t

theannerska's Profile

Title Last Reply

QUICK HELP! My Pot o Chili's TOO HOT!!

Sorry if this is too late, but I had the same problem recently -- I put in the whole 8-oz. can! I ended up adding about 3 cups of grated cheese, tossed with a bit of flour, which took away most of the kick and helped correct the texture as well (I like my chili very thick). This was for a 7-quart recipe. I imagine sour cream (or plain yogurt?) would also help.

A friend recently added too many Jamaican hot peppers to her batch of chili and 'fixed' it by adding brown sugar.

However, note that all of these methods definitely do not keep the 'integrity' of the recipe -- but, in my case at least, I preferred the revised version!

Nov 01, 2009
theannerska in Home Cooking

Lunch or Brunch for a visit to Target in Atlantic Terminal-not in the mall

Another vote for Taro Sushi. Very fresh, the staff is friendly and helpful, and yes, very well-priced. I think they have a great lunch special, too...

-----
Taro Sushi
244 Flatbush Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11217

Nov 01, 2009
theannerska in Outer Boroughs

Impression ( making a )in a depression

If you've got a deep pot, there's always congee/jook, sort of a rice porridge that every Chinese kid grows up with. You can add anything you want to the base -- meat, veg, seafood, etc.; my favorite as a kid was clams and chicken. DIY garnishes (similar to waffle toppings, everyone can choose their own): peanuts, scallions, julienned ginger are pretty basic, and you could provide some creative alternatives.

The only reason I'm hesitant to recommend this is that congee -- the base, at least -- is a bit plain, so it might not be as impressive as you'd like...

Oct 24, 2009
theannerska in Home Cooking

Easiest recipe you cook and love

I'm prone to a fried egg, or two, on top of steamed white rice -- a tiny splash of soy, sometimes a squirt of Sriracha, and I've got breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Of course, it helps that I'm only cooking for one...

Oct 21, 2009
theannerska in Home Cooking

How long can I keep homemade aioli?

Hello all,

I finally made my first batch of mayo from scratch, by hand -- and, as someone who absolutely can't stand store-bought mayo, it really is worth it. But since I cook for one and have about a pint of it left, how much longer can I keep it for? The general consensus seems to be about a week for homemade mayo, but does this change if I've mixed in garlic?

(Ingredients: egg yolks; olive oil; salt; mustard; lemon juice; garlic.)

Thanks in advance!

Oct 11, 2009
theannerska in Home Cooking

Oh glorious day! Oh wonderful year! Oh lucky me! I finally, finally, finally get to host Thanksgiving. I banish thee jarred gravy (tell me about your single favorite dish)

Forgot a few things -- traumatic amnesia...we also had elote (with crumbled cotija, homemade mayo, cayenne, and lime), sweet potato fries with homemade aioli, and chorizo stuffing. And, while guests were filtering in, some (much-needed) margaritas, goodhealthgourmet's black bean dip, and Tostitos lime chips -- by that point, I really wasn't up for making those from scratch.

Oct 11, 2009
theannerska in Home Cooking

Oh glorious day! Oh wonderful year! Oh lucky me! I finally, finally, finally get to host Thanksgiving. I banish thee jarred gravy (tell me about your single favorite dish)

JungMann, our experiences sound similar. I also initiated the coup at 12, the same year I started cooking basics, and have done the meal every year since then. Since my family still eats Cantonese homecooking nearly every day of the year, and (fortunately) are very adventurous eaters, I'm given a lot of room to do whatever I want. Last year it was turkey with a chili lime glaze, giblet gravy, orange cranberry relish, jalapeno cornbread, green beans sauteed with dried shrimp and ginger (the green bean casserole, which I'd had at my classmates' houses and adored, was vetoed the first time I made it), roasted garlic mashed potatoes, avocado salad with cilantro and lime, and chicken corn chowder. Pumpkin flan for dessert.

A bonus of serving exotic/foreign foods, I've found, is that they're received with very few expectations -- little to no pressure!

Oct 11, 2009
theannerska in Home Cooking

Falafel

I've always been an Azuri Cafe fan -- my favorite falafel and shawarma in the city. I've been going for about seven or eight years now. The falafel is always perfectly fried and greaseless; the sandwich has the right quantity of each component so that you don't have stuff squirting out the sides while you're only halfway through; the hummus is great and I usually get some to go, even though I mostly make my own otherwise.

I don't usually note your latter categories -- I'm not picky about ambience if I'm getting a consistently great falafel sandwich (or any other food, for that matter). Azuri's got a longstanding reputation for being a bit of a grouch, but he's always been nice to me, and there are always imported Israeli juices/sodas in the cooler. He closes early on Friday and all day Saturday for Shabbat, it's a small space that gets crowded at lunchtime, and the location is a bit out of the way (near 10th Ave). But It's always worth it.

Oct 09, 2009
theannerska in Manhattan

Halal Cart at 53rd and 6th - worth the wait?

KTinNYC (and Midtown Lunch) is right; I worked in the area over the summer and ordered from the 7th Ave. outpost at least once a week -- SW corner of 53rd and 7th.

Oct 09, 2009
theannerska in Manhattan

First Timer --Korean BBQ.. suggestions?

Not to hijack -- but, as a Korean food novice, I've read that Korean restaurants tend to specialize in one or two dishes/types of dishes. What is Kun Jip's specialty, if any? I've had several meals there with large groups, but none of the food was particularly memorable.

Oct 09, 2009
theannerska in Manhattan

sexiest restaurant in manhattan?

Yes -- I'll have what she's having!

Oct 09, 2009
theannerska in Manhattan

30 Last days in NYC, what restaurants to hit

I've been to Hong Kong many times -- tons of family still over there. I always miss these most:

- Katz's pastrami on rye with mustard and full sours.
- Ess-A for a hot bagel, not toasted, with tofu scallion spread (far creamier than the cream cheese).
- Russ & Daughters' herring in cream sauce, pastrami and Scottish salmons, horseradish cream cheese.
- Gray's recession special with sauerkraut, mustard, and a banana drink.

- Grand Central Oyster Bar (at the bar only) and Lure Fishbar's happy hour -- both excellent for oysters and amazing atmosphere, but in different ways. If I didn't spend each trip visiting relatives, I'd have gone to Japan by now -- I have constant sashimi/sushi cravings (Sushi Yasuda, Taro Sushi in Flatbush).

- The burger at Luger's, with a side of bacon and a bowl of schlag for dessert. steakrules is on the money re: Rare's burger. I went to high school somewhat close to Ottomanelli's, so I'm very partial to their burger and fries. Unfortunately, have yet to try Shake Shack... But, I'd strongly recommend getting at least one good burger in before you leave; I'm by no means well-traveled, but I've yet to have a truly satisfying, juicy, messy burger outside of the US.

- Falafel and shawarma from Azuri Café, with one of the imported Israeli juices/sodas from the cooler.

- Besides the chicken and rice at 53rd and 6th, I'd hit Kwik Meal for the lamb over rice -- with a good dose of their nuclear-strength green hot sauce.

- Mexican/Latino specialties at the Red Hook Ballfields -- pupusas, huaraches, ceviche. I love rice and beans and arroz con gandules (rice with pigeon peas, I think), but I've been making those at home for several years now. I do remember having great rice and beans at El Malecon, though.

- I'm not familiar with the tapas scene there, but I think Simon's right re: lack of rustic traditional places. I've not been to Tia Pol, but had great meals at Boqueria and Casa Mono; La Nacional remains my favorite for traditional tapas.

- As far as 'American' food, I had an incredible meal and experience at Eleven Madison Park, which I think is 'New American' -- but I would miss Southern food more, I think. The fried chicken and biscuits are delicious at the Redhead, and I enjoyed the brisket at Hill Country. I'd also look into a good place for ribs.

- Finally, I don't have much of a sweet tooth and am unfamiliar with the dessert scene in Hong Kong...but it seems that pie is a fairly American item, so you might want to look into that before leaving. I like the tarts and pies at Two Little Red Hens in the city (Ladybird Bakery's their branch in Park Slope), Steve's key lime pies in Red Hook, and the sour cream apple pie from NY Little Pie Co. Two Little Red Hens also makes a great, somewhat underrated gingerbread.

Congrats on the job, happy fooding, and safe travels!

Oct 09, 2009
theannerska in Manhattan

Dinner near 56th & 7th

For what it's worth, Azuri is still on his game -- I worked down the block this summer and was there about once a week. If you do end up going, don't forget that he closes early on Friday and all day Saturday for Shabbat.

Oct 05, 2009
theannerska in Manhattan

Momofuku Ssam last night (very long review)

As I'm on a grad student budget, I don't get to post often -- but love reading the boards and anticipating where I'll go when I do splurge. I was a lucky invitee to my SO's parents' 25th anniversary celebration dinner at EMP and the food (and service) certainly met my expectations from reading RGR's glowing reviews. Our table of 10 was able to select either the spring tasting menu or the suckling pig tasting. I chose the latter and it was amazing, the portions certainly aren't large but I remember it feeling substantial as the meal went on -- maybe because of the richness, or the wine pairings we had. I could probably put away a 32 oz ribeye and left EMP feeling pretty full, especially after the mignardises, some cheeses, and a few Scotches...

Unfortunately, I can't help you on the specific courses, and it's been a while -- I think maybe the third or fourth was described as the 'signature' suckling pig dish. Chef Humm did come out toward the end of our meal and asked specifically about the pig tasting, saying that the menu was likely to change. So, steakrules, if and when you go, please report back! I look forward to eating vicariously through your review. :)

Jul 12, 2009
theannerska in Manhattan

Cook once, eat for a week ideas...

Leftovers are also great for a roasted veg puree (easy side for a protein) or soup (thin slightly with broth/stock).

Mar 20, 2009
theannerska in Home Cooking

Poaching Chicken - any tips?

I was trying to imitate my mother's method (similar to Bigley9's 'asian preparation'), so today I put all the breasts into a big pot, covered with water, and simmered away. 10 minutes plus an hour off the heat, covered. Too bad I missed NYchowcook's comment below; I think I did a full simmer, since the meat ended up a bit on the dry side.

I've got another family pack thawing in the fridge and will experiment some more tomorrow, this time on a much lower simmer. And next time, bone-in. Thanks for all the suggestions!

Mar 10, 2009
theannerska in Home Cooking

Poaching Chicken - any tips?

I am pretty embarrassed to admit this, but I've never poached chicken -- and just picked up a family-pack of boneless skinless breasts on sale. Would love to poach them for use in lunches and dinners all week. Is it a bad idea to just throw them all in a big pot and let simmer? Or should I simmer them in a single layer, maybe in a large skillet? Thanks in advance.

Mar 09, 2009
theannerska in Home Cooking

How Do You Make Garlic Bread?

Barefoot Contessa has a killer garlic bread recipe that uses a lot of the techniques mentioned here -- especially the parsley and ATK ideas. Basically, one side of the loaf gets a mix of parsley, oregano, and garlic heated briefly in oil; the other side gets butter (if I'm remembering correctly -- haven't made it in a while). The whole thing is wrapped in foil, baked for five? minutes, then baked another five with the foil opened up. No 'bite' in the garlic at all.

I like the roasted garlic idea as well; I've been simply making a paste from the garlic with a little salt, smearing it on a baguette, and going to town. Never occurred to me to throw in some butter et voila, garlic bread.

Also, Ina uses ciabatta in her recipe, which I like -- the perfect combination of crusty outside + soft, chewy interior.

Mar 08, 2009
theannerska in Home Cooking

The 'tipping point' or how many times did you learn to cook?

My 'tipping points' tend to be when I get curious about new cuisines -- through people I meet, places I go, foods I've tried or want to try. I'm a newbie cook, but here are mine so far:

- Learning how to make pasta when I was 10, since mom would put the pasta in a pot of (cold) water, turn on the stove, and boil away until she remembered to check on it (at least 30 minutes later). Am now the designated pasta maker.

- Declaring microwaved Bagel Bites too chewy, and opting for the toaster oven instead -- simple things amazed us in college...

- Since Italian was the most easily accepted in my house, it was the first non-Chinese food I learned to cook. In the beginning, it was fake Italian -- basically making clean-out-the-fridge fried rice, but subbing in pasta for the rice. I've since learned a few real Italian dishes, but the bar is set pretty low at home. My parents still love Sbarro and Olive Garden.

- Jewish cooking from an old boyfriend's non-Jewish dad (he made latkes better than the (Jewish) mom).

- Spanish cooking from my host mom in Madrid, who had never hosted a Chinese student before and wanted all the recipes -- we did a lot of trading. I'd spend nearly every afternoon during the week in the kitchen with her, 'helping' (learning to) prep a proper Spanish lunch.

- While in Spain, I traveled to Morocco with an ex-Peace Corps grad student and met his old host family. The women of the family taught me how to roll couscous by hand -- none of that boxed quick-cooking nonsense. Since women are traditionally sequestered to kitchen/house duties there, I spent most of my time in the kitchen with them -- endless amounts of couscous, hot and cold salads, tagines, and a really great 'pancake' they would make for breakfast (but thicker, denser, and more savory -- but, not quite like an arepa).

- A slight foray into Korean food, when I had a particularly strong craving for those tofu casserole-like soups and the spicy cucumber pickles I had as banchan once. No idea what these are actually called -- sorry.

- My first friend in college was Bosnian; her mom gave me the recipes I always asked for -- burek, sarma, ajvar -- and her dad would ship us 'care packages' consisting solely of his homemade suho meso.

- After many years of campaigning for a 'real American Thanksgiving meal,' mom acquiesced -- and designated me as the one who would have to cook the entire meal. First time I ever attempted gravy, stuffing, cranberry sauce, that weird sweet potato/marshmallow combination, pie...and, the first time I ever roasted anything in the oven.

- The SO is half Puerto Rican, so I've really gotten into Puerto Rican cooking -- also does wonders for the grad student budget -- but he works in sports admin (football ops) and went to school in the South. So, lots of sports-watching food (dips, guac, chile con queso, wings) and, finally, all the Americana-type food I grew up without! Mac 'n cheese, coleslaw, country fried steak, biscuits and gravy, mashed potatoes, creamed spinach, and so on. My arteries will never be the same.

Mar 02, 2009
theannerska in Home Cooking

What do Chowhounds do for a living (besides eat of course)? [old]

Now that I'm a first-year law student writing a brief two nights before deadline, I'm reading this thread again and...I've never wanted more to be in culinary school. I've never been a line cook, but at this point, I'm pretty sure it can't be much worse. At least law school hasn't entirely stopped my chowing habits -- though now, I cook about once a week and freeze most of it for lunches. If anything, it's forced me to be a bit more creative and taught me a few things about freezer-friendly ingredients.

And, of course, the first thing I did when I sent in my tuition deposit was check the boards for local eats.

Feb 14, 2009
theannerska in Not About Food

What is your favorite "ethnic" food to make?

Haha, my mom has been trying to perfect her ma po tofu for years -- she considers non-Cantonese Chinese a huge challenge. I third the request for your rendition!

Feb 14, 2009
theannerska in Home Cooking

What is your favorite "ethnic" food to make?

American has the most foreign-ethnic connotations for me -- I grew up eating Cantonese homecooking every day, while watching my friends bring Lunchables to school and my college roommates heat up frozen dinners. Since I lean more toward other ethnic cuisines when I cook (mostly Italian, Puerto Rican, and Spanish), American food still holds a lot of mystique and it seems it's becoming a bit of an Achilles heel. I remember a particularly bad rendition of country fried steak recently...the biscuits and gravy were a bit of a disaster, too. But I may have asked for it -- frying is still relatively new to me, I've only made gravy once, and I'm afraid of ovens. Catastrophe much?

To answer the question, though, I'd have to go with arroz con gandules. The SO is half Puerto Rican, so I'd eaten this glorious dish for years before realizing it'd be possible to cook it myself. Learning how to do it did me a few other favors -- now I make my own sofrito and achiote oil -- and there's nothing quite like pulling out a container of arroz con gandules from the freezer on a cold day...

Feb 13, 2009
theannerska in Home Cooking

Record Breaking Cold- What's The Best Food?

I'd love to try that white chili -- how big is that can of crushed tomatoes? And, what's 'all-purpose seasoning' -- is that similar to seasoned salt?

Jan 24, 2009
theannerska in Home Cooking

Dining Level at Grand Central

Stop by Little Pie Company for some sour cream walnut apple pie. They've got ice cream too, if you're looking to gild the lily.

Jan 24, 2009
theannerska in Manhattan

Looking for the best street vendor falafel near the London NYC

Another vote for Azuri -- great schwarma too.

Jan 22, 2009
theannerska in Manhattan

What is the most unusual, but tasty, sandwich you make or have made?

Right now I can't stop eating this: egg whites and good old processed cheese, wrapped up in a warm flour tortilla. But usually, when I'm looking for new sandwich ideas, I throw in substitutions for the lettuce/tomato/mayo-mustard combo. This could be broccoli rabe, spinach, pickled cucumber slices, sundried tomatoes, roasted red peppers, vinaigrettes, ...

Will Owen's post actually reminded me of a sandwich I loved in Spain -- a thick wedge of tortilla inside a crusty loaf of bread (sometimes with a slice of tomato, if you want). Good hot, warm, or cold, but definitely not healthy enough for everyday consumption (in its most traditional form, it's fried sliced potatoes mixed into a flat/deep-dish omelet). Still, it's incredibly versatile -- you can always add other ingredients to the mix and try subbing in egg whites.

Jan 10, 2009
theannerska in Home Cooking

Top-5 Cooking Goals for 2009

Mine are relatively simple, but I would love to accomplish:

- Like some others above, losing some more weight while eating extremely well

- Overcoming my ridiculous fear of ovens -- whether with big roasts or baking

- Break in my brand new All-Clad sauté pan (got it for Christmas!) and get a good cast-iron pan...and maybe a good Dutch oven, too.

- Experiment with different dishes and cuisines, in order to get the SO to like eggplant, mushrooms, and seafood

- Learn more family recipes

Dec 26, 2008
theannerska in Home Cooking

Planned Leftovers-for work lunches

Just roasted a tenderloin for Christmas and have been making incredibly delicious sandwiches -- highly recommended. Great with the remainder of the creamed spinach on ciabatta and whole-grain mustard. Still trying to figure out how to reheat mashed potatoes though; if I succeed they're going right in the sandwich.

Dec 26, 2008
theannerska in Home Cooking

Beef Tenderloin disaster

Sorry to hear -- I did a tenderloin for the first time ever this Christmas and it turned out pretty well, I think. I followed the Pioneer Woman's recipe (http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/20...) with some adjustments, since I was cooking in the boyfriend's kitchen and had to improvise a bit. First, no cast iron pan, or any pan big enough to sear that big a chunk of meat, so I said a prayer and skipped the searing. (I have an inexplicable fear of ovens, since we never used ovens in my house when I was growing up, so I'm always terrified with these sorts of things...) No thermometer, either. Another prayer was said.

Put it in at 475 and took it out after 20 minutes, let it rest for another 10, and cut into it. A bit too rare, so it went in for another 10, out and rested for another 10, and that was it. Ended up on the rarer side of medium rare, was fully edible, no one died, and nothing blew up!

A happy holiday to all.

(Edit: the tenderloin was about 3.5 pounds.)

Dec 26, 2008
theannerska in Home Cooking

Burger Battle: Shake Shack vs Resto

I've only had the burger at PJ Clarke's, but I much prefer it to Resto's. I, too, just tried it a few days ago. Maybe my expectations were too high, or it was overhyped, but it seemed like a pretty plain burger to me...and a bit overcooked for my taste, as well. My friend and I shared the parsley and garlic(?) mussels to start, and I'm happy to report those were great. Frites perfectly crispy; lemon paprika sauce very delicious; great beer list. But the burger -- well, next time I'll know to try something else.

Dec 26, 2008
theannerska in Manhattan