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What to do with Self-rising flour?

Probably. I confess I didn't even look at the date. But given that this thread seems to have resurrected itself after years, there's obviously still some interest in the topic, and it may be useful for others to know.

Mar 03, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

What to do with Self-rising flour?

Katie has the self rising flour she bought accidentally. I was responding to Nancy, who had a hard time locating it in Toronto.

(Also, knowing what's in self rising flour might also help Katie figure out what to do with it.)

Mar 02, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

What to do with Self-rising flour?

You don't need to buy "self rising flour" Google recipes for "make self rising flour" and you'll find plenty of them. For example:

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/tips/h...

Its basically just flour, baking powder and salt. Nothing mysterious.

Mar 01, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Please recommend pressure cooking cookbooks

I agree with willownt, it seemed clear to me from reading the book that doing a pressure cooker cookbook was a grudging thing at best, and that pressure cooker of Christopher Kimball's that by his own account had languished on the shelf for lo these many years was only taken back off the shelf because of the cookbook, not because of any great newfound appreciation for pressure cookers.

To promise "foolproof" recipes, on the cover no less, and then deliver recipes that are anything but is not good.

One of my other big beefs with the cookbook is that while they tout the pressure cooker as a means to cook inexpensive cuts of meat, they then proceed to produce recipes that use anything but. Every recipe with ground beef uses 85/15, which is far more expensive than 80/20. Use the standard, write an extra step and drain the fat. And top sirloin roast, flank steak, pork tenderloin, and tons of boneless short ribs. Not what I would consider budget cuts of meat. Not to mention almost all the herbs are fresh, and that's fine when you have an herb garden, but if you don't, fresh herbs can add a lot to the cost of the dish.

Feb 21, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Please recommend pressure cooking cookbooks

Oh yeah, 4 quarts is a very limiting size. You wouldn't be able to do a whole chicken or big pot roast or pork shoulder, or do a decent sized amount of beans, or a large stew. And to make your own stock, you'd want at least a 6 or 8 quart pressure cooker.

Feb 17, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Roasting a Chicken - am I doing too much?

Well, if you don't uncover the chicken, you're probably going to have a steamed skin instead of a crisp one.

If you're worried about the meat being juicy, well, go ahead and brine it again, and for at least 24 hours in salted water, because the salt diffuses into the meat very, very slowly, but (1) make sure you don't overcook it - meat thermometers are your friend: stop 5 or 10 degrees short of your target temperature and the chicken during resting will rise up the remainder even while resting outside the oven; (2) Ruhlman apparently stuffs some cut lemons inside the bird cavity to keep the breast meat from overcooking from the interior, and I've used a raw, uncooked potato in the cavity to do the same thing; and (3) if want to keep the moisture out of the skin, but want to wet brine the meat, or if you don't have time to marinade the meat for a full 24 hours (or more) Modernist Cuisine at Home has a really clever idea: get a marinade injector and inject the salt solution directly into the middle of the breast meat and the thighs (without piercing the skin) - that cuts down on the time for the salt to migrate into the meat, and keeps the skin from getting wet.

Feb 17, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking
1

Please recommend pressure cooking cookbooks

As I said, it can be hit or miss, and maybe some of the "miss" has to do with stovetop v. electric pressure cookers, but I find it helps to have some experience with pressure cookers, and your own in particular, when going through the recipes to know how you should adjust the recipes for best results. (And mind you, I have one of the electric pressure cookers they rated the highest, so its not like I have a bad machine.)

If you have to have experience to know how to adjust the recipes, that doesn't make it optimal for beginners. In their reviews of electric pressure cookers, they even remarked that one or more of the brands of electric pressure cookers turned off while cooking - well, yes, they'll do that if you don't put enough water in, that's a feature, not a bug. (I never had a similar problem with even one recipe from any of the other pressure cooker cookbooks I have tried.)

Feb 17, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Electric pressure cooker with slow cooker, rice cooker, etc functions...

I recommend Pressure Perfect as your first Lorna Sass cookbook, its got a lot of very useful timetables for a variety of meats, vegetables, beans, etc.

Feb 11, 2014
ePressureCooker in Cookware

Salmon in a pressure cooker?

I'm still perfecting it, but yeah, it was an interesting discussion and it did come out pretty well. The guinea pigs have certainly enjoyed it. ;D

Feb 11, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Electric pressure cooker with slow cooker, rice cooker, etc functions...

Electric pressure cookers will take a few minutes longer to come up to pressure than stovetop models (although that difference might not be as great if you have an electric stove instead of a gas model) but I find that compensates for the fact that electric PCs don't get up to the same pressure (PSI) as most stovetop models do. It all equals out, more or less.

Pressure cooker recipes always say "5 minutes under pressure" or "5 minutes at high pressure" because its hard to estimate how long it will take for multiple different machines to pressurize and depressurize. I try to include my estimates, based on my epc, but its quite possible for others to experience different numbers. And how fast the machine pressurizes also depends on the volume of the food in the pot, so if you do a 5 pound roast it'll take longer to come up to pressure than a 3 pound roast with the same recipe, and if you double that rice recipe, it'll take longer as well. Takes about 10 minutes for the machine to come up to pressure with most things (and that's my Cuisinart electric pressure cooker, not an instant pot)

Feb 11, 2014
ePressureCooker in Cookware

Salmon in a pressure cooker?

You're welcome. I totally understand. There was one thread on doing a whole chicken in a pressure cooker where someone asked about it, and the response was pretty negative, IIRC. Then one other person and I both posted that we do it all the time, comes out just fine, and here's how we do it. At least one other person actually tried my method, and said it came out well.

Though I must admit salmon and fish in general aren't one of those things that are best suited for the pressure cooker, they aren't a natural "fit" for it, which means you have to be careful about handling them. That doesn't mean you can't do it, and it won't work out well, that just means one has to be particularly careful about how you do it.

Feb 11, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Salmon in a pressure cooker?

Much as I love my pressure cooker, salmon isn't something I've personally tried making in it. However, I checked my pressure cooking cookbooks, and several of them had recipes, in case you own any of these books:

MISS VICKIE'S BIG BOOK OF PRESSURE COOKER RECIPES
Salmon Croquettes with Lemon Cheese Sauce (p. 326)
Salmon Steaks in Smoky Mpale Balsamic Glaze (p. 335)

THE COMPLETE IDIOT'S GUIDE TO PRESSURE COOKING
Salmon Chowder (p. 124)

THE PRESSURED COOK
Salmon and Corn Chowder (p. 159)

EXPRESS COOKING
Salmon Steaks (p. 115)
Salmon Wraps (p. 111)

THE PRESSURE COOKER GOURMET
Atlantic Salmon Roast Poached in Red Wine Court Bouillon with Arugula Pesto (p. 155)
Salmon and Fennel Chowder with Green Peppercorn Mayonnaise (p. 47)
Gravlax Risotto (p. 224)

Feb 10, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Please recommend pressure cooking cookbooks

Not just beans. You can make potatoes for potato salad in it, corn on the cob, lots of other sides, but that's not all, either. You can make your own sauces, you can for example precook short ribs in the pressure cooker and then finish them off on the grill, etc.

Feb 06, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Please recommend pressure cooking cookbooks

You're welcome. Pork butt is GREAT for tacos, and you won't have to brine it, well, unless you really want to. A big old 5 or so pound piece can fit in my electric pressure cooker (maybe more in yours, if you have a stovetop PC). Cut it up into just three or four pieces to help it along, what I've recently started doing is cutting it in half height wise, to keep those shreds shorter, and then cutting it in half the other way. Should take about 50 - 55 minutes under pressure (more if you live at altitude) and the meat will be meltingly soft and tender, you can shred it with your finger tips. You can even use the cooking broth to make soup - I like to make either split pea or bean with bacon soup with it.

Feb 06, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Please recommend pressure cooking cookbooks

No BBQ blasphemy involved, or there shouldn't be: the pressure cooker is a great way to make baked beans, potatoes for potato salad, your own BBQ sauce (without the high fructose corn syrup), and to precook things like short ribs and chicken to be finished off on the BBQ.

As for bloggers discovering the pressure cooker, you don't say? ;D

Feb 05, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking
2

Please recommend pressure cooking cookbooks

I used to be very intimidated by pressure cookers. The first pressure cooker I worked up the courage to buy, I read the instruction manual, chickened out, and gave it to my sister. Then she bought an electric pressure cooker, and she loved hers so much, and raved about it so much, I bought the same model.

As for that pork chop recipe, there's a likely explanation for that. Pressure cookers work best with meat cuts that have a lot of connective tissue and fat, thinking working muscles, the cuts in parts of the animal that bear weight like the shoulder and neck, or are involved in locomotion and movement, like meat cuts from legs. In the pig, pork butt and pork shoulder are ideal, ham will work, lean, drier cuts like pork chops (which come from the middle of the pig and contain little in the way of connective tissues) are much less ideal.

That's not to say you can't cook pork chops in the pressure cooker, but like turkey breasts, you have to be careful with them, and baby them more than you would other cuts of pork or turkey legs. Choose the thickest cuts of pork chops you can find. Brine them (soak them in a salt water solution) for at least 24 hours before cooking them. The salt will not only flavor the meat, and denature (soften) the proteins, but will help a little bit with moisture retention. You also have to be careful not to cook pork chops too long, because the softening of the meat happens really quickly, and if you go too long, the pressure cooker will do a really good job of driving all the moisture and fat out of the meat. And always be sure to use natural release, not quick release - apparently abrupt pressure changes can toughen the meat.

(It hasn't been easy, but I have managed to figure out how to get a tasty moist turkey breast out of the pressure cooker.)

Feb 04, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Please recommend pressure cooking cookbooks

I concur. I use "Pressure Perfect" more than I do "Cooking Under Pressure" - it also has some very nice pressure cooking timetables that would be especially useful for a newbie. ;D

Feb 04, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Please recommend pressure cooking cookbooks

Don't get me wrong - there's some useful stuff in that particular cookbook. I've just found it a very contradictory and frustrating experience using the recipes as written. The first couple I tried, BBQ beans, pulled pork, mac n' cheese, weeknight chili, all turned out really well, and I thought, gee I don't understand all the bad reviews on Amazon. Then I tried additional recipes that did not work so well. The chicken and rice recipe, the minute I read it, I said that's not enough liquid, that's going to run out in about 3 minutes as the rice absorbs all the water, but since I was doing the recipes to review the book, I did it as written. Sure enough, the machine shut off pressure 3 - 4 minutes in. I tried the chickpea and artichoke tagine, it was a little watery for my taste, but it was OK. Tried the 15 bean soup and it was OK, the family liked it well enough, but I felt they used the wrong technique for the sausage, it was rubbery, and had been cooked so long all the flavor was in the soup, and none left in the sausage. Then I tried the meatloaf recipe, and I said to myself oh boy, I think this is done in such a way the machine is going to turn off for lack of liquid, and ten or fifteen minutes in, it did just that, even though I had followed the instructions scrupulously.

So its a mixed bag, and it would really help to have some experience with your pressure cooker to have a better idea when the liquid included in the recipe will be insufficient.

Feb 04, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Please recommend pressure cooking cookbooks

Actually, topeater, I don't find that so strange that you like sichuan, Thai and Mexican, but your husband doesn't tolerate Indian food so well - the first three are heavy on chiles, on heat, on capsaicin, whereas Indian food is very heavy on spices per se. I have members of my family who have the same sort of food preferences / aversions as your husband.

In that case, I would recommend Pressure Cooker Gourmet as well as Pressure Perfect - its heavy on European cuisine, but there's some gourmet stuff, some Mexican, and even some Asian dishes. That seems the most in line with your palate preferences.

Feb 04, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Please recommend pressure cooking cookbooks

I second the recommendation for Pressure Perfection as your first Lorna Sass PC cookbook.

I don't recommend Pressure Cooker Perfection for newbies because there are some problems with the recipes in terms of the volume of water added (at least with electric pressure cookers, some recipes add too little and the machine turns off to protect itself - wait until you have more experience then you'll know to adjust the recipes in advance).

But to give you other recommendations, let me ask this: what do you like? Are you a gourmand? Are you fond of vegetable / vegetarian dishes? Do you like traditional comfort food or Southern food? The more I know about your tastes, the better a recommendation I can make.

Feb 04, 2014
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Roast chicken left out overnight - ok to pressure cook for stock?

There is a heartbreaking thread elsewhere on Chowhound where a woman talks about how her health was permanently negatively impacted - and in serious, bad ways - through eating chicken that was not properly cooked at a restaurant. Admittedly, this chicken was cooked first and then left out, but after reading what she had to say, as well as my own personal experience in my early 20s with a very mild case of salmonella (the worst illness of my life, I wanted to die), I'd say nothing, absolutely nothing is worth risking your health and wellbeing.

Jan 29, 2014
ePressureCooker in General Topics

Electric pressure cooker with slow cooker, rice cooker, etc functions...

I would definitely recommend getting a copy of Pressure Perfect - its got some nice charts, timetables, etc. that are very useful.

Jan 23, 2014
ePressureCooker in Cookware

Pressure cooking cabbage for cabbage rolls?

Much as I love the pressure cooker, I don't think it would be the best thing for your particular purpose. If you pressure cooked it for 3 minutes as GeezerGourmet suggested (and yes, I've done this), it'd be the fully cooked, mushy texture that corned beef and cabbage is. It'd be way overcooked for your purposes.

I think Robin has the best approach. Remove the core, separate the leaves, and either boil or blanch them. You could use salted water for a little flavor and to speed up the breakdown of the cell walls. But I think blanching would give you the greatest control as far as getting the cabbage soft enough to create cabbage rolls, but not TOO soft.

Dec 28, 2013
ePressureCooker in Cookware

Can a whole chicken be prepared in a 6L pressure cooker?

There's probably a typo - you should NEVER operate a pressure cooker without adding water. You could actually damage your cooker, aside from the fact that it won't work if there isn't enough liquid to produce steam.

You won't get nearly the same results with an oven roasted sweet potato as you would with the baking soda in the pressure cooker version. I'd add at least a cup of water to the sweet potato in the second round.

Dec 23, 2013
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Can a whole chicken be prepared in a 6L pressure cooker?

Thank you, I'm glad you found it helpful / informative.

As far as Modernist Cuisine at Home, I love it. Very interesting. I love experimenting with food preparation, and all the things I can figure out to do in my pressure cooker, so its right up my alley, (Though its really making me wish I had a sous vide and a combi oven, too, but neither is in the budget.)

Before I'd ever looked at it, I'd read that they used baking soda in small amounts in the pressure cooker to change the pH slightly to make the Maillard reaction happen in a moist environment, to make a caramelized carrot soup. The minute I read that, I went bonkers, it was an epiphany, I figured if it worked with carrots, it would work with a bunch of other things. Made French onion soup with it, cooked garlic in the pressure cooker with it, started caramelizing mirepoix, and then I started experimenting with stock and meat. Its been really interesting.

And of course, when I finally got hold of the book, I found they had used the baking soda trick to make caramelized onions, too, though they did it in a different way than I had done. (I want to try their method and compare.) And there are a surprisingly large number of pressure cooker recipes in it, and they really seem to get how to get the most out of pressure cooking food.

So far, I've made the pork adobo, it was delicious, had such an intense, rich flavor. I'm rounding up the ingredients to make the carnitas. And I tried part of their recipe for roast chicken (they dipped the bird in boiling water repeatedly like Peking Duck, I just cooked it in the pressure cooker to render some of the moisture and fat out of the skin and soften the meat) - but instead of butter, as I'd been using, I brushed the chicken skin with soy sauce, and darned if it didn't look and taste a lot like the Costco roast chickens. I'd always wondered what they put on their chickens to give the skin that color, taste. ;D

Dec 22, 2013
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Holiday food shopping at Costco. .

If you are genetically incapable of carving a turkey, are you also incapable of boning a turkey? Its much easier than carving (I think so, anyway), you won't have people watching you making you nervous, and if you butterfly it before cooking, it'll make service so much easier, carving largely irrelevant and your turkey will cook in a fraction of the time...

Dec 16, 2013
ePressureCooker in Chains
1

Can a whole chicken be prepared in a 6L pressure cooker?

Great! Glad you found it useful. Since posting the above, I have made an additional improvement. I read somewhere that when roasting chickens, Michael Ruhlman puts either an onion or lemons inside the bird cavity to help keep the breast meat from overcooking. I didn't want to use lemons because of the flavor they might add, possible acidity issues and they probably would become soft pretty quickly. I also opted against onion because I thought it too would become soft and lose its shape (and not block or absorb as much energy as a result) so I used a peeled raw potato instead.

Place a peeled, raw potato inside the bird's cavity (try to pick one that will fill the cavity as completely as possible, its okay if it sticks out the back). Keep that potato there both while pressure cooking and finishing off the bird in the oven, and the white meat will be moister and closer to where it should be. The potato does complicate the removal of the bird from the pressure cooker, you can either make some foil straps to put beneath the bird to lift it up, or you could temporarily remove the potato and then put it back in right after removing it from the pressure cooker.

The potato won't be cooked enough, even after pressure cooking and the stint in the oven to eat, however, you could always cook it for a few additional minutes while you let the bird rest, or finish cooking it the next day, so there's no waste.

Dec 06, 2013
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Holiday food shopping at Costco. .

That's good to know because ours was PACKED at 3pm today, when we thought it would be much, much better. Yikes.

Dec 02, 2013
ePressureCooker in Chains

Holiday food shopping at Costco. .

On a whim, my father bought a 7 pound rib roast (with bones) for Thanksgiving and my sister decided to just make beef instead of messing with turkey, too. We had talked about whether she should halve it and freeze half to cook for Christmas. Good thing she didn't listen to my advice and cooked the whole thing: she said the men in the family (my father, her husband, and 9 year old son) just descended upon it like cavemen who'd never seen roast beast before and ate the whole thing up. No leftovers. None. She said she doesn't know why she bothered making all these side dishes because the men basically ate the beef and potatoes, and very little else.

I told her next year, make your life easier and just throw raw steak and a bowl of mashed potatoes at them and be done with it.

Dec 02, 2013
ePressureCooker in Chains
5

Do you cook too much?

Okay, then she could contact a local church. I'm sure there are plenty of churches that either have programs to feed the hungry or perhaps have parishoners on a small fixed income who could use and appreciate some extra meals. No doubt there are lots of folks who have lost their SNAP benefits or now will be unable to receive them in the future, who would greatly appreciate some extra Chowhound cooked fare.

Dec 01, 2013
ePressureCooker in General Topics