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Emson Pressure Smoker.

Guess it wouldn't matter so much for pizza or mac n' cheese, but ideally, you don't want the cheese to melt. IIRC at least with cheddar (and possibly other kinds of cheese) it risks breaking the emulsion and the cheese getting "greasy".

Emson Pressure Smoker.

I seem to recall a mention of smoked salt, and perhaps flour, but this is the first I've read re using the actual smoked water. I did wonder if it were concentrated how close it would come to "liquid smoke" - but sounds like you're using a diluted version. . .interesting.

Emson Pressure Smoker.

I've always smoked it straight from the freezer. You want it as cold as possible so it doesn't melt when you smoke it, because the wood chips do provide some heat, even though you're cold smoking, not using the pressure and hot smoking it.

I also wrap it up tightly in plastic wrap and then let it sit in the fridge for a week before eating it.

Emson Pressure Smoker.

I felt the Jack Daniels chips (which are re-purposed from used whiskey barrels) were overpriced and didn't add anything, so I personally wouldn't buy them again.

The apple chips bag had the least amount of chips of the right size by far, certainly not enough that I would consider it worth it to buy a bag of them if you didn't want to use the garden shears to cut the larger pieces down again. My recollection is the pecan wood had the most usable pieces, and looking at the bags now its definitely the emptiest.

Emson Pressure Smoker.

I eat more chicken than pork too, but if you want a quick something to smoke to test differences, try some pork sausages. Smoked hot dogs are awesome, smoked pork sausages and ham even better. Even an ordinary supermarket ham is so delish when its been cut into thick slices and smoked.

Emson Pressure Smoker.

Interesting. I've only tried chicken and turkey parts so far, maybe I should try a whole chicken and let it go longer.

If you want to introduce more flavor, instead of a marinade you could try adding some sort of flavored liquid to the pot, like a little beer or wine along with water, or use apple or grape juice instead of water. It might be interesting to combine apple wood smoke along with apple juice or apple cider.

Emson Pressure Smoker.

I've got the Weber apple chips (as well as cherry, pecan, some cut up whiskey barrel chips and another brand of hickory chips) and having rooted through them all to find the right size chips, I don't think its so much a question of one brand necessarily having the right size chips and another not.

It seems to be the way the wood is splintering up when its cut into chips. The apple seems to tear into long, "stringy" pieces, whereas the other kinds of wood, pecan, cherry and hickory seem to stay more chunky, even if some of those chunks are larger.

I've been reserving the smaller pieces for the Emson, and the larger pieces for outdoor smoking, but if you can't do that, and the garden shears are a pain, maybe it would be easier to stick to cherry or pecan chips instead, since many of them seem to be a more manageable size, and last time I bought them they were $3.99 a bag, which is pretty cheap even if you don't end up using them all, you could always toss a few of the bigger ones in the fireplace to make a nice smell next time you light it up.

Emson Pressure Smoker.

I've found that I can never get a really heavy smoke taste on chicken or turkey, at least I haven't been able to manage it yet, whereas pork and beef seem to develop a much smokier flavor. No idea if this is true in regular smoking as well, but its definitely more subtle in poultry.

As for marinades, I agree, I'd be fearful that it would overwhelm the delicate smoke flavor. I just brine it in a salt water solution to make the meat more flavorful, and it helps it retain moisture as well, helps keep the white meat in particular from overcooking.

I should add I haven't been able to detect much of a taste difference between the kinds of woods myself. Maybe I don't have a sensitive enough pallette. One difference that I did read about however, was about mesquite, which apparently burns much hotter, and possibly faster, and therefore generates more heat in a short amount of time, than other types of wood. That's definitely one thing to keep in mind when selecting wood chips.

Pressure cooker recommendations?

Although for those who don't know the difference, the IP-LUX60 is a slightly older model, and it doesn't include the yogurt making function that the DUO has, but other than that, there aren't any significant differences that I'm aware of.

But you're right, those machines don't seem to go on sale very often, or indeed ever, so if someone is considering an Instant Pot, and doesn't care about yogurt, I'd advise them to go for it.

Apr 19, 2015
ePressureCooker in Cookware

Dilemma with choice for Pressure Cooker: Which is better "Instant Pot IP Duo" or "Cuisinart CPC-600" or something else?

That's the kind of cheating we can all get behind. ;D

Pressure cooker recommendations?

Ah, OK, I also subscribe to those but never saw upcoming deals. But I figured out you're going through the links and then clicking on the "upcoming" tab under the Lightning Deals. Very interesting and good to know.

Apr 18, 2015
ePressureCooker in Cookware

Pressure cooker recommendations?

How did you find out about this?

Apr 18, 2015
ePressureCooker in Cookware

Dilemma with choice for Pressure Cooker: Which is better "Instant Pot IP Duo" or "Cuisinart CPC-600" or something else?

Ah yes, a half hour is a long time for the rice to wait.

Well, until you can get a new rice cooker, I'm told there are recipes for making rice in the oven (a toaster oven should work, too, if you don't want to heat up a large oven) that work very well. If you had an oven safe pan or skillet of the right size, you should be able to sweat your aromatics on top of the stove, toast the rice if needed, and then add the broth, cover and place in the oven.

Apr 15, 2015
ePressureCooker in Cookware

Dilemma with choice for Pressure Cooker: Which is better "Instant Pot IP Duo" or "Cuisinart CPC-600" or something else?

Duffy, I read somewhere that in Europe the average household has THREE pressure cookers. I've used that many at one time, I must admit (though its an old house, so I make sure they're each plugged into different electrical plugs). Its especially great to have multiple electric pressure cookers during the holidays, it frees up burners for other dishes, and I can make soup in one, mashed potatoes in another, and rice, side dishes, or even dessert in a third, and they make great "chafing dishes" to keep the food warm until I'm ready to serve it.

But while you only have one, there are two ways you can do this. Make the rice first, then spoon the hot chile colorado over it to reheat it, or depending on the length of time you pressure cook your chile colorado, if it was about ten minutes under pressure, you could actually add brown rice to the pot, plus enough water to adjust for the absorption of the rice, and make everything together in one pot.

Apr 15, 2015
ePressureCooker in Cookware

Dilemma with choice for Pressure Cooker: Which is better "Instant Pot IP Duo" or "Cuisinart CPC-600" or something else?

Mareb, if you've owned your Cuisinart for less than three years, and still have some way to prove when you bought it (a receipt) you can get Cuisinart to replace the bottom part of the machine (since the panel lights burned out) - they have a three year warranty. Obviously, they're not responsible for the damage to the pressure valve, but if they send you a completely new machine, then that problem will be resolved as well, happily.

Apr 15, 2015
ePressureCooker in Cookware

Dilemma with choice for Pressure Cooker: Which is better "Instant Pot IP Duo" or "Cuisinart CPC-600" or something else?

All true, but one generally uses a lot less water inside a pressure cooker than in a pot even when making sauces. I'm finding lately my IP is having more sticking issues, and even a little scorching, be it with rice, or dishes with tomatoes in them, and I've been trying to figure out what's causing the problem, or more importantly, how to fix it.

Giving the bottom a good scrubbing with Barkeepers Friend as Lorna Sass recommended for cleaning didn't do it, not even after the second or third time I tried, layering food so the tomatoes were on top didn't do it, not entirely, a few dropped down into the bottom of the pot, so now I'm trying to resolve the problem in other ways. Won't be any worse off than I am now, not that its that much of an issue, but still, would like to nip it in the bud before it gets worse.

Mar 30, 2015
ePressureCooker in Cookware

Dilemma with choice for Pressure Cooker: Which is better "Instant Pot IP Duo" or "Cuisinart CPC-600" or something else?

If it makes you feel any better, pressure cookers do really nice ribs, though! You can crust them up and everything, as long as you keep them on top of a vegetable steamer to keep them out of the liquid, and then pop them into a high oven for a few minutes at the end to crisp up the coating (so far, the coating has never come off, just gotten a little moist, but high heat in the oven takes care of that).

Can't beat how quickly pressure cookers will turn baby backs, beef ribs, short ribs, etc. tender. I'm making my Easter leg of lamb (boneless) in my electric pressure cooker this year!

Mar 30, 2015
ePressureCooker in Cookware
1

Dilemma with choice for Pressure Cooker: Which is better "Instant Pot IP Duo" or "Cuisinart CPC-600" or something else?

I'll just add for clarity, for anyone else who happens to stumble upon this, I wasn't suggesting heating the oil under pressure to season the inner pot. That would be extremely dangerous. I'll be heating it on saute or browning, just to before the smoking point, with the lid off, then pulling the inner pot out so the oil won't get overheated.

Mar 29, 2015
ePressureCooker in Cookware

Dilemma with choice for Pressure Cooker: Which is better "Instant Pot IP Duo" or "Cuisinart CPC-600" or something else?

OK, in that case, what I would recommend is, assuming you are using white rice, is using long grain white rice, ratio of 1.5 parts water for every 1 part of rice. (With that ratio of water, gelatinization of the grains will be reduced, and there'll be less chance of the amylopectin becoming sticky.) Rinse the rice thoroughly before adding it to the pot, if you want to add a little wine or something acidic in place of an equal volume of water that would help keep the rice grains intact, along with as you mentioned, toasting the rice just a tad pilaf style before adding the water.

Then you can either cook it for 3 minutes on high pressure and be sure and use quick release and get it out of the inner pot as quickly as possible, or pressure cook it for 3 minutes on low pressure, at which point it will still be slightly undercooked, and you allow the machine to depressurize naturally so the rice finishes cooking slowly, and this method its much less likely to stick.

Mar 28, 2015
ePressureCooker in Cookware

Dilemma with choice for Pressure Cooker: Which is better "Instant Pot IP Duo" or "Cuisinart CPC-600" or something else?

Instant Pot used to have a nonstick pot available? I did not know that.

But actually, I may have some advice for you on the rice issue as well (I'm assuming here you're having sticking problems, correct?)

One of my relatives recently received a preliminary diagnosis of auto immune disorder, and as a result, they had to change all their nonstick pots and pans to stainless steel. Needless to say, they had a lot of sticking problems. Then they found this video on Youtube for how to make stainless steel pans nonstick. What you basically do is put some oil in the pan and heat it up really hot, almost to the smoking point, and then turn the heat off and remove the pan from the burner. It really helped them on the "stickiness" issue.

I decided that I should try the same thing with my Instant Pot, only removing the inner pot after getting the oil hot so it doesn't overheat. It didn't quite work the way I had hoped, so I did some research, including how cast iron skillets are seasoned. From my research, my mistake was using coconut oil, it would be much better to use an oil which has more unsaturated fat, which means avoid animal fats and coconut oil, and use something like regular vegetable oil or peanut oil.

Now I haven't actually tried this with a different oil yet, but it should help. The heated unsaturated oil actually form polymers which form a permanent bond with the surface of the pot, which helps prevent the food from sticking to the bottom. The video said this was only good as long as you don't use soap on the pot, but my research indicates that's wrong, the polymer bond is permanent, and can't be washed off. (Unsaturated oils apparently form more polymers or better bonded polymers, I'm not sure what the difference is, I'll have to ask my friend who's a chemist).

Mar 28, 2015
ePressureCooker in Cookware

Dilemma with choice for Pressure Cooker: Which is better "Instant Pot IP Duo" or "Cuisinart CPC-600" or something else?

Paul, I haven't tried carrots per se, but I have done some research and experimentation re the Modernist Cuisine use of baking soda to facilitate the caramelization process (the Maillard reaction) with other things, including making mashed potatoes and gravy in the pot together at the same time, as well as sprinkling a little bit on the surface of pan seared steaks and hamburgers to make them more tasty, and I have some advice for you.

First, be sure and add some salt to the pot when you do this. Salt helps keeps the base water soluble, and that really helps the reaction.

Second, I've found the Instant Pot doesn't quite reach the same temperatures as my Cuisinart does, so sometimes the reaction needs a little "help". If you notice just a faint bitter taste, or want to avoid it altogether, you can either add some protein, either a little butter, or some meat, or for vegans, there are vegetable based gelatin powders (I haven't nailed down the exact amount, I've been adding 1 teaspoon of gelatin powder to the gravy.) That changes the chemical reactions to eliminate any potential bitterness.

Mar 27, 2015
ePressureCooker in Cookware

Dilemma with choice for Pressure Cooker: Which is better "Instant Pot IP Duo" or "Cuisinart CPC-600" or something else?

Duffy, you ought to see how many really "old" threads - some a decade old - get routinely resurrected on Chowhound. This is fairly recent.

From my experience, the amount of water you would want to add depends on how long you will be cooking under pressure and what you are cooking. If you're cooking something quicker like chicken or turkey or diced pork or beef, you could get away with as little as 1/2 cup of liquid, because meat will release a lot of juices during the cooking process. I specify a cup of liquid just to be on the safe side. You'll always end up with more liquid than you started with. For something longer cooking like a pot roast or a pork shoulder, I'd add the full cup of water, just to be safe, even knowing that the meat will give off even more liquid.

The only time I've ever had a problem with small quantities of food and water was with rice. Tried a can of condensed soup, one cup of water and a half cup of rice and the rice ended up sticking like crazy to the bottom. If you're making rice in it, I'd say no less than a cup of dried rice, with a cup and a half of liquid.

Mar 27, 2015
ePressureCooker in Cookware

Salmon in a pressure cooker?

My sister does not like salmon at all, and she made some in the pressure cooker for her family (who do like salmon) and she said it was the first salmon she's ever liked, and that she'd make it again.

Jan 19, 2015
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Emson Pressure Smoker.

Apple wood chips are fairly mild, and my understanding is the lighter colored the wood, which apple wood is, the less likely that tannins should be an issue, so that's good. Plus it doesn't generate as much heat as mesquite or hickory would. Freezing the cheese overnight should help keep the cheese the right temperature through the end of smoking so it won't get overwarm and get oily / greasy.

Emson Pressure Smoker.

That's true - most of the standard cold cheese smoking guides I've read recommend tightly wrapping the cheese in plastic wrap, refrigerating it, and if possible, not even attempting to eat it for at least a week after smoking. (I'm assuming this allows the smoke taste to mellow and/or that the smoke taste diffuses more evenly through the cheese, or possibly both.)

Emson Pressure Smoker.

What kind of wood chips did you use? It could be tannins you're tasting. Also, was the cheese in any way greasy or oily? Personally, I would have frozen the cheese before smoking it, with just refrigeration it probably was heated more than you want.

Can a whole chicken be prepared in a 6L pressure cooker?

Interesting. I would imagine a good wet brine of the pork roast the next time would really improve the texture and moistness of the outer chops. I've never done a pork rib roast in the pressure cooker, but I find wet brines do wonders for pork loin and pork chops.

Jan 04, 2015
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Can a whole chicken be prepared in a 6L pressure cooker?

Thanks. My sister also cooks beef ribs most of the way in the pressure cooker and then finishes them off on the grill. Makes it much quicker and easier.

I should also add, another way to go is to do pressure cook the chicken a day or more in advance, pat the skin dry, then instead of putting in the oven, store the chicken, uncovered, in the refrigerator overnight to allow the refrigerator to help dehydrate the skin (which will help it to crisp up in the oven).

Jan 04, 2015
ePressureCooker in Home Cooking

Can a whole chicken be prepared in a 6L pressure cooker?

I've basically done what you've done dozens and dozens of times, and I would advise against cooking breast side down - it will actually overcook the breasts because of their proximity to the heat source (when heating up and depressurizing).

Instead, I would recommend brining the chicken as you usually do. The salt will not only soften the breast meat, and improve its flavor, but help it retain moisture. Don't bother browning the chicken beforehand, there's little point to my mind, the pressure cooking makes the skin flabby so you lose any crispness you got, it causes enough of the moisture and fat to render so you can crisp it up in the oven in a few minutes. I would also recommend peeling a potato and stuffing it inside the chicken cavity to keep the breasts from also being cooked from the inside, as well as the outside. Lastly, if you really want to make absolutely sure the breast meat is moist, once the machine has depressurized, you can remove the chicken, flip it over in a bowl or other large container, and pour the broth over the chicken and allow the meat to cool in the broth. As the meat cools, it will reabsorb some of the broth. Then when its cooled enough you can handle it, flip it breast side up, and pat the skin dry before putting it in the oven.

Dilemma with choice for Pressure Cooker: Which is better "Instant Pot IP Duo" or "Cuisinart CPC-600" or something else?

The IP claims a range of 10.2 - 11.6 PSI, and in my personal experience, its probably at the low end of the range. Cuisinart claims 10 PSI, but the temperature measured by America's Test Kitchen in Pressure Cooking Perfection (somewhere in the 240s) corresponds to a higher PSI, and in my personal experience, is higher than the Instantpot. (There also seems to be a difference for the low pressure settings as well, in Cuisinart's favor.) I live at 1,003 feet above sea level.

Where this is going to make a difference is for example when pressure cooking hardboiled eggs, I have to add a minute or two onto the time for the IP. I add a minute for potato chunks as well. And I do this combined recipe for mashed potatoes in gravy made in the pressure cooker at the same time where its obvious to me from the browning of the chicken broth in the two that the Cuisinart definitely reaches a higher temperature each and every time than the InstantPot. But I don't make any corrections for longer cooking items like stews and pork and beef roasts, and even if you have to, it isn't going to amount to that much of a difference.

If I were in your shoes, I'd give preference to the stainless steel aspect and not sweat the couple of degrees difference. Especially since last time I looked at the Cuisinart website, they had significantly raised the price of a replacement pot to around $50, whereas the IP pots are around $30, which makes a big difference if you want multiple inserts to do back to back dishes or if you scratch one of those nonstick pots and need to replace it.