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PontiusPalate's Profile

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Trader Joe's YAY/MEH/NAY - July 2014 [OLD]

Greetings!

Here is a Trader Joe's product that I have just fallen in love with and which rates my biggest YAY since I mentioned their Super Spinach Salad a while back.

Please accept my apologies if this one has been mentioned before.

This product is Trader Joe's Turkish Smyrna Figs.

They are delicious, and I can't eat just one.

PP

about 6 hours ago
PontiusPalate in Chains

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

The Big Crunch,

Sure enough, she only used one side of that jigger.

This was also the case when I went there about two or three weeks ago.

PP

about 11 hours ago
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

JMF,

You wrote:

>>You really shouldn't use the term "weak", that you keep throwing around. The cocktails you had were not "weak" they just were smaller in volume and so had less alcohol. It seems you like a very large martini made with 4-5 oz. of gin, rather than the historical 1.5-2 oz. of gin.<<

Sorry. Apparently, I have developed the habit of equating the strength of a drink with its alcohol content. Therefore, I tend to describe a Martini with 1.5 ounces of gin as "weak" in comparison to one with 3 ounces of gin.

You wrote:

>>Why didn't you ask the bartender how much gin and vermouth they use in their recipe?<<

I admit that I should have.

The reason why I didn't do so last night, and I'm a little embarrassed to admit to this, is that this bartender was georgous, and I was a little intimidated by her beauty.

I didn't want to come across as questioning how she made my Martinis. In addition, she is only 21 years old, and I did not want to make her nervous as well.

By the way, the new bar manager is a male. If I go back when he is tending the bar, I will definitely ask him.

You wrote:

>>As for you guessing the size of the jigger, it may well have been 2 oz. A person who is not familiar with jiggers could easily mistake a 1 oz. / 2 oz/ jigger for a 1.5 oz. / .75 oz. jigger. Most bars making quality cocktails don't use 1.5 oz. measures of gin in a martini.<<

Are you saying that a Martini made with only 1.5 ounces of gin most likely falls short of the standard for a quality cocktail?

PP

about 11 hours ago
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

The Big Crunch,

I get what you are saying above.

But where did you get the idea that I was served a Martini with 2.5 ounces of gin when I clearly watched it being made with only 1 jigger full of gin?

PP

about 11 hours ago
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

The Big Crunch,

You wrote:

>>Also worth noting is that these "weak" cocktails the OP bemoans may only be weak to him.<<

Nope.

If you read my other post in full, you would have read that at least two other people have written and posted negative Yelp reviews on this particular bar, in which their weak and undersized cocktails were specifically mentioned.

I did not write one of these reviews.

Therefore, I am not the only one complaining.

PP

about 12 hours ago
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

The Big Crunch,

I don't drink to see "how buzzed" I get, as you have inferred. If I did, then three Martinis would not be my absolute limit. I would just keep on going until I am unable to stand up.

But when I do drink, I don't mind confessing that I seek to get "just the right buzz", which I describe as a warm and euporic glow. Is that really a bad thing?

As far as driving home, I never drink and drive. Period. I live in a neighborhood where I can walk to any one of 40 bars within a two mile radius of my home.

If I want to eat at a restaurant with a bar that is located outside this limit, then I get a ride. But I never drive.

I only eat out and drink twice a week, which is one evening during the work week and usually on Saturday evening. During the other five nights of the week, I eat at home and drink either bottled water or a container of organic cold-pressed fruit or vegetable juice.

If all I want out of a drink is "flavor", then I would just prefer to stay home and enjoy one of the cold-pressed juices.

By the way, I am also beginning to drink for "flavor" as well. Please read my post describing the cocktail I recently had that was served in a mason jar. It was delicious and full of flavor.

In fact, I am looking forward to having one again in a few days, which will be in place of the second Martini I used to get.

PP

about 12 hours ago
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

JMF,

The following is a recipe which includes both cucumbers and jalapenos in the same cocktail:

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/jalapeno...

At first, I could have sworn I either heard or read that the cocktail I described above contained gin.

I searched the internet high and low for a cocktail recipe which contained gin, cucumbers, and jalapenos. I was not able to find one. Therefore, I did not find a precedent. But I did find the one above with tequila.

As a result, I began to "second guess" myself as to what type of liquor I originally thought was actually in that cocktail.

I will find out for sure and report back after my next visit in a few days from now.

PP

about 12 hours ago
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

The Big Crunch,

I don't think the Martinis I was served at this bar last night contained 2.5 ounces of gin.

Where did you get the idea that they contained 2.5 ounces of gin each?

As I described in my post above, each of my Martinis last night were prepared with only one jigger of gin.

That jigger sure didn't look very large.

It is my guess that it was a 1.5 ounce jigger.

Is there such a thing as a 2.5 ounce jigger?

PP

about 12 hours ago
PontiusPalate in Spirits

When do you send a drink back?

It's overrated.

PP

about 13 hours ago
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

Greetings Again!

In another update, I am pleased to report that I enjoyed one of the specialty cocktails, instead of a second Martini, at one of my favorite bars last week.

I'm a little embarrassed to confess that I do not know all of its ingredients. What I can tell you that it was profoundly delicious.

As a result, I can now appreciate what many of you are talking about when you speak of the "flavor" of a cocktail. This one had it.

This cocktail was served in a mason jar with either tequila or gin or a mixture of both, ice cubes, cucumber slices, jalapeno pepper slices, and some sort of sweetener. It was very refreshing, especially on the hot and humid evening I had it last week.

I will be going back in a few days to have another one and will report back to describe exactly what was in it.

By the way, in addition to its great flavor, it gave me a decent buzz.

PP

about 14 hours ago
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

Greetings!

Last night I went back to the restaurant I have mentioned before, the one whose bar is the only one in my entire neighborhood that uses the jigger method for measuring and making their martinis.

I watched my bartender make my martinis very carefully. She used one jigger of gin, the size of which was larger than the one on its opposite end. I did know its exact size and I did not ask. All I know is that it was not very big. My guess would be one and a half ounces.

She also stirred it instead of shaking it. I counted the length of time she stirred it, which was about 40 seconds.

I have learned that there is a new bar manager here, one whose philosophy is firmly entrenched in the use of jiggers when measuring cocktails, as opposed to the free pour method, and the process of stirring instead of shaking when mixing Martinis. It was only a few short months ago when this same bar was free pouring their cocktails and shaking their Martinis.

Another change I have noted is that the size of their martini glasses has drastically shrunk. Apparently, the new bar manager ordered a new set of Martini glasses, which are much smaller than the ones they used before. In fact, these are the smallest Martini glasses I have ever seen in use in any of the bars in my neighborhood.

The actual taste of my stirred Martinis was fine. I was able to appreciate the immediate visual clarity of my Martinis upon their arrival, instead of having to wait about five minutes for the cloudiness of a shaken Martini to clear up.

But was it worth it? Nope. Not in my book. The two Martinis I ordered were just too weak with respect to their alcohol content. After finishing them, I barely had a buzz.

Why should I go to this particular bar, whose Martinis probably contain only one and a half ounces of gin, when I can go to another bar across the street, and get a Martini with enough gin to last for a 12-second pour count, and get more buzz for my buck?

I might add that the two stirred Martinis I had last night were not very cold. The shaken Martinis I have enjoyed in my neighborhood have been much colder.

Upon further reflection, it isn't the use of the jigger method and the stiring of my Martinis that I am complaining about. It is the substantialy reduced amount of alcohol that is now being used in the cocktails served at this one particular bar. If they were to simply double the amount of gin in my Martinis, with two jiggers instead of one, I think I would feel okay with their Martinis.

At least two other people have already complained about their weak and undersized cocktails in their Yelp reviews. And I was not one of them.

Why is this bar doing this to itself? The word is already out about their weak and undersized cocktails. In such a concentrated and competitive market, with about 40 bars within a two mile radius of my home, and where the spirits flow freely from the free pour method, I don't see how they can stay in business very long if they keep this up.

It's a shame that the only bar in my neighborhood that is using jiggers to measure their alcohol, and stirring their Martinis instead of shaking them, is preparing cocktails and Martinis whose alcohol content is not competitive with those of all of the other bars in my neighborhood.

If the use of jiggers and stirring are truly superior methods, then they certainly deserve a much better showing that that which is currently on display at the one and only bar in my neighborhood that is using them.

PP

about 14 hours ago
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

As an addendum:

I am not accustomed to watching local bartenders use jiggers to measure their drinks.

Consequently, I have never learned to identify the measurement sizes of the different jiggers by sight.

That's why I don't know for sure how large a jigger was used to prepare my Martinis at this one particular bar.

PP

Jul 25, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

Well, how about that!

I have just received an invitation to attend a "Handcrafted Cocktail Dinner" at our local Ruth's Chris Steak House.

http://www.ruthschris.com/promotions/...

However, I am not a fan of Ruth's Chris, and none of the cocktails described inspire me.

PP

Jul 25, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

Hello JMF,

To be honest, I don't know. I didn't ask. Whatever it was, it was not very much. If I had to guess, I would say 1.5 ounces.

I will ask the next time I go. I want to go at least one more time, so that I can write a Yelp review.

Right now they have three stars (out of five) going in, with all things considered, including the food.

PP

Jul 25, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

Hello zin1953,

To answer your question, I guess I consider the 12-count Martini to be the lesser of two evils.

It wasn't too strong to me taste wise, but it did prove to be too strong with respect to how I felt the next morning after drinking two of them and then a Manhattan afterwards.

Next time I am going to exercise some restraint and skip the Manhattan.

You wrote:

>>So, sure, if you are walking to the bar to get buzzed, that 12-count Martini is the best deal in town! But if you're walking to the bar because you want a great cocktail, that ain't it.<<

I agree. I also agree with what you have said about the importance of "balance."

Unfortunately, it doesn't look like there are any really great cocktails being prepared in any of my neighborhood bars, at least not by the standards that you and others go by.

But I will keep looking.

In the meantime, if given a choice between a Martini prepared with one jigger of gin, and a 12-count Martini as I described, both for the same price, the 12-count Martini wins hands down.

PP

Jul 25, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

The Big Crunch,

I hear and understand what you are saying.

It just so happens that the vast majority of the bars in my neighborhood are high volume operations, where the free pour rules, and with the type of atmosphere and climate you have described above.

The Martinis I recently had at that one and only bar in my neighborhood, where the jigger method was used, were the weakest (with respect to alcohol content) I have had in years.

This is what soured me on the jigger method, at least in the manner it was used at this particular bar. Why go there when I can get that 12-count pour Martini at another bar only a five minute walk away, and at the same price?

I really do wish there was a bar in my neighborhood which specialized in the type of complex cocktails that you and others have described.

PP

Jul 25, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

Hello zin1953,

Many thanks for your comments above. I have no arguments to put forth against them.

It appears that I happen to live in an area in which the type and quality of the complex cocktails that you and others have spoken of are not available.

If that cocktail menu I posted is as bad as you all say it is, which is still the best one I have seen in this area, then I am probably better off drinking those stiff Martinis as long as I am living here.

I didn't realize that there was so much artistry and complexity to the actual taste of various cocktails.

Trust me when I say that if you or JMF ran a bar in my neighborhood, I would become one of your regulars.

By the way, I went to a bar a few nights ago where the bartender fixed me a Hendricks Gin Martini with a 12-count pour. I saw it with my very own eyes and counted.

This one was TOO strong. This must have been one of those bars where I gave a very generous tip before.

I don't think I can handle too many more of these in my advancing old age. This is all the more reason to seek out and gravitate to the type of cocktails you have mentioned.

PP

Jul 25, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Trader Joe's YAY/MEH/NAY - July 2014 [OLD]

My favorite Trader Joe's snack is Trader Joe's Pumpernickel Pretzel Rods. I usually buy one bag a week.

Jul 25, 2014
PontiusPalate in Chains

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

Hello geneO,

Right on!

That's exactly how I feel.

I also enjoy the watching the artistry of a bartender free pouring a number of drinks in rapid succession.

Watching a bartender use the jigger method with so much exactitude makes me feel like I am in a chemistry lab.

On the other hand, I am willing to give some of these precisely measured cocktails a try.

PP

Jul 22, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

Hello budnball,

It sounds like you lived in an apartment behind Maury High School, which is off Colonial Avenue.

You will be interested to learn that the Naro is still there and going strong, showing lots of independent films. Most of the street musicians in Ghent play right in front of the Naro.

I'm trying to think of the names of some of the restaurants that were in Ghent from 1980 to 1982.

There was Cogan's on Colonial Avenue, which is still there. On Colley Avenue, which is also where the Naro is located, I believe there was Elliott's and also the Intermission, whose spaces now house entirely different restaurants.

Dan's Hideway is another one that comes to mind. Maybe Kelly's Tavern. Maybe the Do Nut Dinette.

Further down Colley Avenue, the Red Mule Inn was a popular spot for listening to folk music around that time.

Either the Potpourri or Master's was located at the intersection of Colley Avenue and Princess Anne Road.

Maybe Charlie's Cafe, located on Granby Street behind Maury High School. It's still there.

Do any of those names ring a bell?

PP

Jul 22, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

Hello budnball,

I can't think of or picture any public clay tennis courts located actually within the bounaries of what is now designated as the Ghent area. However, I believe the ones located across Old Dominion University are still there.

If you are familiar with the Ghent area, then you probably remember Colley Avenue. I live right off Colley Avenue. Walking along Colley Avenue in the evening can be a beautiful and festive experience, highlighted by the sight of beautiful historic old buildings and the street musicians who are playing outside.

It is here where most of our neighborhood restaurants and bars are located, with most of the others located on or about 21st Street.

Ghent does not seem to have any "old school Barkeeps." At least, I can't think of one. Most of our local bartenders are under 30 years of age. One of them just turned 21 a couple of months ago and is majoring in fashion merchandising from Old Dominion University.

If I have to live in Norfolk, I wouldn't live anywhere else. It is probably the only section of Norfolk where I feel safe walking at night.

Jul 22, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

Hello collardman,

Whenever I go there, I always start off with their Yaki-Soba Noodles under their Level I menu. I usually get some shrimp added to it for an extra $2 and pair this appetizer with my first Martini.

For my entree, I usually get a fresh seafood special if they have one. If not, my "default" dish is their Wagyu Beef Carpaccio from their Level II menu, paired with their Wasabi Mashed Potatoes from their Level III menu. It is here is where I enjoy my second Martini.

If I order a dessert from their Level IV menu, I usually get their Creme Brulee Duet, the flavors of which can change from day to day. When I get this, I always pair it with a Bardohattan.

For those who are curious, here is their food menu:

http://bardoeats.com/pdf/Bardo_menu_S...

With respect to the food only, this is my second most favorite restaurant in the Ghent Norfolk area.

PP

Jul 22, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

Greetings To The Big Crunch:

Do you live and work in the DC area?

If so, then you know that you are not too far away from Norfolk.

How much would you charge the owner of this restaurant to hire you as their bar consultant and completely revamp their cocktail operation? This would include coming to Norfolk and retraining their bartenders as well.

The owner also owns three other restaurants in the area with one more opening in a few weeks. It wouldn't surprise me if he met your price.

Then again, most people in this area probably wouldn't notice the difference with the changes you made. Most of us are simply not accustomed to fine cocktails prepared with the level of quality you describe.

PP

Jul 22, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

Hello zin1953,

That wouldn't work for me, as I no longer like beer.

Bartenders are constantly asking me to taste this craft beer, that craft beer, etc., and I do so to oblige them, But none of them taste good to me. They all leave a bad taste in my mouth.

PP

Jul 22, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

JMF,

Wow.

And to think that this is the only bar in my entire neighborhood in the Ghent section of Norfolk that emphasizes spirits over beer and wine.

The only cocktail I have tried from this menu is their Bardohattan, which I often pair with dessert when the mood strikes.

Just curious. How would you improve upon their Bardohattan?

In regard to their Vinoraga, which contains Bombay Sapphire East, I was the one who first suggested that they start stocking this particular brand of gin a year ago. However, I will admit that I don't like the sound of the red wine syrup that is included in this particular drink.

When it comes to specialty cocktails in my neighborhood, this is really the best we have to offer.

PP

Jul 22, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

JMF,

Thanks for the warning.

I can remember "Chocolate Martinis" becoming very popular in my area back in the 1990s.

That is one thing that I would never order. The very thought of it makes me nauseous.

PP

Jul 22, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

The Big Crunch,

The following is a link to the cocktail menu of one of my top two favorite bars and restaurants in my neighborhood:

http://bardoeats.com/pdf/BardoDrinkMe...

You will notice that they do stock orange bitters, as shown by its presence in their "Bardohattan."

This is the bar in my neighborhood that I deem most likely to be capable of being able to prepare your "perfect Martini", if only I can get there at the right time, when their bar manager is on duty and when they are not being slammed with customers.

PP

Jul 22, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

Greetings To The Big Crunch:

Many thanks for your latest commentary above, including your recipe for your "perfect Martini." I have jotted it down on an a piece of paper and stored it in my wallet. Hopefully, I will be able to present it to a local bartender soon and at an opportune time when he or she is not too busy.

Some of our local bars do stock Boodles, which is one of the gins you mentioned. Sometimes this brand is suggested to me if they have run out of Hendricks. When this happens, I usually ask for Bombay Sapphire.

The first brand of gin I ever tasted was Burnett's, which was my father's favorite brand. The first brand I started to buy on my own on a regular basis was Tanqueray, which I drank for many years. After that, I switched to Bombay Sapphire and drank that for many years.

It was only last year when I switched to Hendrick's. I find it smoother and more satisfying than either Bombay Sapphire or Hendrick;s. I can no longer tolerate Burnett's.

I will confess that I do tend to judge a Martini primarily on its ability to give me a buzz, with its taste being secondary. I don't expect a buzz after the first one, but I do expect one by the end of the second one. It is my sense that your "perfect Martini" would accomplish that nicely.

At that bar I complained about, where the bartender prepared each of my Martinis with the jigger method, he did only use one jigger full of gin and a small amount of vermouth. I am accustomed to a higher volume of gin in my Martinis than that.

By the way, this bar was also out of cucumbers when I ordered my Hendricks Gin martini at this bar. The bartender offered to make it with a small amout of St. Germaine Elderflower liqueur instead. I enjoyed the taste of it, but three of them simply did not give me the buzz that I usually get from two Martinis elsewhere, prepared with the free pour method.

The Ghent section of Norfolk has a unique overall demographic, consisting mostly of the young hipster crowd, students from Old Dominion University, and sailors. Beer is the most popular beverage, and the craft beer movement is very popular here. I am in the minority, both in my age and my preference for Martinis over beer and wine.

I've been doing a little bit of online reading on Martinis. I got a big kick out of the following article. I especially like their idea of only using a cap full of vermouth.

http://www.artofmanliness.com/2009/05...

And also this one, which describes how Robert DeNiro likes his Martinis with those ice shards coming out on top as a result of extra shaking.

http://www.grubstreet.com/2013/09/slo...

After reading these articles, I realized that none of the bars in my neighborhood have Martinis glasses that are already chilled. Instead, they are usually stacked on their glass shelves or hanging upside down from one of those glass racks. This confirms for me that there really is no true Martini bar in my Ghent Norfolk neighborhood.
However, there is a Martini bar opening soon in Virginia Beach.

I may ultimately have to go to downtown Norfolk or to that Martini bar in Virginia Beach in order to get your "perfect Martini" or a close approximation to it.

Thanks again for your commentary.

PP

Jul 22, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

Greetings To The Big Crunch:

I will try to respond to your points and answer your questions below:

1. Yes, It is my rule to walk to a bar whenever I want a Martini. My number one reason for this is that I live alone and do not like to drink alone. I simply do not enjoy it. Therefore, I do not have the motivation to buy the bar equipment needed to make my own Martinis at home.

Instead, I would rather walk to a local bar, where I can enjoy the companionship of my regular bar friends and occasionally talk to and make a few new friends and acquaintences.

Second of all, I always feel invigorated after walking back from one of my neighborhood bars, especially one that is located about 1.5 miles away from my home. It is my estimation that I burn off approximately 320 calories during the round trip, which I am guessing is roughly equivalent of at least one and a half of the two or three Martinis I usually drink there on a given evening.

Finally, I love the peace of mind that comes from knowing that, by walking to and from one of my favorite neighborhood bars, I will never have to worry about getting a DUI.

2. I never said that I like to "get drunk" on cold Hendricks Gin. Getting drunk usually gives me a headache and a general feeling of malaise all throughout the next day. This is something that has happened to me on the few occasions when I have had four or more Martinis.

This is why three is my limit. But I won't lie -- I do enjoy the buzz. I do know that I am legally over our state BAC limit of 0.08 after two Martinis, which is another reason why I choose to walk for my Martinis. For the same question you repeated again, please see #1 above.

3. I am not looking for a "cheap way to get drunk on clear liquor." If I did, I would order the cheapest gin in the entire bar. My father's favorite brand was Burnett's. If they carried that, I would order it.

I do not like to "shoot" any kind of liquor, and I don't usually drink vodka.

Nor am I looking for a "quick" buzz. I like to sip my Martinis slowly, and let my "buzz" gradually climb to a rising crescendo and climax. I usually take about 20 to 30 minutes to drink my first Martini as I waiting for and eating whatever appetizer I have ordered. I usually take twice as long to drink my second one, as I am slowly savoring each bite of my entree.

Sometimes I will order a third Martini, or a Manhattan, if I am in the mood for dessert. Sometimes the floor manager buys me one. On the average, the length of time I usually spend at the bar of one of my favorite restaurants is about an hour-and-a-half. By the way, I always eat at the bar.

4 -- In my particular neighborhood, with about 40 restaurants with full liquor licenses within a 2 mile radius, the free pour method rules. Many of our local bars only have one bartender on duty, who usually has a full load of 20 or more customers sitting at the bar, and who is also dealing with the drink orders from the other diners who are sitting down at their tables.

The free pour method takes a lot less time than the jigger measurement method. I don't have the heart to request that a bartender use the jigger method when he or she is being slammed with so many customers at the same time.

My one recent experience with a locar bar which did use the jigger method was unsatisfactory. Three of their Martinis hardly gave me a buzz. This bartender only used one jigger full of gin for each of my Martinis.

In contrast, the bar right across the street from this one uses the free pour method. There I usually have a nice buzz by the middle of my second Martini.

Why should I pay the same amout of money for three weak Martinis prepared with the jigger method, which barely give me a buzz, as for the Martinis prepared by the other bar and which give me a decent buzz before I finish my second one?

I do wish that our area was a little more sophisticated about Martinis. The typical bartender in my neighborhood is a young and pretty 20-something who probably doesn't even know what orange bitters are. One of them just turned 21 only a couple of months ago.

One of my favorite local bars is an exception. Orange bitters are always in stock, and they are usually used in their house Manhattan.

The next time I go there on a slow night, if the bar manager is present, I am going to ask her to make me a "classic" Martini, stirred instead of shaken, and with the orange bitters. I had planned to do this one night last week, but one of the young assistant bartenders was on duty, and she was slammed with customers.

Please rest assured that I am keeping an open mind about trying a classic Martini, stirred and not shaken, with orange bitters. I just have to find the right bar at the right moment. I might even have to venture over to one of the high end restaurants in downtown Norfolk in order to do so. This would mean taking a taxi to do so, but I would be willing to do exactly that, in order to satisfy my curiousity, and to hopefully raise my Martini appreciation to the next level.

PP

Jul 21, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits

Free Pour Vs. Jigger Method

Speaking of rum, have you ever had Ma Doudou Rhum?

http://www.rhummadoudou.com/shop/info...

My favorite restaurant and bar got some in a few months ago and I tried it.

I am not really much of a rum person, but I enjoyed this one.

PP

Jul 18, 2014
PontiusPalate in Spirits