MickiYam's Profile

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What is this called: cold tofu and near-raw egg with cucumber pickle over rice

I've never paid much attention to the pickles in a bento, but my MIL makes various cucumber pickles. Some she nestles in miso for several weeks out in the shed, and some she makes "asa-zuke" style -- she usually uses a prepared marinade, but I'm sure you can find recipes for it. It's a very fresh pickle; I'm pretty sure the bento pickles are the ones that are pickled in miso, but I would like to hear what other people say.

Oct 19, 2014
MickiYam in Japan

homemade breakfast sausage?

I just adore it as sausage -- had hashbrowns, sausage and eggs with tomatoes and pickles for supper tonight. Best thing all week!

I'm not terribly picky about the texture, but I buy a meat that looks like it has some fat to it, and I grind it in the food processor. I've cheated with pre-ground meat, but I've found that ground pork is 1) more expensive than sliced pork in my area, 2) full of water that cooks out and leaves tough meat, and 3) just isn't as tasty.

If I didn't want to make up more hashbrowns, I think I'd brown the sausage, cube up some toast, and toss them together some onions and a white sauce -- maybe add some cheese. Bake as for a casserole (or stuffing). Or stir fry it with some cabbage and carrots?

Oct 19, 2014
MickiYam in Home Cooking

Can anyone help i have a picky 11 year old who is also a pescatarian?

This goes without saying. Ask your pediatrician. Also, make sure the kid is getting enough physical exercise.

Eleven is old enough to start cooking, too, if he has any interest. Look into cuisines of other countries, or maybe some artistic presentation.

Specifics: fish tacos? fish enchiladas? Japanese-style fish-in-foil dinners with white fish, carrot flowers, broccoli florets and maybe one new veggie wrapped in foil, baked for 10 min at 200C/400 F? This is served with rice and miso soup. There's also a very clean salad with rice vermicelli (or bean vermicelli) and julienned carrots and cucumbers. You can add dressing for the rest of the family.

Oct 14, 2014
MickiYam in Home Cooking

What goodies to send to Navy personnel

Yeah, whatever you do, don't package the salsa and the chips together, unless you really give that salsa a "safety belt". I got a non-military care package once of salsa and corn chip crumbs . . . the bag had opened, and I bet there was a trail of crumbs from Tokyo to my house.

My mother used to bake banana bread in coffee tins, and mail them to Vietnam.

Sep 30, 2014
MickiYam in Home Cooking

What's with all the lining up for hours for miserable, crappy food?

I'm not sure, but I would like to point out that properly made caramel corn is really addictive. I just used the CHOW recipe (had to substitute some origoto for the corn syrup because I ran out).

But the caramel corn sold at my local Ito Yokado? Bleh. Greasy clumps of just-not-right. Apparently I wasn't the only one who thought so, because there were no lines.

(-: I think we should be subversive and teach everyone how to make caramel corn at home.

Sep 28, 2014
MickiYam in Japan

Shokuyoku no Aki -- Delicious Autumn

We've had some really good apples. I think they were San-Tsugaru. Anything else on the apple front?

Also, had some persimmons that were very decent. I forget the cultivar, but they were early persimmons, and they were brown inside! The kids really kicked up a fuss, but they were tasty -- the brown wasn't spoilage (therefore, more for me!). Big seeds, though.

Sep 28, 2014
MickiYam in Japan

Shokuyoku no Aki -- Delicious Autumn

We finally got to the sanma last week. Kabayaki style -- roll in potato starch, deep fry, and we just used a reduced buta-don-tare to do a second sort of fry. It's like crack . . . I could nibble on those all evening long. And yes, this year really is a marvelous time for sanma.

Sep 28, 2014
MickiYam in Japan

Shokuyoku no Aki -- Delicious Autumn

Thanks for the salad ideas, both of you!

Sep 28, 2014
MickiYam in Japan

Most difficult ingredient ever!

(-: Whew, that's a relief! I know small children who enjoy making poo-shaped garnishes, and the tootsie roll is perfect for this.

One more idea -- what would happen to thinly rolled tootsie roll if you deep-fat fried it? Could be dangerous at several steps of the experiment. I do hope you'll report back about what you finally did.

Sep 28, 2014
MickiYam in Home Cooking

Most difficult ingredient ever!

Why not use that taffy texture? Roll thinly until the diameter is spaghetti width then chop and use as garnish. Or roll flat, sandwich with bacon, and then chop and use as garnish.
I am curious -- will children have to eat this?

Sep 25, 2014
MickiYam in Home Cooking

Shokuyoku no Aki -- Delicious Autumn

Update: "Matsutake" dobin mushi made with shiitake is basically ozoni without the mochi. Good, but nowhere near what I made on September 9th. Many thanks to my husband for pulling mochi out of the freezer and adding it to the soup . . . .

Next try: Eringi.

Sep 17, 2014
MickiYam in Japan

Shokuyoku no Aki -- Delicious Autumn

Yum! Now you've got me wondering, what else does nashi go well with? We often eat it with some nori-wrapped senbei (although I think that goes better with mikan). I'm thinking some sharp cheddar might be nice . . . .

(-: I would like ideas to turn nashi into a side dish or the star of a super-light meal.

Sep 17, 2014
MickiYam in Japan

Can you pickle celery?

I have an end-of-the-season recipe for pickled veggies that says celery is OK. I usually just pick what I've got -- green tomatoes, baby turnips, peppers, a hot pepper, two cloves of garlic, baby eggplant, etc. The brine is 1:1 vinegar and water, with about a teaspoon of salt per pint. It's a colorful and tasty pickle, and goes great with winter soups and some crusty bread. I'm sure celery would be a great addition, but my family doesn't grow it.

Sep 13, 2014
MickiYam in Home Cooking

First time in Japan (Opinion on my list of places to go to)

(-: I saw it and said a little hooray to myself. I love the cookie topping on a good melon pan. Stale melon pan? Bleh.

But my very favorite is mushi-pan. Mmmmm. (sorry, I have no recs -- I love it so much that even convenience store mushi-pan is enough to make me swoon.)

Sep 11, 2014
MickiYam in Japan

Shokuyoku no Aki -- Delicious Autumn

I tried the dobin-mushi from kitchn.com last night, and it was really, really good. But, it seemed more like cha-wan mushi without the eggs. That was fine -- I don't have the teapots, so I just made it in cha-wan mushi pots. Everyone really enjoyed it.

(But to be honest, I have to make it again soon with different mushrooms -- I got Chinese matsutake, and I just wasn't sure if the marvelous flavor was thanks to the shrimp and sake, or if it was mostly matsutake. I suspect erengi mushrooms would work very well in this dish, and they are less than a third of the price. Glad I did the experiment, though!)

The matsutake I bought came with sudachi and some evergreen fronds -- is there anything I can do with the fronds? Or are they just for pretty?

Sep 09, 2014
MickiYam in Japan

Two unrelated questions -- grammar and photos

And I have no problem with that. I don't work as a copy editor, and the computer programs these days fix it so it looks fine. And I can totally understand the person who would rather lose a teeny fraction of a second each time they double-space rather than waste three weeks retraining themselves. I *hated* re-training myself.

My problem is with totally imaginary people who will go around correcting the young folks' grammar and punctuation, when secretly they know "ur doin it rong 2". I know there's nobody like that here on this thread or on Chowhound (-:.

And I will note, everyone has different problems, and no one is obliged to make my problems their problems. *

*Steven Pinker, neurolinguist, makes a strong case for using the pronoun "their" with traditional singulars like "no one" and "everyone". Gosh, grammar policing makes me so paranoid!

Sep 09, 2014
MickiYam in Site Talk

Two unrelated questions -- grammar and photos

I must have been in the middle of the great changeover. Early 80s, two spaces in typing class. A few years later in college journalism, one space on a computer. My editors would yell when they had to strip out the extra spaces one by one, so we learned quickly.

One space is faster when you are used to it. Search and replace and programs do the job for professional double spacers when it matters. But content always trumps style.

Especially when composing on a thrice-bedamned phone.

Sep 09, 2014
MickiYam in Site Talk
1

Dill seed vs. fresh dill for refrigerator pickles

I'm not arguing with most of this, but I will note that I make both vinegar dill pickles that are sterilized with a water bath, and the same recipe as refrigerator pickles (5:7 vinegar water ratio). The refrigerator pickles definitely taste more like Klaussens, so they are picking up a wild fermentation from somewhere.

My grandmother made salt/water dill pickles with a grape leaf, and those had yet another taste.

I suspect the vinegar version is easier to maintain. And I find them quite tasty. (But so were Grandma's!)

Sep 08, 2014
MickiYam in Home Cooking

Dill seed vs. fresh dill for refrigerator pickles

Could be. I like a little fresh dillweed. And I find dried dill seed in jars to be a little too harsh for my tastes. The best thing in the world (for me) is green dill seed. I grew some in my MIL's greenhouse, and it keeps coming back every year (to her dismay -- she puts up with a lot from me, though!)

It seems to be a happy medium. Maybe you can find some at a farmer's market?

The culture that is causing a little fermentation in your pickles may also have something to do with the sweetness. But there's not much you can do about that . . . .

Sep 08, 2014
MickiYam in Home Cooking

Is there any type of substitution for lemon zest?

I suppose you could leave out the zest, but then you'd have Buttermilk Chess Pie, which would be different.

If you are worried about pesticides like I am, you can soak the lemon in some vinegar water, rinse well, then scrape the zest off with a veggie peeler and slice that thinly (no zester version).

If you are worried about pesticides in a different way than I am, then you wouldn't do that.

If I liked the recipe, I would be willing to try other citrus zest in place of the lemon, but if it's a new recipe, I'd make it as-is, when I had lemon zest.

Sep 08, 2014
MickiYam in Home Cooking

Shokuyoku no Aki -- Delicious Autumn

I adore a taste-testing! Was there clear matsutake winner that year at Kuragi, or was it a delightful debate with no real losers?

OK, this thread has convinced me that I need to make a serious effort to try matsutake this year. Let me know if you find some especially good ones in the stores (region, preparation). I think I'd like to try the soup, and then a separate dish sliced on the grill. There are eight of us at the dinner table, so it may get a little pricey -- but I'm sure it's not going to be any cheaper next year.

Sep 08, 2014
MickiYam in Japan

Shokuyoku no Aki -- Delicious Autumn

(-: I'm so glad people have made this fun.

I have to say, my MIL has been bringing in kabocha since late July, I think, but it's still flavorless. The kabocha segment of our tempura fest was a bit disappointing. It won't be long until it's really good, though.

Sep 08, 2014
MickiYam in Japan

Shokuyoku no Aki -- Delicious Autumn

Yum! Cute dishes, too. Love the faux basket that the grilled fish is in.

Sep 08, 2014
MickiYam in Japan

Canned salsa [moved from Prairie Provinces]

If you decide to freeze it (it should work great in chili; not sure how the texture will survive for dipping salsa), you can put the ziploc bag in a plastic container, then freeze it in square shapes -- pull out the ziploc, and you've got salsa blocks. Be sure to label well. Nothing like pulling something out of the bottom of the freezer, and not being sure which decade it is from . . . .

My MIL also freezes tomato sauce in ziploc bags flat on a cookie sheet -- they stack up easily, and we can break off however much we need, since they're only 1/2 inch (1 cm) thick.

Double agree with not freezing in large glass jars. I've had one explode, and once is enough . . . .

Sep 07, 2014
MickiYam in Home Cooking

Shokuyoku no Aki -- Delicious Autumn

And tonight is jugoya . . . I don't know how that snuck up on me. The moon didn't look that full last night . . . .

My daughter wants round butter cookies, which sounds like a good plan, and I like a cup of jasmine tea when moon-viewing. I should probably pick up some dango for the Old Folks at home. (-: And some cute paper for haiku? We really distort this whole moon-viewing thing at our house, but it's so darn fun.

Sep 07, 2014
MickiYam in Japan

Shokuyoku no Aki -- Delicious Autumn

I should snap up some peaches before they are gone. And the black plums . . . . We've just been eating so much melon and watermelon lately that it seems a little wasteful to buy fruit. But it's going to be gone all too soon.

Sep 07, 2014
MickiYam in Japan
1

Shokuyoku no Aki -- Delicious Autumn

OK, I need some education in the matsutake department. I only had it once, in Nagoya, as part of a sukiyaki dish, I think. I think it got lost in the dish, because it was very similar to erengi mushrooms at that point.

How else do you like it prepared?

The dobin-mushi seems like it would be a good bet. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dobin_mushi

Sep 07, 2014
MickiYam in Japan

Shokuyoku no Aki -- Delicious Autumn

Yum, yum, sanma! All of those oily fishes -- salmon is coming up soon, and before you know it, we'll be into winter's wakasagi.

What's your favorite sanma preparation? I like it year-round in the canned ginger-sauce version, but that is almost a completely different dish from fresh preparations.

Sep 07, 2014
MickiYam in Japan

Shokuyoku no Aki -- Delicious Autumn

I haven't done enough grilling this year! Shishito sounds great . . . maybe with a side of hokke, and a big pile of grated daikon.

My MIL uses a greenhouse up here in the frozen north, so we'll probably have tomatoes, eggplants and peppers until mid-October. The cukes, for some reason, always poop out around this time of year.

Sep 07, 2014
MickiYam in Japan

Shokuyoku no Aki -- Delicious Autumn

My MIL just uses the tempura pre-mixed flour. You know how when you get to the end of a batch of tempura, and it's hard to use it all up? She'll toss in all sorts of veggies and scoop the tempura into the oil. One of her combos is perilla (shiso), chiffonaded, and then raw corn kernels from just-picked maize. They cook just a little in the oil, and retain their sweetness.

Has anyone seen this combo in an izakaya? The sweetness of the corn goes great with the sharpness of the shiso -- add a really nice dipping sauce, and it's a great side-dish for an autumn evening meal.

Sep 07, 2014
MickiYam in Japan