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Pinky107's Profile

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Does anyone else consider this rude?

Your makiing that point has been as clear as mud! Additionally, I suggest you read up on American history in the early 1900's, especially in the Midwest. If a woman did NOT fish and hunt, and butcher their home grown livestock on occasion, they would have been considered lazy. Then they were tasked with the preservation of these foods.

As to the question of the difference between a woman and a lady: That's as ludicrist a question as what is the difference between a man and a gentleman. The first descriptive in both cases goes to gender. The second descriptive goes to knowing how to respond respectfully and courteously to others. And, yes, we should "hold on to (sic) the concept of what it is to be a lady. If a woman isn't a lady, she's likely just a broad. If a man isn't a gentleman, he's likely just a boor. Judgmental, yes! But that IS the world we live in whether or not anyone chooses to like it and participate or not.

Jun 11, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Does anyone else consider this rude?

Thank you for your gracious reply. If I "commit some kind of social trespass", I aplogize (if it's brought to my attention), and then use it as a lesson learned. I, too, was "brought up right". And, like you, "there is very little that would cause me enough angst to lose any sleep". But, unlike you, even a colonoscopy doesn't make me lose sleep. A grandchild in the hospital with pneumonia would, though.

Jun 11, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Please don't comb your hair, apply make-up, blow your nose. or pick your teeth at the table. Especially at a restaurant! Thanks.

A lady wouldn't. I think ALL grooming that is done in the preparation of making oneself presentable in public is demonstrating poor manners and a disrespect for her dining companions and herself. Restrooms are available to clip the chipped fingernail and tighten the chignon. And the excusing oneself from the table to do those functions should wait until the end of the meal -- providing the chignon isn't falling out into her soup.

Apr 24, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Please don't comb your hair, apply make-up, blow your nose. or pick your teeth at the table. Especially at a restaurant! Thanks.

I had worn the same fragrance for well over a decade and received a few complements on it. Then, during a phone call from a gentlemen for another date, he requested I NOT use that fragrance. I readily agreed but was curious as to his request. He hesitantly said to me, "Do you remember that little black and white animal we saw when we pulled up to my home in the country last week-end?" Of course, I knew exactly to what he was referring! We had already been out on at least three dates by then! He proved to me that he either 1) was a real gentlemen, or 2) he really, really liked me. It turned out that it was both. (blushing rising in my cheeks now) But it got me thinking, and the next work day I asked my employer with whom I worked physically close to at times if he was bothered by my fragrance. I wasn't going to take it for granted any more that everyone liked it just because I'd received compliments on it in the past. Thankfully my employer was not bothered by it, and in fact said he found it pleasant. Whew!

Apr 24, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Does anyone else consider this rude?

Well stated, latindancer.

Apr 24, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Does anyone else consider this rude?

Perhaps I read into your statement of "not losing any sleep over it". When I hear someone say that it means the same to me as saying that they can take a flying leap for all you care, which attitude denotes a deregard for other's feelings, disrespectful and is careless in my view. I apologize if I misinterpreted your intent. (It's so much easier to interpret a conversant's attitude face-to-face, but, hey, Skype this isn't!)

Apr 24, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Does anyone else consider this rude?

No one said manners should be reserved. And you're right about the derailing. I have to admit to my part in that.

Apr 24, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Does anyone else consider this rude?

I totally agree.

Apr 24, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Does anyone else consider this rude?

Non-comformity has its place. But it IS what can land someone involuntarily in the unemployment line. I believe that's the point jihinwa is making. Like he said, "Big brains alone do not equate to success."

Apr 24, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Does anyone else consider this rude?

So you're okay with representing yourself as an American barbarian rather than a sensitive American? We do, like it or not represent our country when we are in another. Hopefully there aren't too many who are okay with others seeing Americans as barbarians.

Apr 24, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Does anyone else consider this rude?

Much of using good manners IS a showing of respect, in my opinion. That is why I insisted my children say please, thank you and your welcome to family members, too. Good manners shouldn't just be reserved for friends and strangers.

Apr 24, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food
1

Does anyone else consider this rude?

I understand what you're saying. However, even the best math whiz had better not be uncouth if he wants to earn a living. That's just how it is, always has been and always will be. Granted, that is extreme, but I've observed many young people in public, including eating establishments, who don't seem to know that certain things aren't done in public. Hopefully they are just trying to show off to their friends. In reality, they are making fools of themselves.

Apr 24, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Does anyone else consider this rude?

I haven't seen any references to refusing to learn, either. I have seen a willingness to be a maverick insofar as common rules of society are concerned, coupled with an unmistakable pompousness, along with a condescending attitude toward those who choose to follow the basic rules of their particular business culture. THAT, imho, is more puzzling that one who would refuse to learn.

Apr 24, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food
1

Does anyone else consider this rude?

Exactly! That's what I've been trying to get MGZ to understand but he seems to be a maverick and does things his way or he'll take the highway. LOL Oh, well, at least someone other than myself understands the importance of good etiquette in the business world.

Apr 24, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Does anyone else consider this rude?

I do that, too. However, I've found that in your "better" restaurants, the lettuce is hand torn into bite size pieces for the regular-type lettuce salad.. I loooove that. At Appleby's, etc. and your Mom & Pop cafe, be prepared to cut your own lettuce once the salad is served.

Apr 23, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Does anyone else consider this rude?

That's funny, but I'm sure the business associate was terribly embarassed that he made you cry. He meant well but he happened upon the only 3 year old in the state that could cut up his/her own steak. BTW, I'm curious whether you cut it all up at one time, or 1 or 2 pieces at a time.

Apr 23, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food
1

Does anyone else consider this rude?

I agree. I think the formality comes in when your dining in a cloth napkin, multiple spoons and forks setting. However, I'd draw the line on talking with one's mouth full and dancing on the table in the ordinary family restaurant.

Apr 23, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Does anyone else consider this rude?

Having been in the legal field, too, I'm heartened you recognize the need for proper decorum in the courtroom. And just as there is proper decorum there, it exists in other places, too. Wouldn't you agree that if you refused to wear a tie to Court, your becoming a partner would have been very unlikely? Therefore, although you may be extremely good at what you do, you may have never seen the inside of a courtroom as an attorney. You did, however, agree to "succumb to the restrictions of others" in that case. Good luck in your continuing practice.

Apr 23, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Does anyone else consider this rude?

I hope your never turned down for a business promotion due to your lack of caring.

Apr 23, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Does anyone else consider this rude?

Because the customs are different in other countries and even in other regions of the USA, I was taught in an etiquettes class (They used to be taught in some schools that awarded business degrees.) to follow the lead of your host/hostess. If the occasion has many tables of guests and you can't very easily see your host/hostess, follow the lead of the person who is the most senior or with the "highest" title sitting at your table. If you don't know who that is, following the lead of the person you guess may be the oldest.

Many responses to your question scoff at the idea of using manners as set out by others. However, I know of a man who didn't get a promotion simply because his table manners weren't acceptable, and he would have been required to entertain clients in his new position. He was advised to take an etiquettes class, and after he had done so and proven (by his use of them at following business functions), his name would be at the top of the list for the next promotion to come about. Manners matter, people.

Apr 23, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food

Does anyone else consider this rude?

Perhaps it's just that she got into the habit of doing it when her children (you, for one) were too young to cut their own food. It may be interesting to ask her about it. I guess I don't understand what it means to grow "out of cutting all my food". I'm guessing that somewhere along the line you read or were told that grown-ups don't do that.

Apr 23, 2013
Pinky107 in Not About Food