randallhank's Profile

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Questions about Silga Teknika

I figured HomeGoods, but in what city?

about 19 hours ago
randallhank in Cookware

Questions about Silga Teknika

Hi Gooster,

Out of curiosity, where did you see these?

Randy

1 day ago
randallhank in Cookware

All Clad Stainless/LTD

The flared rims have me confused on this one.

1 day ago
randallhank in Cookware

Questions about Silga Teknika

That's the same as the one in my back left burner. 9.5" Teknika. It's a looker for sure. I don't know why it looks so huge in my pictures. Something about the angle. It holds 3.2 quarts I believe. The pan in front of it is the 2.3 quart Demeyere Atlantis which also looks big here.

Jan 27, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

questions about copper cookware

The thinner pot will heat up fastest. Is this really the question you meant to ask?

Jan 27, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

Has anyone used Baumalu copper pans?

Doesn't surprise me. I found a Baumalu pan at HomeGoods a few days ago that was over 2mm. They are really erratic, but that was the thickest one I've seen. I almost bought it, but the tin looked so crappy that I just couldn't pull the trigger.

Jan 27, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

Questions about Silga Teknika

Post a picture and I'll tell you what you got.

For the most part ignore the handles. There were some Ekologa pans produced with Teknika fittings and sold with Teknika lids as well. But the vessel itself and the base are Ekologa. Franz, aka Centurylife, and I both own these (I also own a few standard Teknika pans). They may have been produced for Williams Sonoma (W/S sold a selection of Silga pans about 5-6 years ago), or they may be a HomeGoods "special edition."

My guess from your description is that you got the 28cm Ekologa low saucepan (model# 200428). I really like this pan. It's about as even heating a sauté/rondeau as you will find. Overall, Silga is a great for saute and braising. On low to medium heat they will give very high end results on the stovetop, meaning they function exceedingly well as Dutch ovens. The lids and fittings are incredible, and they are built like tanks. Thick aluminum, high quality stainless.

Here are some photos. The first bunch is the low saucepan. The last two are my current setup, with the 28cm low sauce pan in the oven. The other, rounded, pan in the oven is a Teknika, as is the pan on the back left of the stove. The lid on the pan of front right burner is Teknika. It just happens to fit the 11" Proline skillet like a glove.

Let me know if I can help further.

Randy

Jan 27, 2015
randallhank in Cookware
1

Viking 7-ply saucepans: Are the lids heavy enough?

Viking lids are a bit heavier than All=Clad as I recall. Demeyere lids are a a bit heavier yet. If you want a truly heavy stainless lid, though, you need one of these:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Teknika-by-SI...

Jan 27, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

Demeyere Atlantis

I don't have any of the "conic" pans. I make grains all the time in the straight sided pans. I find that the ability to adjust the temp and have efficient transfer from the cooktop to the base of the pan allows me to control the environment/temperature perfectly inside a small to medium saucepan. The thinner conic pans would have an increased risk of scorching or sticking on the bottom at temperatures sufficient enough to take advantage of the heated sidewalls. Just a thought...

Jan 22, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

Demeyere Atlantis

I also have the 5.3 quart deep stockpot. At the time I bought it I would have preferred the dutch oven/casserole, but the stock pot was on sale for $140. As it turns out, I really like this small stocker much more than I would have thought. It's just big enough to boil pasta, and the deeper shape makes it perfect for small batches of stock/soup and using the immersion blender. Plus, the smaller footprint gives a bit of added versatility, both on the stovetop and in the cupboard. The only downside is that it doesn't go from stovetop to oven as conveniently because of the height. Thankfully I have several other options there. I really haven't felt a need for a larger stockpot since I bought it.

Jan 22, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

All-Clad C2 Copper Clad (Not Copper Core)

Interesting. Two of my four Demeyere pans are from BB&B. Neither has a blemish. However , the Mauviel has a very slight blemish. It was so small that I decided not to bother returning it. I have wondered about this in general with BB&B.

Jan 22, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

Demeyere Atlantis

See my post here:

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/1002805

For the money, the 11" Skillet is a great buy. The 4.2 quart sauté is more versatile, but even at 6'2"/250(ish) I found it heavy. The 5.5 quart casserole will serve you well. The 2.3 quart straight-sided saucepan is my most used pan.

Jan 21, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

All-Clad C2 Copper Clad (Not Copper Core)

Comments? It's All-Clad. You are paying way too much for what you are getting.

Here is my comment:

Bed Bath & Beyond inexplicably has the 11" Demeyere Proline skillet at just $199, which is $50-$70 below retail. And they will let you use a 20% off coupon, and give you free shipping. So for $160 you can have arguably the best non solid copper frypan out there -- and better than anything All-Clad makes. $160!!! You just have to come up out of All-Clad Canyon long enough to hit the "buy" button.

You're welcome.

Jan 21, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

All-Clad C2 Copper Clad (Not Copper Core)

Oy. Those prices are even worse than I thought they would be!

I bought my Mauviel m250c 10.2 inch frypan at Bed Bath and Beyond on Black Friday for $200 (using a 20% off coupon, of course). They appear to be out of stock now, but compare that to $290 for the CLEARLY inferior All-Clad you linked to and it just shows that AC takes us for suckers.

http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store...

Jan 21, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

All-Clad C2 Copper Clad (Not Copper Core)

Bingo. I saw a piece at HomeGoods, and could see the copper wasn't that thick.

Jan 21, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

All-clad 4 qt. soup pot vs 5 1/2 qt. dutch oven

Yes, scorching will not be an issue, but mostly because of materials, not thickness. The bases of straight-sided Demeyere Atlantis pans are "only" 3.8mm (though they look much thicker). The 2mm copper core is what makes the difference. So, not only is it more even-heating than the All-Clad, but it is also more responsive. The lids are nicer, as are the handles. The pans are treated with Silvinox, and the rivetless design makes for a hassle free cooking and cleaning experience.

At $290, the Staub is a complete waste, and should not be a serious consideration. Unless you are simmering highly acidic foods for 8 hours or more, I can't think of a single advantage. ECI heats unevenly, has durability issues, and is quite weighty for such a poor performer.

If you don't use induction, one last pan I would recommend is the Sitram Catering 5.4 quart braiser. The dimensions are such that is makes both an ideal Dutch oven and an excellent soup pot. You get 2mm of copper in the base, welded handles and a classic stainless look. Lifetime warranty. You'll have to purchase the lid separately, but with a couple of 20% off coupons you can have the whole setup for about $175. For high end performance I think it's the best bang for the buck out there.

http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store...

Or you can order straight from Amazon for the same money ($177 with 9.5" lid) with free shipping. But one word of warning: order this soon because I have a strong inclination they won't be around much longer:

http://www.amazon.com/Sitram-Catering...

Jan 21, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

All-clad 4 qt. soup pot vs 5 1/2 qt. dutch oven

I would want both sizes, but if I had to pick I would go with the Dutch oven. Four quarts is a great size for a medium sauté or rondeau, but aside from that, the DO is much more versatile, including and especially for soups.

I see W/S has a nice price on the soup pot though:
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/produc...

Meanwhile Bed Bath & Beyond is offering the stainless Dutch oven for $275. Less 20% and you are walking out the door for $220 plus tax. For that money though, I think you have to think long and hard about the copper core 6 quart covered roaster at $240 ($300 - 20%), or upgrading to Demeyere Atlantis for an extra $16 ($256):

http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store...

The 5.1 conic simmering pot is around the same price.

This, in a nutshell, is the problem with All-Clad pricing.

Randy

Jan 20, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

Measuring practical heat conductivity - Cast iron, aluminum, copper

It would be interesting to create a cookware timeline showing advancements in the last 100 years. We would of course have to start a new thread. I think it would be interesting to see what Hounds view as "advancements."

Jan 15, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

Measuring practical heat conductivity - Cast iron, aluminum, copper

I assume this will be made in America....

Jan 15, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

Measuring practical heat conductivity - Cast iron, aluminum, copper

Brilliant! Science fiction cookware fantasies!

Jan 13, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

Gourmet Kosher Mustard and Chinese Mustard in jars???

Bertman Ballpark Mustard

Jan 13, 2015
randallhank in Kosher

Measuring practical heat conductivity - Cast iron, aluminum, copper

Hi Kaleo,

"It's never the wrong time to correct misinformation."

This has turned into something like a full-time babysitting gig. It's like we have to monitor every cookware thread. Ridiculous!

- R

Measuring practical heat conductivity - Cast iron, aluminum, copper

"I think what Demeyere has achieved probably IS quite technical."

A good point. I guess I sort of assumed that anyone COULD achieve this, but that Demeyere was just the company that imagined a market for a thicker (heavier) clad skillet.

Jan 12, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

Measuring practical heat conductivity - Cast iron, aluminum, copper

Ok. So I 100% agree with you that the Proline is the only skillet to affectively push heat up the sidewalls.

So what does this imply about the utility of fully clad? To me, it means that at medium to high heat you are really considering two different cooking metrics, one horizontal and one vertical. At this heat level I am usually concerned much less with the vertical. On the other hand, at lower heat levels the relative differential between the sides and bottom is much less, so the advantages of fully ckad sides will rarely be utilized or even noticed.

Aside from those Prolines, clad is rarely very thick for my tastes. I want my cookware to be as much an extension (or even improvement) of the heat source as possible. That is why, given the choice, I'll take the potential of a high quality disc bottom (like say Paderno Grand Gourmet) over a 2.5mm fully clad vessel. It is also why copper trumps them both.

Randy

Jan 12, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

Measuring practical heat conductivity - Cast iron, aluminum, copper

Hi Kaleo,

"conductive sidewalls are not needed for frying in a sauté"

I think they are saying that conductive sidewalls are not particularly helpful for frying in a straight-side vessel.

"but are for frying in a frypan?"

Normally I would side with you here, but the curved sides of the Proline skillet are so conductive (and heat retaining) that you can dry cook chicken or steak pretty much like the bottom of the pan. Putting aside evaporative issues, the shape of a frypan, as opposed to a sauté, does have some advantages here. I find a sauté or rondeau to be overall more versatile, but I can sear a flat brisket off more easily in the proline than in the 11" sauté, and it's entirely as a result of the conductive sidewalls. The flip side of the coin is that if a pick a slightly smaller cut of meat, I can do the whole job, including the braise in the sauté.

"pap implying they're the only maker that has things figured out is comical."

No, they aren't the only one, and as I mention elsewhere, there are compromises with all cookware. But they do seem to be the company in clad that has created superior products both with fully-clad and disc base, without either suffering. They clearly have something figured out, and are perfectly willing to charge you an arm and a leg for it!

Ciao,

Randy

Jan 12, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

Measuring practical heat conductivity - Cast iron, aluminum, copper

"but how then do you explain the Industry5 line?"

I think it's fair to say Demeyere has their "ideal" line, and other quality configurations that are something less than ideal. It doesn't mean their philosophy is inconsistent.

If it was practical, in Demeyere's mind, to sell cookware with fully-clad 2mm of copper in stainless, they might very well do it. But this would create added weight and expense that might not be so practical. There are always compromises. The only question is did Demeyere make the right choices in designing their Atlantis line. I think they did. And they provided options at around the same price point.

Jan 12, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

Measuring practical heat conductivity - Cast iron, aluminum, copper

I think SOME people are over-thinking here. The advantages of Proline aren't magical, or even technical. It's a thick slab of aluminum. Sure, the design and build quality is way up there, but I give Demeyere credit for not re-inventing the wheel here. It's a big slab of aluminum with a nice handle. "Pro-line lite", which already exists, seems like a boon for the manufacturer, not the customer.

- R

Jan 12, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

Measuring practical heat conductivity - Cast iron, aluminum, copper

"That's true for stuff like water, but less true for thick stews, where thick sidewalls would help. How many people actually do that, though? Is that a real need?"

This is why I don't mind not having actively heated side walls on most of my pans. With my Silga pans I do braise a chicken on the stovetop (and they come out perfect), but I am rarely going to cook a beef stew from start to finish on the range. And even if I did, I could argue that having a superior base is going to maintain overall temperature over time better than an inferior base with heated sidewalls. As Kaleo points out, the question is "what is the marginal betterment of having conductive sidewalls?" I think it largely depends upon the options but, generally speaking, the advantages of a better base outweigh the advantages of heated sidewalls.

- R

Jan 12, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

Why limited warranty for this?

Made in Indonesia. It's just fine as Asian-made stuff goes. Not nearly as good as the Atlantis/Proline stuff, but probably a tad better than what Rosle is importing. There are a whole bunch of pans out there from China that are probably just as good for half the money. I'd spend my money on the real stuff.

Jan 11, 2015
randallhank in Cookware

Measuring practical heat conductivity - Cast iron, aluminum, copper

LOL. Sorry, I've been away. I needed a good laugh. Thanks, buddy.

Jan 08, 2015
randallhank in Cookware