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Miyabi Evolution 8" Chef’s Knives

BTW. . .on the SLT website I asked about the spine width of the Evolution 8- and 10-inch chef knives. And they answered they were both 1/16 of an inch wide which equals 1.6 mm which makes a pretty thin knife (even if whoever did the measuring wasn't that accurate).

This, along with the sharpening angle and hardness, would suggest that the mystery steel is more Japanese style than German. And more in the style of the Fusion (and 600 D) than, say, the 600 S.

Jan 16, 2014
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

Miyabi Evolution 8" Chef’s Knives

Sur La Table answered my question about clarifying what angle the Miyabi Evolution knives are sharpened at. And guess what? The "22-24 degrees" refers to the included angle, NOT the edge angle. Which would make the edge angle 11-12 degrees. Wow.

Now if we could only find out what kind of actual steel the blades are made of (not Henckels made-up name), we'd be getting somewhere :)

Jan 11, 2014
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

Miyabi Evolution 8" Chef’s Knives

Did anybody ever confirm whether 22-24 degrees was the edge angle or the included angle on this puppy? I just left a question about it on the SLT website, so we shall see. But I'm guessing it has to be the included angle.

Has anybody taken it out for a test drive yet?

Jan 09, 2014
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

What is the best Chef Knife for the Professional?

You cracked me up. And I tend to believe truer words were never spoken. . . :)

Sep 11, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

Chai doa knife

What's nice about a Chai Dao, and a santoku as well, is that you get the width of a much longer blade (like a 10-inch chef's) without all the unwieldy length.

But it's not meant to be used to cut chickens in half, which I wouldn't do with a German chef's knife either. You'll dull your blade pronto and wonder why you can't cut red peppers the way you could just a day earlier. For the chicken I'd use a pair of quality kitchen shears. . .or a good old-fashioned cleaver :)

Sep 11, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

Electric knife sharpeners

I can understand the convenience factor of being able to sharpen your own knives--but please be aware that (like I mentioned above) with Chef's Choice diamond abrasive wheels, odds are you are grinding down your knives' edges must faster than necessary.

Jun 17, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

Do you let other people use your knives?

Funny. . .although I've found it's more the expertise and experience of the operator than the equipment. There are so-so manual sharpening services and so-so power sharpening services. Although a machine can do much more damage much more quickly than a whetstone. . . :)

May 19, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

Do you let other people use your knives?

That's painful to look at. . .

May 19, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

Do you let other people use your knives?

Knives are one of the oldest technologies on the earth, but it’s amazing how many of us are ignorant about how they function.

Some of you will chuckle, but I have a $10 chef knife in my knife block reserved for just this purpose. For guests. In my experience 9 out of 10 friends/acquaintances have no idea of how to handle a quality sharp knife. (And I live in Westchester, a fairly sophisticated locale.) They are liable to do anything with it—slice on steel or granite, or leave it lying at the bottom of the sink in a pool of water.

No, no, NO! :)

May 18, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

My wood cutting board smells. HELP!

For the record--I was just addressing the issue of taste and smell from garlic and onions getting into fruit. That's what the original post was concerned with--not contamination. Cutting board cleanliness is a whole different subject.

The simplest and least time consuming solution for cutting and eating fruit that doesn't taste of onion, etc. is to have a separate plastic board for fruit. If you want to wash the board with hot water and soap, that's fine, but it doesn't need anything more thorough than that! It's fruit--not chicken thighs :)

Apr 29, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

My wood cutting board smells. HELP!

Gosh. Who has the time to do all this board cleaning? I sure don't.

Just buy a plastic board (we have two--one small, one large) and in one corner, in very small print, label it "fruit." Obey the label and there will be no more garlic strawberry shortcake :)

Oneida and Dexas make boards in really fun colors and the quality of their plastic (not too hard) is perfect for knives.

Apr 28, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

Poultry Shears

Glad to hear you don't put your knives in the dishwasher. I can now sleep soundly. . .

Apr 28, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

Poultry Shears

Kuel. But please tell me you don't do that with your knives :)

Apr 27, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

Poultry Shears

Good to know. Thanks for sharing. . .and, currently, what a DEAL!

Apr 27, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

Poultry Shears

Sorry to be a nudge, but I wouldn't dishwasher them if I were you. It'll only give the edges of the blades unnecessary wear. . .

Apr 25, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

Poultry Shears

John--
How long have you had the Messermiester? Just curious to know how well they hold up. It's my biz to help recommend kitchen knives and other kitchen tools to others :)

Apr 25, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

Poultry Shears

Shears are definitely the best solution for crunching through chicken carcasses. As long as the shears are well-made you shouldn't have a problem. Shears offer so much more exactness and control than hacking with a cleaver (unless you're seriously trained). And they're safer, too.

I've heard Messermiester makes a terrific pair of shears. They're a top-knotch German knife manufacturer, not as big and as well-known as Wustohof, but just as high quality.

Good luck!

Apr 24, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

mail order sharpening

I'm guessing that jefpen2 is probably talking about a bolster reduction, NOT removal. But good to clarify :)

Apr 07, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

mail order sharpening

Out of curiosity, I took a glance at the Steve Bottorff list. While it is a nice long list, there is something to be said for 1) screening for quality and 2) being up-to-date:
- I've used a service on his list that I would not send my knives to again
- Bob Kramer does not sharpen knives anymore and hasn't for quite a few years
:)

Apr 04, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

mail order sharpening

It's a pretty standard problem with knives that have been sharpened a lot. So don't be dismayed. I think I had it done with a Henckels I sent out. Any high-quality sharpening service should be able to handle it, so you should be able to find a solution :)

Apr 04, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

Knife Trouble. Sharp, but no edge??

What a rich and hilarious and obsessive story. But what's the ending? Did you ever get your knife fixed? Ever get it back to normal?

Apr 01, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

Electric knife sharpeners

This is probably a moot issue since this post is a year old, but, for the record, there three general problems with electric knife sharpeners like Chef's choice and ilk:
1) because they're using a diamond abrasive and running very fast with no speed control, they tend to wear off more metal on your knives than is necessary, thus wearing them down sooner
2) they offer little or no options to customizing the bevel angle and depth for each knife
3) they have a hard time with knives with bolsters and after repeated use, end up notching the heel of the blade.

If you happen to be like me, and desire sharp knives but just don't have the time to master sharpening them yourself on a stone, I highly recommend using a quality knife sharpening service. And THEN, and this is just about as important (and much much easier than learning how to sharpen), learn how to hone/steel your knives regularly.

I have used three sharpening services that I like and I've reviewed them in depth on my website. They are: Seattle Knife Sharpening, D&R Sharpening Solutions, JustKnives101.

Good luck!

Apr 01, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

All Clad knives

This knife looks like a great deal to me! And it's not just a pretty face. Also, my impression is that the custom handle is especially well designed, and more comfortable than the traditional D.

Mar 08, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

All Clad knives

Love the Ben Franklin quote (and it rings so true), but sounds to good to be actually said by him. I wonder if there's a way to track down the source. . . :)

Mar 08, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

All Clad knives

For what it's worth, the guy at zKnives.com has run some pretty thorough reviews on some Miyabis. You might find it helpful and informative to peruse. It's funny you find the Miyabi's thick, because he comments on how thin they are. (And he, like you, is an aficionado of Japanese knives!)

Mar 08, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

All Clad knives

My understanding is that, although the type of steel is important (especially as far as HRC hardness is concerned), the way it's been heated-treated can be equally important. It's the whole package!

Designing and manufacturing the steel for a knife blade is a serious biz. Even Henckels, behemoth that they are, when they entered the Japanese knife market bought an established Japanese knifemaker in the city of Seki, a knifemaking capital of the world. They worked closely with a major Japanese chef to give it credentials. The result--Miyabi.

Mar 07, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

All Clad knives

I don’t quite understand why you would consider Wusthof and All-Clad knives homogeneous, especially as far their blades are concerned. The quality of a decent blade is a knife’s most important element, and probably the most expensive aspect to produce. Wusthof, a family-owned business, has been making knife blades since 1814—over 150 years before All Clad even existed. All Clad only started “making” knives last September. Don’t you think that counts for something?

My concern is that All-Clad is getting the steel (and maybe even roughly-hewed blades) from China, and then finishing the knives in the US and, thus, calling them US made. They are very cagey, fuzzy, and restrained in their descriptions about how the knives are made. Oh, the composition is proprietary. . .so now they think they’re Henckels. Where are the concrete credentials? Who’s doing quality control of the steel and the design and standing behind it? All Clad? Where’s the factory where the knives are being made? If their knives have so much quality going into them, why don’t they give us more details?

Please don’t get me wrong, I don’t have anything invested in this. If you love the look of the knives, go out and buy them! Their fit and finish are beautiful and definitely match the established brands. But I wouldn’t automatically assume their blades (and steel) will match the quality of other brands that have a lot more experience making knives. They might. . .they might not. . . :)

Mar 06, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware

All Clad knives

Ditto, Chemicalkinetics comment. But a few things to add:

- All-Clad has a great reputation in pots and pans. I swear by the ones I've had for 30 or more years. So, knowing this, these knives might be quite decent.

- Knives are a very different product than pots and pans. And I'm always suspicious when a knifemaker is as skimpy on info as All Clad's is about these knives. They're asking you to pay $150 for an 8-inch chef for heaven's sake and that's all they're going to say? But they do say a lot about "USA made" and that is what they are banking on.

- There are quite a few other knives in this price range from major brands that are going to be a sure thing--products you can know more about and that have more of a track record. Why should you bother risking on a unknown quantity?

- It's the handsome natural-wood handles, isn't it? They are great looking! But looks won't keep you going when you end up having to sharpen the blades all the time because they won't hold a decent edge.

- Here are a couple of suggestions of other more unusual-looking knives you may not know about. Both are more expensive, but sport beautiful natural-wood handles and are high-quality with a proven reputation:

1) Wüsthof Ikon Blackwood Knives:

http://www.cutleryandmore.com/wusthof/ikon-blackwood.htm

2) Wüsthof Epicure Knives:

http://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO...

Have fun learning more about knives!

Mar 04, 2013
kitchenknifeguru in Cookware