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CHOW Reviews: W├╝sthof Classic 7 Pc. Knife Block #7417

We received a number of Wusthof classic knives as wedding presents in 1990, we use them every day and they are absolutely top-notch. Our "originals" are an 8" chef's knife, a 6" boning knife, a 3.5" paring knife, and an 8" carving knife. We have added an 8" bread knife, a 10" slicer, and a 5" utility knife, which is seldom used. And also a 8" Wusthof santuku, which is our favorite for slicing salads and other veggies, and a 5" tomato serrated knife from Victorinox. We use a steel for touch-ups, and a ceramic rod for sharpening. This is a high quality product that will last a very long time.

Jul 16, 2013
gmkjr49 in Cookware

What cookware item do you want now?

Be careful when you handle that sterling silver skillet. Silver is a very efficient conductor of heat, so be careful when you grab the handle. That is why silver teapots always have either wood handles, or wood or ivory insulators between the pot and the handle.

Jun 11, 2013
gmkjr49 in Cookware

What cookware item do you want now?

We have a fantastic and very simple knife sharpener. It has two white ceramic rods* about 5/16" in diameter and 6" long that fit into a pair of angled holes drilled into a wooden base. The base is drilled to hold the rods at the correct angle to sharpen a european-style knife. To sharpen the blade, you hold the knife square to the surface below the base, and run the blade down the rods alternately until the knife is sharp. Then use your steel to straighten & polish the edge, and you're done. We also use a Wustof hand sharpener for occasional touchups, but the angled rods really do the trick when our knives get dull. The rods are pretty smooth, and similar in texture to the raised un-glazed base 'rim' of a porcelain plate, which will also work in a pinch.

Here's a link: http://www.knifecenter.com/item/LSLCS...

Our's doesn't have the plexiglass protector.

* Evidently, the rods are "alumina-ceramic."

Jun 11, 2013
gmkjr49 in Cookware

Clad Cookware Construction Cuestion

Glad to hear Calphalon has addressed your problem. At home, we have All-Clad LTD, which is SS inside with a hard-anodized dark gray exterior. After about 20 years, the anodizing on our most popular pan is giving out in pin-head sized areas, evidently from the pilot light on our old stove. Otherwise, its in great condition.

I noticed a bit of surface corrosion on the top edge of that pan several years ago, probably as a result of bi-metal corrosion from leaving it in the sink overnight with the SS lid on, or SS flatware in it. I took the smallest piece of brillo possible, and used it to polish the exposed rim. making sure to avoid scratching the anodized surface in the process. Worked well, and this is still our favorite pan. The SS interior surface can get a bit stained from cooking certain foods, one of our favorites is rice, which leaves a pattern on the SS interior of the pan. I use a water-based paste copper cleaner (Wright's) to get rid of this and keep the whole pan and lid shining and looking pretty much like new.

Jun 10, 2013
gmkjr49 in Cookware

Are Calphalon Pans Really Worth It?

Try "refreshing" the non-stick coating with a light coat of cooking oil and then put the pan in the oven for a while (30 min) at moderate temperature. Clean with regular dish soap, rather than in the dishwasher. Dishwasher soap has harsh alkaline compounds that can burn the anodized exterior coating, and the heat and water aren't good for the bi-metal parts, meaning the places the SS handle and rivets are joined to the aluminum body of the pan. I've had great luck with Tefal pans, but the non-stick coating doesn't last forever.

Jun 10, 2013
gmkjr49 in Cookware

Cleaning Waffle Irons

I would try the full-on seasoning process used for iron and steel cookware; use a pastry brush to apply a light coating of oil and put the grids in the oven at 425 degrees for an hour or so, allow to cool, re-oil and re-season. Of course, you could use the waffle iron for this, but I think the oven might be easier for the long haul. Plus, it has a timer so you won't forget. Even though our older WI is well seasoned, I usually re-oil before each use, as a safety precaution. (Quote of the day as I was scraping out the stuck waffle after disregarding a reminder, "What were you thinking.")

I come from a big family, and back in the day (late 1950's) when the time came to buy a second waffle iron, mom got a smaller one with removable/ reversible grids. It was ok most of the time, but a real pain when the waffle stuck, b/c the grids came out when mom or dad tried to pry the waffle apart. Plus, the waffles were smaller, which made them less popular than the 6" x 6" waffles from the Sunbeam W-2, and it had a tendency to overflow if over-filled.

Jun 10, 2013
gmkjr49 in Cookware

Cleaning Waffle Irons

Just scored a near-new condition Sunbeam W-2 waffle iron at a neighborhood estate sale. Grids are still bright aluminum, and it even had the original point-of-sale user card in the iron. I grew up with this model, and remember that Saturday was 'waffle day' during my early years.

The user card said the grids are pre-seasoned, but my first batch stuck, so I seasoned the grids in accordance with the instructions on the user card, which were 1) pre-heat the iron, 2) brush a scant layer of cooking oil on the grids, 3) close the iron and allow the grids to "season" for 10 minutes at full temperature. This did the trick, and there were no more sticking issues.

FWIW, this is the third W-2 I have bought in the past 20 years; It seems that they pop up at estate and rummage sales fairly often, and probably regularly on Ebay, too. This is the first I have seen without a shiny dark brown layer of "seasoning" on the grids. Think of a well-used cast iron skillet. In my experience, waffles cooked in these waffle irons will stick if they haven't been seasoned recently. I use a table knife and fork to remove the stuck-on waffle bits and pieces.

So, to answer your question, I would go the cooking oil route prescribed by Sunbeam, and avoid an aerosol spray to avoid the sticky residue they seem to leave behind. I wouldn't worry about trying to maintain the bright aluminum appearance of new grids, since the seasoning is what will ultimately prevent sticking.

Jun 10, 2013
gmkjr49 in Cookware