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Your Best Recipe For Chicken Paprikash

no sour cream?..without that, CP wouldn't be as good, imo...and much hotter

Mar 14, 2014
jahogna in Home Cooking
1

Your Best Recipe For Chicken Paprikash

adding carrots (and I'm guessing you meant celery) would make it a little more french, but I'm sure it's good...just a little sweeter.

The immersion blender is one of my favorite new tools. It helps thicken soups/sauces without flour....and saves me from having to wash a full size blender jar.

Mar 12, 2014
jahogna in Home Cooking

Your Best Recipe For Chicken Paprikash

so I made chicken paprika a couple more times and have developed some changes...the main of which is simmering the chicken at least an hour.

I also now substitute veg oil for butter, bump up the paprika to 4 Tbsp and use 1.5 - 2 cups water (broth is unnecessary), which doesn't leave you wanting for more sauce. I added 2 bay leaves to the simmer (don't know if that helped, but it didn't hurt, either)

After simmering, I now use an immersion blender to puree all those slimey onions (which helps thicken the sauce, too). In fact, if you want even more sauce, you can put up to 2.5 cups water and just flour the chicken before searing to help thicken (in this case, you might want to add up to another Tbsp paprika).

I realized this recipe is actually similar to making a curry, so I may try substituting curry powder for paprika and yogurt for sour cream (or not). Considering, you can't really go wrong with simmering chicken in water, you could probably use taco seasoning or come up with your own spice mix combos...just be sure to take it easy on the five spice.

Mar 12, 2014
jahogna in Home Cooking

Kirkland Frozen Raw Shrimp

yes, the more shell the shrimp has, the better.

Even if the shrimp was bought peeled and only has the end tail/flipper part, you can save those a make a small amount of stock...it'll take a while to save up enough, but those will make enough stock for one or two small dishes.

Jan 03, 2014
jahogna in Chains

Kirkland Frozen Raw Shrimp

(RE: treb...don't know how my post made it down here)

in other words: ALL shrimp, wild or farmed, eat whatever is on the floor...including fecal matter.

If you want to hope your shrimp to have a diet lower in fecal matter, buy wild...but, remember, the rest of a wild shrimp's diet includes dead/rotten fish parts and whatever garbage and pollutants humans throw into the ocean.

Jan 03, 2014
jahogna in Chains

Your Best Recipe For Chicken Paprikash

I used the recipe on the "simply recipes" site. It's actually not that bad...except for the recommended "2-3 Tbsp butter" (oily) and only cooking it "35 min" (chicken was cooked, but hard to get off the bone). However, reading the comments section subconsciously swayed me into putting very little stock and less sour cream - throwing the spice/tangy ratio completely off and making the sauce too thick. It was days after I made it that the some of the memories of my neighbor's version came back to me.

Your mother's strained version sounds closer to my style; as cooked long onions are not particularly appetizing (too slimey and worm-like).

I used butter and definitely didn't burn the paprika. Maybe paprika of any sort just just doesn't really work with my palate anymore...it reminds me of "BBQ" potato chips, which I've grown to dislike. Plus, this dish seems unpleasantly rich compared to the light stir-fry mode I've been in lately. I'm going to make CP at least one more time with way more stock, sour cream and cook time...we'll see.

Jan 03, 2014
jahogna in Home Cooking

Your Best Recipe For Chicken Paprikash

Back in the 80s, my hungarian neighbor (first gen) made a delicious chicken paprika. Can't remember his technique, but I do know, contrary to what most people recommend, his was relatively soupy (in pot, chicken was practically covered with sauce). His had a lot of sour cream, with big white chunks still floating around, and the chicken cooked long enough to fall off the bone (an hour or more). He also used imported hungarian paprika, if that makes a difference.

First time I've made it, I followed an americanized chicken paprika recipe tonight...needs work as it didn't turn out well.

I don't recommend using smoked paprika because I used regular sweet paprika (not imported) and it still tasted too smokey. However, I'm guessing I'm not adding enough sour cream to temper that flavor.

Jan 01, 2014
jahogna in Home Cooking
1

Making Chinese Black Bean Sauce

yes, I've been looking for a bag of salted black beans, but am surprised none of the asian markets around here have them.

Jan 01, 2014
jahogna in Home Cooking

Chinese food cooking question...what kind of oil?

I just bought some more Lion Globe peanut oil and it's not nearly a strong a peanut flavor as my last bottle. Don't know if they are refining it more now or the flavor consistency just varies...all I know is I made some 5 spice shrimp with it tonight and it turned out absolutely delicious.

Anyway, keep it in the fridge and it'll keep from going rancid (or, rather, you'll use it up before that).

Dec 31, 2013
jahogna in Home Cooking

Kirkland Frozen Raw Shrimp

Maybe we just aren't as culinarily refined as some others on here, but, I also think frozen shrimp taste fine...it's when they add salt to them that absolutely ruins them for me. I'll add my own salt, thanks.

Dec 31, 2013
jahogna in Chains

Kirkland Frozen Raw Shrimp

I bought those and learned my lesson - do not buy brined frozen shrimp of any brand. The salt does something to this shrimp that makes them practically inedible, imo.

Size issues aside, the brine bleaches them so they don't turn their signature appetizing orange when cooked. Then, the saltiness overpowers any actual seafood flavor and doesn't allow one to add any other salt containing seasonings (soy sauce, etc).

The only thing these brined shrimp might be acceptable for is throwing them in a pot of water and making a stock...even then, you'll end up with a fully salted stock that isn't going to give you any leeway for later seasoning, if desired .

Dec 31, 2013
jahogna in Chains

Kirkland Frozen Raw Shrimp

Costco used to carry decent, unsalted frozen shrimp, but now it's all brined...and therefore ruined for most applications. Don't buy shrimp with added salt - sends a message to the companies doing this.

Dec 31, 2013
jahogna in Chains
1

Making Chinese Black Bean Sauce

I threw out my whole jar of Lee Kum Kee black bean sauce because I thought it tasted foul. I think the garlic they use is the main culprit, but there's also a bunch of other stuff in there that's not only low quality, but just doesn't belong.

Presently, I'm digging on a jar of "Caravelle" brand I got from the local asian market. It only has fermented black beans, soy oil, and sugar. The soy oil's smokey/perfumey flavor is a little too pronounced, but it's still the best pre-made stuff I've tasted.

Dec 29, 2013
jahogna in Home Cooking

Chinese food cooking question...what kind of oil?

I bought some of that Lion Globe and, although an excellent product, I thought it was way too peanuty tasting to be used straight as cooking oil...the intense flavor needs to be diluted with a neutral flavored oil. In fact, it's so strong, it could be used as a seasoning after cooking (like sesame oil).

Dec 25, 2013
jahogna in Home Cooking

Chinese food cooking question...what kind of oil?

I try not to use sesame oil because, it's so strong, it has a tendency to make every dish taste similar...it can become a bit of a crutch.

I'd never use it in, lets say, a dish in which I have black bean paste because it's just not necessary and would "muddy up" the dish.

Lately, I've only been using sesame oil in chow mein.

Dec 25, 2013
jahogna in Home Cooking

Chinese food cooking question...what kind of oil?

some cheaper, highly refined peanut oils don't have much peanut flavor...if any. On the other hand, the most expensive ones have too much peanut flavor, imo. It takes some trail and error find a the right balance of flavor/price...or dilute some of the powerful stuff with a neutral oil.

Anyway, if you're doing it right, standard veg oil can give you plenty of flavor (see my above post).

Dec 25, 2013
jahogna in Home Cooking

Chinese food cooking question...what kind of oil?

We have one excellent chinese (szechuan) restaurant nearby...and many very bad ones. By their trash, I saw they use standard vegetable oil...which makes sense, considering peanut oil is relatively expensive.

For a home cook, quality peanut oil is an option for flavor development (although the "extra virgin" stuff is so strong, it needs diluting...or, like sesame oil, used as seasoning). However, restaurants don't need it because they deal in such volume, their re-used vegetable fry oil is saturated with it's own wonderfully unique flavor.

Try deep-frying meat or fish and asian spices in about 2 cups regular vegetable oil and re-use it in all your stir frys. Remember, this oil should be well strained/filtered and refrigerated to not spoil.

Dec 25, 2013
jahogna in Home Cooking