All-Clad Handles... About Time.

Yes, SLT exclusive. The handles are nice -- like them better than my Atlantis handles (which I love aesthetically, but don't love the angle).

Jul 30, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

New All-Clad Handles... About Time.

Spot-on analysis here. I would even add that there is more availability of upscale cookware with outfits like BBB selling Demeyere and Sitram online, etc. There are perhaps fewer companies making truly great cookware, but a handfull of upscale brands available at bourgeois box-top stores has to hurt. Also, the proliferation of information changes the game significantly.

Jul 30, 2014
randallhank in Cookware
1

New All-Clad Handles... About Time.

And they are practically giving them away! At $1,400 they leave you plenty of money left over to by the missing saute and a stocker.

Jul 30, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

New All-Clad Handles... About Time.

I imagine that the one guy is Belgian and the other from the (evil) Zwilling Group in Germany. Don't ask me which one is which. There are also several dialects within Belgium, so that could account for the variant pronunciation.

Jul 30, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

New All-Clad Handles... About Time.

I'm with you. Day late and a dollar short.

Jul 30, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

triplinox cookware

I know this is late, but after getting a few of these on ebay and trying them out, I wanted to give a review of sorts for those looking at this stuff in the future. First off, Indigo, you got a steal on some quality cookware. No, it's not Demeyere or Sitram Catering, but for most home cooks and 80% of applications this stuff will do a bang up job.

The cookware is sturdy, yet relatively lightweight, and the steel is clearly of high quality and cleans up easily. The copper base is 1mm thick, thicker than the copper inside All-clad copper core. The pans respond quickly to temperature changes and heat evenly. The pans, which must be 20-30 years old at this point, sit dead flat on my crappy electric stove, which is really important -- not even a hint of warping, and I have already used them at some pretty high temperatures.

The handles at first feel inadequate, but non of the metal was compromised on the set I bought, and they seem sturdy enough for as often as you might use them. There is a real advantage to having handles that come off when you want to keep things hot in an oven or on a plata. The setup I got has just a single handle which I interchange between a few pots as needed, and this seems ideal since I won't be using the handles all the time anyway. The one piece construction of the pans has built in handles on the sides of the casseroles so they are easy to move around with pot holders or a dish towel.

The lids are all of standard sizes, so if you are missing a lid or get a dent, they are easy to replace. The pans also nest inside one another which is nice. Provided they aren't abused, they should last decades. If you are looking for a low cost alternative to some of the more expensive copper clad stuff (of which there is shockingly little these days), you could do a lot worse. If you can find them for around $20 per pan (or less) you really can't do better for the price.

Jul 30, 2014
randallhank in Cookware
1

Help me build a great cookware set!

I generally agree on the cladding. You've probably seen this, but the second paragraph speaks to my opinion.

http://www.centurylife.org/2013/10/26...

I have a pretty average to crappy HOB so I chose solution #2, but I also got rid of the 13" skillet and a few other shapes that I thought were just not efficient on my stovetop.

The greater the mismatch between the size of the burner and the pan will likely accentuate both the strengths and weaknesses of the cookware material, AND the strengths and weaknesses of the burner. So, I would say that the advantages of copper are greatest on a weak/small burner with a large piece of cookware. This would also, I would think, indicate that the advantages are at least proportionately less on a good range with a medium size pan (assuming the other pan in question is at least of decent quality).

Jul 29, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

Help me build a great cookware set!

I will see what I can do. I tested the 2 quart Letang et Remy casserole versus a two quart Sitram Catering casserole. I filled both with just over 2 quarts of liquid and boiled on the same burner from completely cold (I did one last night and one tonight) on the highest setting with no lid on until they came to rolling boil. The Sitram won but only by about a minute. One observation I had is that they both looked the same as they water first started to boil, but the Sitram went from a few bubbles on the surface to a full rolling boil about twice as fast. My sense is that the Sitram can hold more heat and would be able to maintain a full boil, or a low simmer, on a lower heat setting once the contents reach the desired temperature. This is no small thing. It makes sense since the Sitram Catering has at least twice as much copper in the base as the Letang et Remy Triplinox. The main differences are on the margins of cooking technique, not in hardboiling eggs though. I won't know more about the Tripinox until I try cooking some onions or making a one pot soup.

Both of those pans are both copper clad though. I do happen to have the All-Clad 2 quart sauce pan, so I could do the test with that. I try to use the same size pans so I don't have to account for heating a lot of extraneous material. Somewhere online (maybe here?) I read of someone comparing the Sitram Catering to the Profisserie line and determining that performance was more or less the same. I would guess Sitram accounts for that in their engineering since they are largely used in commercial settings. They want to achieve a similar (ideal) response by including a thickness of aluminum that will maximize response with weight.

In fully clad, I own the aforementioned All-Clad, an All-Clad copper-core sauce pan (I have owned other pieces of both at one point or another), and a Spring Brigade Premium multi-ply saute pan. The Spring is the best cookware of that bunch IMHO, but it is hard to get your hands on. I also have some Calphalon One pieces which, in the 2-4 quart sizes, heat remarkably evenly and have better response than the stainless clad with aluminum. The larger pieces didn't seem to do as well because with the extra metal they required higher heat settings, and were not well-matched to the size of the burners. This is why I went down the copper clad road to begin with.

My hypothesis was that 2mm copper clad with stainless base would provide the most even heating saute surface (sorry, Kaleo, I can't afford 3+mm of solid copper), and give me a sufficient amount of responsiveness. So far that has proven to be exactly correct. The exception is the Proline skillet, which seems to heat just as evenly as the Atlantis saute (3.7mm of aluminum will do that). But, it is less responsive than the saute pan, so I use it for searing steaks, but not for other cooking techniques.

http://www.centurylife.org/2013/10/23...

Full discloser here: I also own the Michael Chiarello saute (Stanley Cheng clearly gave Chiarello the "Napa Buddies hookup" in creating this line) that places 3rd on this list and 1st on the gas rankings, ahead of both the Atlantis and Proline. I found most of the set on clearance at TJ Maxx before I knew anything about them. The saute is a tank, and it does cook very, very evenly. I am not sure how much copper is in there, but upward responsive is fast and even. Doward? Not so much, but the base is so thick that you'd really have to mess up to ruin any food, and there are no hotspots to worry about. I compared boiling water time in a 2quart saucepan with my Demeyere and they came out in a dead heat.

So, the end result of all of this is that the Demeyere, Sitram Catering, and Chiarello Signature Clad (Meyer) all heat really evenly at medium to high temperature settings. If I had to pick one set to use all the time (and apparently I don't!) it would be the Sitram though, because it has noticeably quicker downward response, and is less bulky. These two are related!

I'll get back to you about the All-clad stainless.

Jul 29, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

Help me build a great cookware set!

I would think that some of the necessity of thickness regarding copper is mitigated by stainless cladding, at least as far as even heating goes. The need for extra thickness is to compensate for the extremely efficient heat transfer, especially since the heat source is usually smaller than the base of the pan. Likewise, a thicker piece of copper will be able to resist temperature drop. But when surrounded by stainless, I would think 2mm (or perhaps even 1mm) of copper would be quite effective since the steel would help retain heat and promote the spread of heat.

Along the same lines, for cooking with liquid (aside from sauce work), I don't know what advantage there would be to a thicker layer of copper, assuming the base of the pan was more or less the size of the burner.

I'll be able to test this hypothesis on a newly acquired pan by Letang et Remy. The copper layer on the bottom appears to be about half as thick as my Sitram, or roughly 1mm. For boiling a pot of water I don't expect to see a difference. I do however think the difference in a sauté would be significant.

I am no scientist, so correct me if I am thinking about this wrong.

Jul 28, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

Help me build a great cookware set!

Really? You think the linens, sheets and towels people register for are still in use decades later? My wife and I had a queen size bed when we got married, now we have a king. We do still have the sheets (and ironically they are probably in better shape because we rarely use them), but we never sleep on them. On the other hand we've only been married six years and our regular towels are starting to fade. We lived in the suburbs back then, later moved to New York City and had to downsize. Now we are back in the suburbs. Our needs have changed along the way. Aside from the china, glassware and silver I say anything is fair game for a return.

Jul 27, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

Help me build a great cookware set!

Yes, it sort of is. This is not like a birthday gift, or something you bring home from a foreign country for a friend, or a gift you get a lover to show him/her how much you love them. A wedding gift is basically meant as a transfer of resources to the new couple. While it is considered bad form, by some, to give cash, the function of a wedding gift bought off a registry is to buy something that the couple needs for the new home they are creating together. Once the gift is given, IMHO, the giver should not care what eventually becomes of it. Now, if you aren't using the registry and want to buy something unique that's a different story. But most people find that to be in poor form as well if a registry exists. The couple's memory is usually of the original gift given, and as far as thought goes, that's the thought the couple has, even if the object in their home ends up being something different. People register for all sorts of things, many of which eventually break, are replaced or disappear for one reason or another. If, for instance, someone registers for a vacuum cleaner and I buy it for them, I hope the marriage lasts longer than the vacuum. If at any point they find one they think will last longer, I hope they get it! I suppose your issue is with intent, but once one considers the function of a wedding gift, only the intent of the giver is relevant.

Jul 27, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

Help me build a great cookware set!

The registry is all about the "where" not the "what." Find a place that sells the things you would most want to have, either in store or online. Register for items at price points you think people will be happy to spend on you. Then exchange it for the even nicer stuff that you really want. Nobody cares. They want you to have what you want. In the end, don't be afraid to end up with fewer items of higher quality, and then add pieces one at a time over the years.

Help me build a great cookware set!

Register for a bunch of All-Clad Stainless at Bed Bath, then exchange it all in a store and have an associate order you several pieces of Demeyere online with the store credit. They will usually arrange for free shipping. You must have the sales clerk in the store order it for you online. They are more than happy to do it. They also sell Sitram online (but not in stores), if that's your jawn.

Get a Proline skillet and a 4.2 quart saute. The 11" Proline, btw, is a very good deal at Bed Bath. If you want a smaller everyday skillet, get the 9.5" Demeyere Industry from Sur La Table which is on sale for $80. You probably don't need all that metal in a smaller skillet, so the slightly thinner Industry works great. Or you could go copper, but based on your choices thus far, I'm thinking that isn't in the cards.

Jul 24, 2014
randallhank in Cookware
1

Help me build a great cookware set!

Hi DuffyH,

I am also a small Le Creuset Dutch oven user. I have both the 3.5 oval and a 3.5 shallow "wide" round one. The oval I use primarily for roasted chicken when I need to make more than one. I usually use a Nesco roaster for chicken because it roasts an entire chicken perfectly in like 35 minutes and doesn't heat up the whole house. So when I need two, I transfer the first one to the DO and put it in a warm oven. It keeps it perfectly while the second one is cooking. I suppose I could use one of my roasters and just cook the two together in the oven, but I think they come out better this way, especially if I pull the first one off at the right moment and let it coast to a finish while the second one cooks. I use both dutch ovens for small batches of soup and for rice and grains. I use the wide one as a braiser, or as a saucepan.

The main thing I find these pans useful for is when I want a cooking vessel that will keep food warm when I want to clear off the range to make room for other projects. The heat retention is the main property here, and I cannot tell you how often it comes in handy when I want to do a quick sauté or a sauce and need a spare burner. That cast iron will keep my grains warm and most for at least an hour, if not two. Likewise for brisket or braised ribs, where there is no risk of overcooking. Needless to say, you have to think about the items and order of cooking a bit in advance.

The small DO's are also good for table service. I have a 2.75 quart Staub that I use in the same way.

Jul 24, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

Help me build a great cookware set!

I'll weight in on two counts:

First, I have been down the road with the all-purpose style pans, especially when I had much less space. I still appreciate an economy of means when it comes to space, but the 3-4 quart essential pan or saucier is vastly inferior IMHO to having 3 sauce pans. If you are ever cooking a meal for more than two people, you will want a set of cookware that will allow you to take full advantage of your range. I have 1.1qt, and 2.3 qt saucepans, and a 4 quart casserole for these purposes, plus one straight sided sauté, and and 11 inch skillet. You can get away with just a sauté and forgo the skillet, but 2-3 sauce pans, a stockpot and a sauté are all essential for cooking for a small group. My primary cookware is Demeyere which has no rivets and therefore allows me to take full advantage of the volume of the saucepans. You may want to get slightly larger small pots if you intend on purchasing a brand with rivets. My point here, though, is that once you have the requisite number of saucepans a stockpot and one or two frypans you won't have much need for an expensive do-it-all pan. Better at this point to spend your money on true specialty items.

The second thing I'll share with you is in line with what some other, more respected, members around here will say. I've owned quite a few pieces of All-clad over the years (and still have a few). I have owned lots of Calphalon (and still have a few). My overall perspective on these companies has changed over the years, both based on my cooking experience and on my perception of the quality of the cookware. I can't really say a bad word about All-Clad, but I think you can do better than the stainless line for a bit less money (Sitram). And I think you can do better than the Copper Core for just a bit more money (Demeyere). I am a bit biased because I like flared rims and prefer the welded handles of quality cookware. I also think that those two brands I mentioned have better steel (though I have no empirical evidence for why this would be true, just my experience cooking on them).

Calphalon once made (and still occasionally does) great home cookware. You can still cook a fine meal in Calphalon pans, but a slight downtick in quality combined with other quality options out there puts me in the camp of people who wouldn't go out of my way to purchase them if I had do do it over again.

I still think that for the money, Sitram Catering is the best deal out there if you don't use induction and don't mind the industrial handles. Demeyere is tops for anything besides pure copper (though I think their conical sauce pans are not worth the money). And you can't go wrong with one or two dutch ovens from Le Creuset.

Jul 24, 2014
randallhank in Cookware

Which Varieties Make the Best Apple Butter?

I have always liked Smucker's -- one of their original products I believe. I see some mixed reviews on the net, but the sample size is pretty small. The complaint seems to be that it's watery and perhaps not sweet enough, but this to me tastes like the apple butter I grew up with. More acidic, a bit less "buttery" and sugary sweet, but more apple taste. I have also had Medford Farms which is very good. There may be other good boutique brands out there, but probably harder to get in your local grocery store.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/357917

Jul 22, 2014
randallhank in Home Cooking

Eggs + Induction Fob = Which Frying Pan?

Hi Kaleo:

Yes, I re-read the original query and it appears OP wants either non-stick or carbon steel. However, I am able to cook eggs over easy (or sometimes basted) on my Catering line pans with just a few drops of oil without anything sticking at all. I am not sure to what extent this is a function of the quality of steel, but I thought perhaps OP would have better luck than with his Pro-Clad. I should mention that I am doing this with a truly crappy radiant ring cooktop, and that the Sitram saved my life because of the combination of copper responsiveness and the ability to sit so flat on the cooktop. Granted this is partially a function of weight and balance (two VERY important factors with electric), but I have read nice things about the Profisserie line as well and assumed these results could be duplicated to some extent on induction (specifically the non-stick part). I can't say for sure how flat the Profisserie bottom is though, and I also suspect that the copper responsiveness can't really be fully replicated once the pan gets hot on an induction burner.

I have been wanting to try induction myself, but I am not sure there is a reasonably priced portable unit that's worth it. I am certainly open to suggestions if you feel otherwise.

Jun 24, 2014
randallhank in Cookware