scoopG's Profile

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Where are the best Chinese restaurants in New York?

Let's be a little more clear here...

Wei was a college student at NYU for four years, she may even have graduated. If she contributed to the Village Voice it was on their blog as far as I can tell. Robert Sietsema was the VV restaurant critic during her years in NYC. If you can provide any links to her Chinese restaurant reviews or Chinese food articles from the VV please do!

Her views in that article are not new - you have been saying the same thing for years. So she is really rehashing your argument...

She has stopped posting on CH, right? Ever since LA hounds called her out for using CH to do her legwork:

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/901326

Where is the best kosher food in Manhattan?

One place to search is here:
http://chowhound.chow.com/boards/28

Jan 23, 2015
scoopG in Manhattan

Fermented Napa cabbage (酸白菜, sour cabbage) – sharing how to make it at home and some basic recipes

In northeastern China, pickling of vegetables is done in just about every home - so recipes will vary. Salt is often used. Another common method is to wash the cabbage quickly and let dry outside for two days before pickling. I've seen online recipes in Chinese that call for about six tablespoons of salt for five lbs of cabbage.

Jan 22, 2015
scoopG in Home Cooking

Recs for Flushing next Wednesday?

Good idea. You will be near E-Pie, so add them to the tour.
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/992181

Jan 19, 2015
scoopG in Outer Boroughs
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Sweet Sixteen Restaurants -

Here is the most recent thread on this:
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/986323

Jan 19, 2015
scoopG in Manhattan

steamed sea bass chinese banquet what size help!

Fresh fish/seafood is expensive. It is a very perishable item and cannot keep. How close are you to a fishmonger? For example, in Chinatown recently at fish markets I've seen very fresh Porgies on sale for only $1.99 a lb. That is an excellent value. I have never seen a Porgy on Chinese menu here yet they are abundant and available year round. Go figure. You might be able to buy some fresh fish near you and bring it to the restaurant and have them cook it for you. (If that is do-able, a nice gesture would be to present Mr. Lam with fresh fish of his own).

Personally I'd skip the sushi and go for more Chinese dishes. If the egg rolls truly are great, serving one half to each guest is kind of cheap, no? Don't rave about them then!

Jan 18, 2015
scoopG in Manhattan

Mature Shanxi Vinegar

It should be available at the Chinese grocery stores in Manhattan or Flushing. I've bought before Shanxi Aging Vinegar, 420 ml (14.8 oz) bottle for around $2.50. It is aged three years.

山西陈醋 Shānxī chéncù: Shanxi Mature Vinegar

Jan 17, 2015
scoopG in Manhattan

Recs for Flushing next Wednesday?

To round up, you can also check in on these spots on the way to Kung Fu as well perhaps!

Fragrant Shandong Garden:
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/709290

Yi Lan (Tianjin Halal):
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/771124

Lok Lok (Cantonese):
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/977668

HLY (Northern):
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/886070

Jan 17, 2015
scoopG in Outer Boroughs
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Recs for Flushing next Wednesday?

Have not been to Rural of HK of GS in a long time....

Rural (Northeastern Chinese):
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/711399

Hunan Kitchen of Grand Szechuan:
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/708325

Jan 17, 2015
scoopG in Outer Boroughs
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Recs for Flushing next Wednesday?

Shanghai Cuisine 33 is the sister restaurant to Shanghai Asian Manor on Mott & Mosco, right?
--------------
Yes.

Shanghai Cuisine 33:
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/891886

Jan 17, 2015
scoopG in Outer Boroughs
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Wan Chai Seafood in Flushing - Excellent

Thanks much for this report. Their menu shows lots of seafood - do they have a fish tank?

Jan 16, 2015
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Recs for Flushing next Wednesday?

Kung Fu is about a 20 minute walk from Main Street and Roosevelt Avenue - and much closer from Dumpling Galaxy.

Jan 16, 2015
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

In response to avoiding "Pesky Americans!" (Yankees)

Thanks. For the purposes of this discussion I am only interested in the discoveries you have made and posted about on CH.

In six years of posting, you have participated on 21 threads. You have initiated 13 threads - five in this month alone. In 11 of your initiated threads you have asked for advice on where to eat or drink. You have been given lots of what appears to be good advice. Have you ever reported back?

In your trips to Paris since 2008, there have been no serendipitous local or neighborhood discoveries on your own that you reported on CH?

Jan 15, 2015
scoopG in France
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In response to avoiding "Pesky Americans!" (Yankees)

Sorry, I still will contend that this "information age," "electronic communication," and what was called in Kubrick's 2001 A Space Odyssey "Hal," has altered the landscape dramatically, having a dark and disturbing effect on our universal culture. Yes, it has improved life in many ways for many people, but the technology revolution has also destroyed much in its wake, much like a Tsunami. Discovery, individualism and innocence are being washed away.
------------------------------
And yet, in most if not all of your original posts you come asking "where to eat?" Do you have any original reviews yourself - of places (revolutionary or not) you have discovered away from the well-worn paths?

Jan 14, 2015
scoopG in France
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Vicky Lau named Asia’s best female chef

You mean Veuve Clicquot chef of the year. This is merely a champagne promotion.

Jan 12, 2015
scoopG in China & Southeast Asia

Restaurant Review: Kappo Masa on the Upper East Side

Jan 06, 2015
scoopG in Manhattan

Chinatown Banquets and Dish Selection

I wish I knew why most Chinese restaurants do not offer better whole fish options. Saw Porgies in Chinatown yesterday at $1.99 a pound. Very fresh and a very good value. Porgies are available and abundant year round...

Jan 04, 2015
scoopG in Manhattan

Chinatown Banquets and Dish Selection

Any Chinese restaurant will be able to offer you a banquet. My guess is swanee is referring to having deep pockets for the fresh fish and seafood selections at Lake Pavilion. I assume they offer more than the ubiquitous, tasteless and nutrition-less Tilapia.

Jan 02, 2015
scoopG in Manhattan

Accommodating a Party Guest-What is Reasonable?

Can you explain how this "binge eater" is going to recognize you under your normal CH user name?

Odd. Most binge eaters are ashamed to binge in public.

Dec 31, 2014
scoopG in Not About Food

Han Dynasty

Dec 29, 2014
scoopG in Manhattan

Grand Szechuan Near Bloomington Mn Cub Foods

OK, thanks.

Dec 23, 2014
scoopG in Minneapolis-St. Paul

Grand Szechuan Near Bloomington Mn Cub Foods

Put your review on CH here. I am not clicking on any link to a blog.

Chefs change and it is important to continually re-visit these places to monitor quality. I was not impressed with GS based on my visit four years ago. The issue I have when visiting the Twin Cities is that all depends on where I am staying and on how far I am willing to drive.

Dec 23, 2014
scoopG in Minneapolis-St. Paul

456 vs Shanghai Heping for XLB?

Haven't been to either recently but I think you will be satisfied at both.

456:
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/770707

Shanghai Heping:
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/841090

Dec 22, 2014
scoopG in Manhattan

Bok choy

Try bringing them into the kitchen and having them help you when you cook. When children are invested and allowed to make some choices it will be much easier and they will have less reason to reject something they had some input into creating.

Dec 19, 2014
scoopG in Home Cooking
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Being "put to work" at a Christmas Party

Suck it up and do whatever Roz says. You are her beatch.

Cilantro, new Chinese near Harvard Square

Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) is an annual herb which produces two products: the coriander seed (from its dried mature fruit) and its leaves, known in the US by the plant’s Spanish name, cilantro. It is sometimes incorrectly called Chinese parsley. According to Bruce Cost, it is the most heavily consumed fresh herb on the planet.

There is written evidence in Chinese that it appeared there by the sixth century (C.E.) where it is known as 胡荽 húsuī or 芫荽 yánsui for coriander and 香菜 xiángcài for cilantro. The German Sinologist and anthropologist Berthold Laufer (1874-1934) reckons the herb arrived in China via Persia and the Chinese name 胡荽 húsuī may represent a transcription of the Persian name for it: koswi. It may also have arrived by sea or overland in China from India.

Both the seed and leaves are widely used in China, much as a western cook would use parsley; serving as a garnish and for flavoring in both fish and fowl dishes like the Cantonese Duck with Coriander and Suzhou Steamed Floured Carp among others.

The fruit, leaves and root are all used in traditional Chinese medicine, particularly for stomach disorders. The leaves contain good amounts of calcium, iron and vitamins A and C. The seed is very high in riboflavin, calcium and iron.

ETA:

Cilantro is quite popular in Northeastern Chinese cuisine, where it is used to make Tiger Salad. Once at a staff meal in Flushing, I observed the staff from Golden Palace eating a dish from the cilantro roots. Photo below.

Cilantro Roots with Hot Pepper Sauce
拌香菜根 - bànxiāngcàigēn

Tiger Salad:
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/10/din...

Dec 08, 2014
scoopG in Greater Boston Area

Xiao Dong Bei in Flushing

Sorry, that was off the Chinese menu. It is:
紅燒肉燉白菜 - hóngshāoròu dùnbáicài
Red-cooked Pork and Cabbage Stew

What did you have?

Dec 04, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Xiao Dong Bei in Flushing

I am not sure. I think it is more certain dishes, like Gong Bao Chicken, Cumin Lamb etc. and variations thereof that spread. I once asked the former owners of M&T (the Qingdao place in Flushing) now in Rowland Heights about the Shandong Beef Roll and they were not readily familiar with it. The other Qingdao place in Flushing has never served it as far as I know. I did not see it in eight days in Shandong Province in 2010, not that it doesn't exist there! But I certainly don't buy Clarissa Wei's claim that it is a dish with over a thousand year history.

Dec 04, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Roast goose

There are many reasons why goose is not more popular in the US. Nearly 97% of poultry production here is chicken (broilers), chicken eggs and turkeys. Geese represent only 0.02% of the total production.

Geese farming is more popular in Asia and Central Europe where they are better suited to smaller farms.

Raising geese is more complicated than chickens, especially where down and feathers are involved. Special equipment is required as they are not easy to kill: they have many pinfeathers that are difficult to remove.

Geese are excellent grass foragers and thrive best when kept naturally protected from predators. They are picky eaters. One acre will support only 20-40 geese. They do not do well in enclosed spaces and their overall reproductive rate is comparatively low. They are not prolific egg layers, producing only one quarter of the amount of eggs that chickens do. Geese are usually slaughtered in November in the US and then frozen.

http://www.agmrc.org/commodities__pro...

Nov 25, 2014
scoopG in Greater Boston Area

Xiao Dong Bei in Flushing

Xiao Dong Bei (Little Northeastern) is the latest northeastern Chinese restaurant in Flushing – from owners Chef Hou Qiang (候强 - Hóu Qiáng ) and his wife Wang Chunling (王春玲 - Wáng Chūnlíng). Chef Hou is from Fushun, in Liaoning province and Ms. Wang is from Heilongjiang. They’ve been open about 16 months. It’s not large (but is bright and clean) with only eight tables and about 44 seats. Both times I was there they were fairly busy.

Xiao Dong Bei features a pan-Chinese menu with lots of Sichuan and Shanghai dishes in addition to Northeastern Chinese fare. It shows the popularity and spread of Sichuan and Shanghai style cuisines within China’s cities. A house specialty (which I did not try) is Steamed Fish Head with Chilies – originally a Hunan dish. Another is Fish Fragrant Pork – which has found its way onto American-Chinese menus.

The dumplings (Sour Cabbage and Pork; Leek, Shrimp and Egg) were solid northeastern presentations. Dried Fish with Korea Sauce was mildly spicy, cold and delicious. Their signature dishes were Twice Cooked Pork with Garlic Shoots – with homemade cured bacon and Conch with Special House Sauce. I've eaten far too many Twice Cooked Pork dishes recently but this is the best so far. The conch was expertly cooked and very tender. A surprise was Mixed Assorted – a plate of cold vegetables with a bean sauce on the side for dipping. Ms. Wang told me eating raw vegetables has been a staple of Northeastern Chinese cuisine at least for the past 30 years – especially right after harvest time. The salty and slightly hot jarred bean sauce was supplemented with eggs and ground pork. A slightly sweet Shredded Pork dish was served with sheets of tofu skin for wrapping. Red-cooked Pork with Cabbage Stew was a large hearty bowl of goodness.

The menu is in both English and Chinese – although they said they are getting ready to switch to their winter Chinese menu. They even have a large menu in English and Chinese with color photos. The staff is very friendly with at least two waiters named Michael - including one who used to work at Golden Palace. They offer about 24 lunch (11:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.) specials for $5.79 and that includes soup and rice.

Xiao Dong Bei (小東北 xiǎodōngběi)
133-51 37th Ave. (between Prince Street & College Point Blvd).
Flushing, NY 11354
Tel: 718-353-8998

Open everyday from 11:30 a.m. to midnight

Slideshow:
http://scoopg.smugmug.com/photos/swfp...

Nov 24, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs
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