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fatcat55jc's Profile

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How British People Eat

Yes a bit of everything loaded onto every fork-load - that's how we kids ate every supper meal. Formed the mashed potatoes into a nest, then piled veggies into the nest, not onto the bare plate itself, to maximize any gravy available (7 in our family). Kids instinctively know this makes eating easier, and very tasty. Scottish ancestry, by the way.

Dec 29, 2011
fatcat55jc in Features

A question about a copper frying pan

Pasting my post originally here http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/615965#

I've used every type of pan out there, Just plain physics, tin lined copper is the most efficient, thus the most responsive to application of heat, and to any changes in heat. Actually, the most reactive metal to heat is SILVER, then copper, Gold is actually less. Heat conductivity is measured in units with letter label of 'k'; Silver is 4.29, copper is 4.01, gold is 3.17, aluminum is 2.3, iron is way down there at 0.8 There's a zillion recipes for steel using a dozen elements, a typical conductivity for steel would be just under 2.0 I have several copper pieces lined with sterling silver and very much enjoy using them. Tin melts at 450 F, making that temp the upper limit for tin-lined copper. One CAN in fact use metal utensils with tin lined copper, just respectfully. Tin is NOT reactive to food ingredients, including acidic recipes -- unless you're cooking with full strength nitric acid -- so tin only needs re-lining if you somehow scrape it off through mis-use, or irresponsibly apply scorching heat to a dry pan. I have copper-tin pans 100+ years old with original tin intact. Just plain facts.

Jul 23, 2009
fatcat55jc in Cookware

How good is this set of knife ?

You're exactly right, Waltereo, too hard and you can't sharpen it yourself at home. Absolutely no way. So either buy another set of knives with harder steel (but why? you already have a set ! ) and pay for a professional to sharpen them, once a year maybe, or better yet, just enjoy the softer steel knives you already have, sharpen them yourself a bit more often. Sounds like you've done very well for yourself. All the best.

Jul 17, 2009
fatcat55jc in Cookware

Bamboo cutting board--too hard?

I use a 30x30x16H hard rock maple block held together by double dovetail joints, no glue. Over 100 years old, no cracking. now THAT's true sustainability. Pure food grade mineral oil to maintain the surface, keep it from drying out. Bamboo being grass provides abrasive velcro-like resistance to the knive edge, making cutting slower.

Jul 17, 2009
fatcat55jc in Cookware

Sharpening Global with Spyderco

I have collected perhaps a thousand knives and perform all my own sharpening on a Tormek rig out of Sweden. A sharp edge is a sharp edge, period, regardless of the blade contour. A convex grind is probably the strongest of all shapes since it retains the most metal near the edge. But that same characteristic also generates the most friction when cutting. Moran made more outdors knives, hunting knives you could say, than kitchen knives and hunting knives get rough use and must be durable, right? Thus the Moran edge. At the other extreme, the asian knife. with its single bevel, provides the most acute angle so the least resistance with cutting, also the most easily damaged if you abuse your knife. I prefer it. By the way, I employ the one-knife-kitchen philosophy of the old french chefs, its an asian knife.

Jul 17, 2009
fatcat55jc in Cookware

Copper vs. Copper Core

I've used every type of pan out there, Just plain physics, tin lined copper is the most efficient, thus the most responsive to application of heat, and to any changes in heat. The most reactive metal to heat is SILVER, then copper, Gold is actually less. Heat conductivity is measured in units with letter label of 'k'; Silver is 4.29, copper is 4.01, gold is 3.17, aluminum is 2.3, iron is way down there at 0.8 There's a zillion recipes for steel using a dozen elements, a typical conductivity for steel would be just under 2.0 I have several copper pieces lined with sterling silver and very much enjoy using them. Tin melts at 450 F, making that temp the upper limit for tin-lined copper. One CAN in fact use metal utensils with tin lined copper, just respectfully. Tin is NOT reactive to food ingredients -- unless you're cooking with full strength nitric acid -- so tin only needs re-lining if you somehow scrape it off through mis-use, or irresponsibly apply scorching heat to a dry pan. I have copper-tin pans 100+ years old with original tin intact. Just plain facts.

Jul 17, 2009
fatcat55jc in Cookware

Need to find a Molcajete for a gift, help!

Where do you live ? One hour north of Chicago in Racine WI, ask Racine Produce, specializing in Mexican produce of all kinds, and a very few kitchen eqpt items including large heavy authentic molcajetes. My molcajete is 12" dia x 6"H, at least 10 lbs. I think I paid $12 three or four yrs ago. This is a crudely hand crafted item, strong as a cement mixer, and the surface texture is coarse, so for finer mashing I use a granite mortar and pestle. You can find their phone # at any online phoone directory such as anywho.com

Dec 03, 2007
fatcat55jc in Cookware

To convection or not to convection, that is the question.

If you want crispy not rubbery skin on your roast turkey, convection !

Nov 14, 2007
fatcat55jc in Cookware

Tempered glass cutting boards OK for knives?

Bah! The manufacturer, wanting to sell cutting boards, is giving bad information. Not surprising - knifemakers also say it's OK to plop their knives in the dishwasher, but NO high quality knife should ever see the inside of a dishwater, either. Wood, and that plastic you describe, are the only suitable material for cutting boards. Cutting on any hard surface will damage your knife blade: granite, marble, ceramic or porcelain tile, Corian, formica, tempered glass etc. People adamantly claim differently, but plastic and wood (properly maintained) are identical from an antimicrobial standpoint, so take your pick. As for a good quality wood board splitting, it's probably over dry. Plunge your entire board into warm soapy water, dont let go of it, rinse and towel try promptly, then apply a thin coat of non toxic mineral oil every so often, It's a dollar or two for a quart at any drug store. Cutting boards are sacrificial items. They are meant to deteriorate over time and be replaced. If they were meant to stay pristine, we'd be carving, slicing, and chopping with abandon on our butcher block counter tops. When any two materials clash, something's gotta give. Ridges, cut marks in your board reassure you that your blade is not doing the surrendering. Every so often a board can be sanded smooth and then oiled as above. After tons of use and innumerable sandings, I suppose a board would need replacing, but not for a very long time.

Nov 14, 2007
fatcat55jc in Cookware