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Weird Dumpling Crepe Thing, Possibly Shanghai (in Flushing)

Your blog post mentioned Rural. Glad to know they are still around. http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/711399

Oct 22, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

E-Pie in Flushing: Sweet, Savory Xianbing and More from Eastern China

Yes, they only serve take-out. As Peter mentioned, the New World, or even the Flushing Mall is a nearby sit-down possibility.

Oct 16, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

E-Pie in Flushing: Sweet, Savory Xianbing and More from Eastern China

Companions Wonder Boy and Anya reminded me to advise folks to bring either a bib or a bucket here to handle the juices from the meat xianbing.

Oct 15, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

E-Pie in Flushing: Sweet, Savory Xianbing and More from Eastern China

A great addition to Flushing.

Oct 14, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Calling ScoopG, Lau, et al. 飯團 in Flushing?

Thanks for reporting back Mr. Taster. I can report with confidence that Flushing now has hot, fresh Xianbing for your next trip.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/992181

Oct 14, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

E-Pie in Flushing: Sweet, Savory Xianbing and More from Eastern China

E-Pie has been open for a few months, operating in the place that QQ Fruit and Flower Shop used to occupy, steps from the Roosevelt and Main street subway entrance. They do a brisk take-out business offering Xianbing - savory or sweet pies. (餡餅 – xiànbǐng; also known as huǒshāo 火燒.)

Four meat pies ($1.50 to $2.50) are for sale: Juicy Beef, Cumin Lamb, Select Pork and Tender Chicken. The Cumin Lamb and Select Pork Pies I tasted were both juicy and delicious. The
Sweet Red Bean and Sticky Black Rice pies ($1.50) will satisfy your sweet tooth. I found the Sweet Black Rice better only because it seemed less sweet. The grilled wheat bread is dense and chewy. They take about ten minutes to finish on one of their two George Foreman-style grills.

Not sampled were their braised items (滷水 - lǔshuǐ): Stewed Duck Necks, Wings, Tongues and Chicken Gizzards. They sell these by the box, starting at $5.50. Stewed Drumsticks are a buck each. They are also selling a Chicken Bento or Lunchbox for $4.99. The confidential braising liquid recipe I was assured comes from Yantai (煙台- Yāntái) a city of seven million in Shandong province. (Sorry LA hounds: no Shandong Beef Rolls.)

On hand are both hot Soy Milk and Millet Congee – sweet or plain. The Millet Congee was humble and appealing, an instant link to an ancient and primal food source. It also makes a perfect fortification to your morning oatmeal.

Also not sampled was a bowl of Zhajiang Mian – a quick lunch for the busy baker. Maybe that will one day be on the menu too. Until then I will be content with their pies.

E-Pie (食坊 - shífáng)
135-43 Roosevelt Avenue
Flushing, NY 11354
Tel: 347-348-7049

(Between Main and Prince Streets – north side of the street).

Open Mon. to Sat: 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Sunday open from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Slideshow:
http://scoopg.smugmug.com/photos/swfp...

Day 3 in HK, Luk Yu Tea House and Shun Kee Typhoon Shelter

Thanks WW for your reports and photos! (Send me your address so I can Fedex some napkins to you! :) )

Calling ScoopG, Lau, et al. 飯團 in Flushing?

Hi Mr Taster, this might help....

Tianjin Xianbing, Golden Shopping Mall, 41-28 Main Street, Stall D1
http://chopsticksandmarrow.com/2013/0...

66 Seafood – Taiwanese might be open, I know they are open late.
http://www.yelp.com/biz/66-lus-seafoo...

Older threads:
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/546619
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/486772

Oct 08, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Resource for Chinatown/ East Village food tour?

Oct 07, 2014
scoopG in Manhattan

My Chinese supermarket items to get

Oct 07, 2014
scoopG in General Topics

Chinese specialty and gourmet stores?

Lorna is very friendly and knowledgeable. I believe many of her products are via Germany.

Oct 06, 2014
scoopG in Manhattan

Nan Xiang Xiao Long Bao (Flushing)....Any Better Successors?

These are the XLB at 456; hoping they are still the same size...

Oct 02, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Chinese specialty and gourmet stores?

Personally, I find New Beef King on Mott Street better than Ping’s. I know Ping’s has its fans here but to me walking in there is like walking into Grandma’s house when you were little and noticed a funny smell.

There used to be a Malaysian Beef Jerky place at 95A Elizabeth Street (between Grand and Hester) – not sure if they are still around.

http://www.newbeefking.com/products.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/07/nyr...

2008 and earlier threads:
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/547225
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/436174
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/208363

Oct 01, 2014
scoopG in Manhattan

Signs of a NOT Authentic Chinese Restaurant

In all the of the threads here, I thought you claimed that the use of pineapple in Sweet-and-Sour Chinese dishes was an American invention and denoted American-Chinese food, no? (Correct me if I am wrong, there are too many threads to open up to check).

Eugene Anderson and Fuchsia Dunlop have also written on the origins of Sweet-and-Sour Chinese dishes.

OK, will now have to dive back into Andrew Coe's "Chop Suey: A Cultural History of Chinese Food in the United States." I do know he says chop soly/chop suey started appearing in print in the US in the mid 1880's.

Oct 01, 2014
scoopG in General Topics

Signs of a NOT Authentic Chinese Restaurant

While Bruce Cost (Asian Ingredients: A Guide to the Foodstuffs of China, Japan, Korea, Thailand and Vietnam. William Morrow & Co; New York, 2000) agrees with the Malay/Amoy origin source, Rachel Laudan (“Cuisine and Empire: Cooking in World History.” University of California Press; Berkeley, 2013) claims ketchup is the Anglicization of ketap, the fish sauce brought back by the India trade.

It started appearing in cookbooks by the early 19th century and was a thin, vinegary and spicy brown liquid made from mushrooms, walnuts or anchovies - more akin to A1 or Worcestershire sauce than modern tomato ketchup.

Oct 01, 2014
scoopG in General Topics

Signs of a NOT Authentic Chinese Restaurant

We're agreed, prasantrin, that I recall reading specific documentation of the pineapple/onion/bellpepper variant originating as an adaptation BY Cantonese cooks working IN the Americas of a dish familiar to them from China, but that you and ScoopG do not recall seeing such documentation.
----------------------------------
It has been established that Cantonese cooks were using pineapple in some sweet-and-sour dishes in China before the same started appearing in North America.

Oct 01, 2014
scoopG in General Topics

Signs of a NOT Authentic Chinese Restaurant

In his history of American food, J. F. Mariani cites three Chinese restaurants already in SF by 1849.....
______________________________
Which book is this? I quickly did a search but came up empty...

Peter Kwong and Dusanka Miscevic also document that there were three Chinese restaurants in San Francisco in 1849.

Chinese America: The Untold Story of America’s Oldest Community.” Peter Kwong & Dusanka Miscevic. The New Press; New York, 2005

Sep 29, 2014
scoopG in General Topics

Signs of a NOT Authentic Chinese Restaurant

It is likely the use of pineapple in Sweet-and-Sour Chinese dishes originated in China.

The pineapple (along with papaya and guava) was a New World discovery – and there are two possible origins. First is that the Portuguese likely brought it from Malacca to Macao. It's first mention in Chinese accounts date only from the 17th century. From Macao it reached Guangdong, Hainan and Fuzhou. It was already known in Taiwan by 1650. The second possible route may have been from Burma to Yunnan.

In China pineapple growing and canning was carried out on a considerable scale, the fruit being eaten in large amounts by both rich and poor. Cantonese pineapples today are much smaller when compared to those in Hawaii and it gained a significant role as an ingredient in some sweet-and-sour dishes, especially with chicken and duck. There was a famous Cantonese dish that celebrated the dragon boat races that was called “Dragon-Boat Shrimp with Pineapple and Sweet-and-Sour Sauce.”

This from Frederick J. Simoons in "Food in China: A Cultural and Historical Inquiry." CRC Press; Boca Raton, 1991.

In more background information, according to Endymion Wilkinson (“Chinese History: A Manual.” Harvard University Press; Cambridge, 2000), Sweet-and-Sour Pork (gulurou 咕嚕肉 gū lū ròu) first appeared in the English language in the 1950’s but the dish was invented in Guangzhou in the 19th century to suit western tastes.

There already was an existing Cantonese dish sweet-and-sour spare ribs (糖酸排骨 táng suān pái gǔ) that foreigners did not like because of the bones. They did enjoy the sauce though, so a new boneless dish was created and given the name: gulurou or “complaining meat.”

(咕 gū is an onomatopoeia for the sound of a clucking hen or pigeon. It can also mean an empty stomach. 嚕 lū means long-winded, over elaborate; troublesome.)

The more polite name of the dish is Gulaorou (古老肉 gǔ lǎo ròu) or “meat in the ancient style.”

Fat Boy Homestyle Cooking in Flushing

Gee thanks erica! The Red-Cooked Tofu is not spicy at all.

Sep 22, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Chengdu, Xi'an in Flushing

I see it often as Braised Pork with Preserved Vegetables or Braised Pork Belly with Dry Chinese Vegetables.

Sep 22, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Fat Boy Homestyle Cooking in Flushing

I'd have to sample more dishes before calling it stellar but what I had was solid homestyle fare with friendly service. No lunch specials I’m afraid. Their dumplings are 10 for $6.00. They have 14 cold dishes starting at $5.95. Six soups for $5.00. Entrées start at $8.95.

Sep 18, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Fat Boy Homestyle Cooking in Flushing

The exterior signage boldly says Da Jing Hong Asian Food but red and yellow Chinese characters declare that this restaurant is known as Fat Boy Homestyle Cooking. (胖孩家常菜 - pàng hái jiā cháng cài). Look for the generic image of a roly-poly White fellow holding a pizza.

Fat Boy refers to friendly Chef Zhai Tao (翟涛 - Zhái Tāo) formerly of Henan Feng Wei on 41st Avenue. He left there about 18 months ago to open up this place and says that Da Jing Hong Asian Food is the English name of the incorporated business. There are about nine tables with 52 seats. The ambiance is better than Henan Feng Wei (and Spicy Village in Manhattan) and the menu is much broader.

The menu (in English and Chinese) provides both Henan favorites and Northern dishes. (Their handy take-out menu features important phone numbers for Traffic Violations, the Marriage License Bureau and Public Housing Applications among others).

A group of us settled into one of the two large round tables and ordered the following:

Sautéed Chicken Tripe with Hot Peppers
Red Cooked Tofu
Whole Fresh Steamed Tilapia
Big Plate Chicken
Stir-Fried Lettuce (misspelled “Lecture” on the menu).
Wok Vegetables
Dumplings with Pork and Cabbage

Standouts were the Red Cooked Tofu, Steamed Tilapia, Sautéed Chicken Tripe with Hot Peppers and Big Plate Chicken.

This was based on one visit and I’d like to return to explore more of the menu – especially their casseroles – they feature some 15 on the menu, including Short Rib, Beef Stew and Braised Fish with Napa Cabbage and Roasted Chilies. Some House Specials include Big Northern Casserole (北方大砂鍋 bēi fāng dà shā guō), Chinese Yams with Sausage (淮山小炒 huái shān xiǎo chǎo) and Steamed Pork Belly with Pickled Mustard Greens (梅菜扣肉 méi cài kòu ròu).

Fat Boy Homestyle Cooking / Da Jing Hong Asian Food
40-26 Union Street (between Roosevelt and 41st Avenues)
Flushing, NY 11354
Tel: 718-353-2816
Open everyday from 10:00 am to 11:00 pm.

Slideshow:
http://scoopg.smugmug.com/photos/swfp...

Sep 18, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Full House Cafe--Dim Sum Alternative in Chinatown

Full House is now Flaming Kitchen.

Sep 17, 2014
scoopG in Manhattan

Anybody Try First House Garden in Chinatown?

Thanks Dave - Michael is from Fuzhou BTW.

Sep 17, 2014
scoopG in Manhattan

Chengdu, Xi'an in Flushing

Sep 17, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Taking a trip to Flushing

I've already provided the chowhound link above.

Sep 17, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Taking a trip to Flushing

Here's Lau's April report:
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/971940

Plenty of supermarkets to choose from. Here's a start:

New World Mall - lower level/ground floor has a large Chinese grocery store.
136-20 Roosevelt Ave (at Main St.),
Flushing, NY 11354,

Hong Kong Supermarket
3711 Main St
Flushing, NY 11354

JMart
136-20 Roosevelt Ave
Flushing, NY 11354

Sep 17, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Dumpling Galaxy - Dumplings and more

Thanks Chris - an excellent primer with mouth-watering photos.

Sep 15, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs

Dumpling Galaxy - Dumplings and more

Dumpling Galaxy
42-35 Main Street (at Franklin Avenue)
Flushing, NY 11355
Tel: 718-461-0808

Open everyday from 8:30 am to 10:30 pm

Serious Eats:
http://www.seriouseats.com/2014/09/be...

Website:
http://www.dumplinggalaxy.com/

A good friend and reliable Chinese food maven, Wonder Ace, stopped in yesterday and tried four types of dumplings:

“I tried Lamb with Green Squash, Octopus, Duck with Mushrooms and Tofu. The dumplings were very fresh tasting and well prepared. The Lamb with Green Squash was the favorite.

I also tried two non-dumpling dishes: Water Spinach with Preserved Tofu Sauce and Beef with Peppers. Both were tasty.

It's inside a shiny new shopping mall. The decor is clean and modern, kind of a like a modern airport food court (think Jet Blue terminal at JFK). Dumpling Galaxy is a Dongbei restaurant that specializes in dumplings. It has a lot of the usual Dongbei specialties. Except for the Lamb Dumplings, their flavor was generally on the mild side, but still very good. They have one big table that can hold 8 to 12. I am ready to return any time.”

Sounds like a strong addition to Flushing food scene indeed.

Sep 15, 2014
scoopG in Outer Boroughs
1

Hong Kong - What area to stay in that is close to best restaurants?

Hongkong is very small and transportation is world class - no need to be confused about anything.

Sep 15, 2014
scoopG in China & Southeast Asia