scoopG's Profile

Title Last Reply

Help a pressed for time NY Hound find the Asian food of her dreams?

Thanks. I will look for them!

Aug 13, 2014
scoopG in San Francisco Bay Area

Help a pressed for time NY Hound find the Asian food of her dreams?

Are you saying that while you did not run into the term, say "chow fun" - do you think the dish did not exist or perhaps it was under a different name - Chinese or English?

Aug 13, 2014
scoopG in San Francisco Bay Area

Help a pressed for time NY Hound find the Asian food of her dreams?

Thanks. In the interest of clarification, the Chinese Exclusion Act was repealed in 1943. Chinese were now “free” to immigrate but at the old 1924 law, which was based on numbers from the 1890 census, which was minimal. The War Brides Act of 1945 allowed some 7500 Chinese women who had married American servicemen to emigrate. The McCarran-Waller Act of 1952 allowed greater numbers of Chinese students in to study.

Aug 13, 2014
scoopG in San Francisco Bay Area

Help a pressed for time NY Hound find the Asian food of her dreams?

Now you are saying something different it seems...

Anecdotal experience is often spectacular but usually not representative. What direct primary research have you done outside of your own personal experience? What direct archival research can you provide - that established historians I have cited can offer on both fronts?

Are not your "published articles" mostly self-published and on the web only? Anything that I have read by you (while interesting) is your view of the Chinese-American culinary experience. So I would call you an editorialist, not a documentarian or historian.

Aug 13, 2014
scoopG in San Francisco Bay Area

Help a pressed for time NY Hound find the Asian food of her dreams?

Actually before the completion of the transcontinental railroad in 1869, dirty laundry was shipped from San Francisco to Hongkong for processing. It was faster from San Francisco to Hongkong by ship than it was from the east coast of the US to San Francisco – as ships had to sail around Cape Horn until the Panama Canal opened in 1914. Long before then, the Chinese cornered the market in domestic laundries in the US.

Aug 12, 2014
scoopG in San Francisco Bay Area

Help a pressed for time NY Hound find the Asian food of her dreams?

While Chinese generally settled only certain parts of the country in any numbers during the early 20th century (e.g. California, New York)
________________________________________

Where are you getting your information?

The Chinese footprint is all over the old American West in the 19th century. They fanned out from San Francisco in large numbers. In the 1850’s thirty fishing camps were established on the California coast. They opened a fish processing plant in Monterey Bay. The first Chinese language newspaper, The China Daily News began circulating in Sacramento in 1856. Ah Bing developed a cherry hybrid in Oregon in 1875 – known today as the Bing Cherry. The Chinese were the first to realize the value of the wild mustard that grows in Napa Valley.

Chinese miners were among the first “foreigners” to settle in Oregon (1852) Nevada (1855) and Idaho (1859.) Chinese mining camps were also established in the Washington territory, Wyoming, Montana, South Dakota and Alaska.

They brought both Chinese medicine, which was highly valued by the White settlers and a gambling game called White Pigeon Ticket, or as it is known today: Keno. Restaurateur Quong Gee Kee was well known in Tombstone (AZ) and friendly with Doc Holiday and the Earp brothers. He died at age 96 in 1938 and was buried in Boothill Cemetery. Chuck Ah Fong was widely respected in Idaho as a physician, apothecary and acupuncturist and upon his wife’s death in 1902 more than a thousand people, including the Governor, attended her funeral.

It’s all here:

Kuo, John Wei Tchen. New York Before Chinatown: Orientalism and the Shaping of American Culture 1776-1882. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999.

Kwong, Peter and Miscevic. Chinese America: The Untold Story of America’s Oldest Community.” New York: The New Press, 2005

Help a pressed for time NY Hound find the Asian food of her dreams?

Bamboo pith is so over!

I guess all NYC can offer for the time being is the Shanghai style one made with a thin pancake, at 456 on Mott Street. Photo below. I think there are innovative ideas being executed through the house specials that some Chinese restaurants (particularly in the Fuzhou and Northeastern Chinese joints) offer.

Aug 12, 2014
scoopG in San Francisco Bay Area

music to chowhound by

Radio Paradise

Eclectic music, commercial free 24/7:
http://www.radioparadise.com/rp_2.php?#

Aug 12, 2014
scoopG in Not About Food

Help a pressed for time NY Hound find the Asian food of her dreams?

Perhaps because the Cantonese population is declining?

The population in Manhattan’s Chinese did fall 22% from 2000 to 2010 as gentrification continues.

NYC has great Fujian, Northeastern Chinese and Xian food as well.

(I will have to explore more this Shandong Beef roll - I have never seen it offered in the Shandong restaurants in NYC - and it is not on the menu at the M&T in Roland Heights, CA either.)

While Manhattan's Chinatown saw declining numbers, the Asian population continues to be the fastest growing segment of the population in NYC - now 15% of the total population in NYC. (45% of all Asians in NYC are Chinese.) 77% of all Chinese in NYC now live in Queens or Brooklyn.

According to the 2010 Census, the Chinese population in NYC grew 33% from 2000 to 2010: 350,000 to 475,000. Add Sunset Park East and Bensonhurst West to destination areas as they now now have more Chinese than Manhattan’s Chinatown. Figures cited are from the Asian American Federation.

AAF:
http://www.aafny.org/index.asp

Aug 12, 2014
scoopG in San Francisco Bay Area

Weird Dumpling Crepe Thing, Possibly Shanghai (in Flushing)

That makes sense for a Taiwanese place as Chunghua Road is a well known street in Taipei - not far from the bustling Ximending.

Aug 11, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Lunch with the girls

How about one of the places recommended from your previous five visits over the past two years? Have you reported back here on any of your meals?

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/918069
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/893168
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/857258
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/843115
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/829928

Aug 11, 2014
scoopG in Manhattan

Weird Dumpling Crepe Thing, Possibly Shanghai (in Flushing)

A flour and water slurry mixture is added to the pan while the dumplings are cooking, as per Andrea Nguyen's blog (with recipe), linked above. Photos below:

Aug 07, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Nan Xiang Xiao Long Bao (Flushing)....Any Better Successors?

Kung Fu in Queesnboro Hill, on Main Street seems to be a preferred spot.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/913800

http://www.yelp.com/biz/kung-fu-xiao-...

Aug 07, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Favorite Xiao Long Bao ( soup dumplings) in Queens?

Aug 06, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Weird Dumpling Crepe Thing, Possibly Shanghai (in Flushing)

Perhaps they are a Japanese "invention" by way of China. This style pan fried dumpling is all over the Chinese web as Kaifeng Pan-Fried Dumplings.

Andrea Nguyen Blog:
http://www.asiandumplingtips.com/2009...

Kaifeng Pan Fried Dumplings:
http://www.xiangha.com/techan/197032....

Bites of Kaifeng:
http://www.henanart.com/wenhua/yinshi...

Chinese Baidu/Wiki:
http://baike.baidu.com/view/852443.htm

Aug 06, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs
1

Weird Dumpling Crepe Thing, Possibly Shanghai (in Flushing)

Jim, if you are looking for Henan dishes, why not try Henan Fengwei on 41st Avenue? Big Plate Chicken is a specialty - although it seems that dish originated from further west, in Xinjiang! I've not tried this particular vendor in the mall there yet.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/728696

Aug 05, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Weird Dumpling Crepe Thing, Possibly Shanghai (in Flushing)

I think Tung Po Pork or Dong Po Rou (東坡肉 - Dōng pō ròu) is one of those dishes that has migrated around China. Although Dong Po today is widely thought of as a Shanghai dish its origins appear to be from Kaifeng or even Hangzhou – when those cities were capitals of the Northern and then Southern Song Dynasties.

Aug 05, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Weird Dumpling Crepe Thing, Possibly Shanghai (in Flushing)

I think it is a type of dumpling that originated in Kaifeng, a major city in Henan province.

Aug 05, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Trip down Memory Lane: Nom Wah Tea Parlor

Aug 05, 2014
scoopG in Manhattan

Hong Kong - Yung Kee Roast Goose re-visited

May I ask what years you lived there?

Aug 03, 2014
scoopG in China & Southeast Asia

Egg Rolls with crispy burnt tips?

Lumpia Shanghai and Nem rán/Chả giò are assembled with raw meat and then deep fried? Are they really thin?

In Chinese-American style egg rolls, the ingredients (ground pork or turkey meat, cabbage, shrimp, bean sprouts etc.) are cooked (meat) or quickly blanched (vegetables) in boiling water first. The ingredients are allowed to separately drain a little, then mixed.

Spices (soy sauce, white pepper) are added and then the mixture is allowed to drain well before final assembly.

The purpose of deep frying them is to really only heat them up and get the exterior skin golden brown. (In many Chinese-American restaurants the egg rolls are deep fried twice. First right after initial assembly and then when they are ordered. After the first deep fry they can then be stored in the fridge or freezer.)

If the oil is hot enough, it won't seep into anything you fry. Soggy, oily egg rolls are due to too low oil temperature.

Hong Kong - Yung Kee Roast Goose re-visited

Thanks klyeoh for this update. When I lived in Hongkong for five years our offices were just down the road and Yung Kee was a regular luncheon ritual. It was also the best place to get taxi's in the rain.

Aug 02, 2014
scoopG in China & Southeast Asia

"Artisan" Western-style bread in Flushing

You originally wrote “in China, baking was never established as one of their primary cooking techniques due to the lack of plentiful fuels, which is why the stir frying wok technique was developed to cook foods quickly using less fuel.”
______________________________

I disagree. I have not seen any scholarly evidence that there were any widespread fuel shortages throughout China’s ancient history or that the development of stir-frying was due to supposed lack of fuel. The Chinese from antiquity had a wide range of cooking styles available to them (boiling, deep frying, smoking, steaming and roasting etc.)

Certainly the ancient Chinese had bread. Since antiquity the Chinese had contact with Iran and Inner Asia and the baked goods these peoples produced - although they did not become a major part of the Chinese diet.

In northern China, wheat and maize were turned into breads – both steamed and fried. In the northwest (Xinjiang) yeast and sourdough bread was mainly how wheat was consumed. And this bread was usually made in circular ovens. The ancient Chinese milled barley, buckwheat and sorghum into flour to create cakes.

Sources:

1) “Food in China: A Cultural and Historical Inquiry.” Frederick J. Simoons. CRC; Boca Raton, 1991.

Chapter Three (Cereals and Pulses). Page 89 is where he discusses these ancient Chinese contacts with neighbors in Iran and Inner Asia who produced oven-baked breads. Later “Western influence, especially in the cities with large Western communities such as Shanghai encouraged the use of yeast bread.”

Chapter Eight (Edible Nuts, Nut-Like Fruits, and Seeds). On page 286 he writes that while cooking oils were in considerable use since Han times (when the wok and stir-frying were invented) they were expensive. “Even in modern times, stir-frying is less common than boiling and steaming, more used in restaurants than at home.”

2) “Food in Chinese Culture: Anthropological and Historical Perspectives.” Edited by K. C. Chang, Yale University Press; New Haven, 1977.

Chapter Three (T’Ang) by Edward H. Schafer. On pages 116-118, he claims that baking was already a common form of cooking by 800 CE - especially “baking something in a wrapping of some kind.” Tang texts he declares, paid the “greatest attention to cakes” which were highly popular. The word cake appears so often that they appear to be “the gold of the Tang dinner table.”

While certain cereals were preferred, they were cooked in a variety of ways. One cake was made of barley and wrapped in hemp leaves – but the most popular “cakelets were made of wheat or rice.”

Looks the Chinese may have invented doughnuts around this time – as they made a sweet “ring-shaped cake fried in oil.” Foreign cakes introduced from the West also became quite popular. Shafer asserts that Iranians “for the most part,” sold them on urban street corners. There are Tang references to a pastry (called pi-lo) that were either sweet or aromatic.

Chapter Five (Yuan and Ming) by Frederick W. Mote. On pages 216-217, he writes about a Ming scholar in the 1590’s who composed a list of the “prepared foods which the empress and imperial consorts offered each day in the reign of the Founder in Nanking” some 220 years earlier.

This was a complicated month-long presentation in which the foods offered changed every day. Because the offerings “were expected to convey the spirit of offerings made to the ancestors in ordinary family life we can reveal that they reveal the tastes and food ideals of the former poor peasant family which now found itself the imperial family” in 14th century China. Among the many foods presented at court:

Sugared butter cookies
Steamed rolls with steamed mutton
Sugared steamed biscuits
Sugared jujube cakes
Open oven-baked breads (or Shāobing 燒餅)
Sugar filled steamed breads
Mutton filled steamed breads
Rice-flour cakes
Fat-filled pastries
Honey cakes
Puff-paste baked breads
Flaky filled pastries
Marrow cakes
Rolled cookies
Honey biscuits
Scalded-dough baked breads (the world’s first bagels?)
Pepper and Salt breads
Sesame-sugar filled baked breads
Sour Cream and
Thousand-layer baked breads.

3) “Chinese History: A Manual” by Endymion Wilkinson. Harvard University Press; Cambridge, 2000. In Chapter 35 (Agriculture, Food, and the Environment) on page 639, Wilkinson writes that the Han Chinese used a mud-baking technique and developed elaborate cooking stoves. The Chinese used open roasting, deep-frying, boiling, braising and steaming. The most popular cooking method though was stewing.

On pages 647-648 Wilkinson says that while the wok may have been introduced in the Han it was mainly used for drying grains…it began to become one of the more important cooking methods only in the Ming.

He adds that he 17th century novel “The Plum in the Golden Vase” (Jīn Píng Méi 金瓶梅) includes references to only five or six stir-fry recipes out of a total of more than one hundred dishes mentioned. Even by the 18th century, wok dishes accounted for only 16 percent of the recipes in the most famous recipe book of the day, Suíyuán Shídān 隨園食單.

Aug 02, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

"Artisan" Western-style bread in Flushing

Read "Food in China: A Cultural and Historical Inquiry" by Frederick J. Simmons; Boca Raton, FL, 1991 and "Food in Chinese Culture: Anthropological and Historical Perspectives," edited by K. C. Chang, Yale University Press; New Haven, 1977.

Jul 31, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Charcoal Pit - Wilmington, DE

Maybe you were subliminally influenced by the recent visit by POTUS?

Did the Charcoal Pit ever serve up good burgers? Johnnies is just dishing up fast food hot dogs.

Lucky's on 202 is your best burger bet, with Hollywood Grill a distant two.

http://www.delawareonline.com/story/n...

http://luckyscoffeeshop.com/

Jul 26, 2014
scoopG in Mid-Atlantic

French Laundry solo? [Yountvile]

The link there shows two alternatives for the OP to find fellow diners that might be of help.

Jul 24, 2014
scoopG in San Francisco Bay Area

French Laundry solo? [Yountvile]

Jul 24, 2014
scoopG in San Francisco Bay Area

"Artisan" Western-style bread in Flushing

There was no shortage of fuel in ancient China. Boiling, deep frying, smoking, steaming and roasting and were the order of the day then. While it is thought that the wok was first used during the Han Dyansty, stir-frying as we know it today did not really come into its own until the Ming. Fuel shortages in China are of a more recent problem. Access to cooking oil was more of an issue.

Certainly the ancient Chinese had bread. Since antiquity the Chinese had contact with Iran and Inner Asia and the baked goods these peoples produced - although they did not become a major part of the Chinese diet.

In northern China, wheat and maize were turned into breads – both steamed and fried. In the northwest (Xinjiang) yeast and sourdough bread was mainly how wheat was consumed. And this bread was usually made in circular ovens. The ancient Chinese milled barley, buckwheat and sorghum into flour to create cakes.

By the Tang Dynasty small sesame covered breads were sold in major Chinese cities – the forerunner of todays shaobing. Meat was stuffed into them and they were served like sandwiches. In the 1930’s, Princeton scholar Sydney Gamble (1890-1968) documented that yeast bread was widely consumed in Beijing by wealthy Chinese families.

Jul 23, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs
1

starving in Times Square....

How about something from your three previous requests for information, two of which mention Times Square?

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/982843
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/982270
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/981243

Chow-worthy places in Wiimington Riverfront?

It's an excellent downtown choice.
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/907051

Jul 19, 2014
scoopG in Philadelphia