SuzieMae's Profile

Title Last Reply

Another Brazilian Ingredient Question - Baroa Potatoes (Batata Baroa)

Discovery! They are Arracacia xanthorrhiza. Also known in English as Peruvian Parsnips.

Nov 19, 2007
SuzieMae in General Topics

Brazilian Ingredients

There are not exact equivalents in Brazilian and American butchery. The Sirloin (the whole big sirloin) is the picanha, the maminha and the alcatra cuts all together. Contra Filet is the rib (the rib side of the T-Bone is a contra filet steak). Lombo is a term not often used for beef. It is the contra filet of pork (the loin attached to the rib). American butchers do not cut the whole picanha. They cut across it to make top sirloin steaks. The Maminha is the tri-tip and the alcatra is a whole round up of various new york and other very fine sirloin steaks. Brazilian butchers butcher meat for you on the spot. You would rarely see styrofoam trays of meat precut and wrapped in plastic. Only very large supermarkets would offer ready cut meat as an option for convenience, but still have a butcher counter with butchers cutting to order. (Isn't Brazil great!).

Nov 18, 2007
SuzieMae in General Topics

Another Brazilian Ingredient Question - Baroa Potatoes (Batata Baroa)

What a pity. The flavor is that of a regular spud that married a macadamia nut. They are very starchy, buttery and nutty. They are dry so they make excellent gnocchi. Their starchiness really comes out when you mash them. It looks as if you could use them as grout for bricks. They absorb so much more milk and butter and give a great texture when using a handmixer. And they're golden! They look like you've added a touch of saffron. I will later send a picture.
It is a great sadness that they have not arrived in the States yet.

Nov 13, 2007
SuzieMae in General Topics

Another Brazilian Ingredient Question - Baroa Potatoes (Batata Baroa)

Do you all find baroa potatoes (batata baroa) in the States? - Suzie in Brazil

Nov 12, 2007
SuzieMae in General Topics

Brazilian Ingredients

I am writing a book about Brazilian cooking for an American audience. I live in Brazilan am having a hard time confirming if these ingredients would be easy for Americans to find. If anyone could help out. I'd like to know if you can find manioc flour; in this I mean the coarse flour used for making farofa. I am also looking for the manioc flour that is ground into powder (polvilho - azedo and doce) to make things like pão de queijo and biscoitos de polvilho.

I also wonder if the cut "picanha" is available. I think that it may be found in latino butcher shops by the name "tapa de cuadril". If anyone can give me a hand, thanks for the comments...

Nov 12, 2007
SuzieMae in General Topics

Recommend some delicious Argentine wine

A fantastic different white (breaking the Chardonnay habit) is the Viognier from Altas Cumbres. It is not expensive ( I pay $21 reais = ten bucks) and it is fruitty, well-bodied, 14% alcohol. It ihas storng notes of just ripe peach or honeydew melon. I serve it with richer fish dishes (bacalhau), chicken is a very seasoned sauce, spicier pasta dishes, as an opener with a terrine or sliced prosciutto. It is a great contrast to a lightler wine, such as a Sauvignon Blanc (Tarapacá, Chile) or Pinto Grigio (Miolo, Brazil). I have started a meal with the lighter, then moved to the Viognier with great satisfaction.
This is a reasonably priced wine that I drink once a week. For something a bit more expensive, explore the wines of Perdriel, Familia Zucchardi, Doña Paula and Angelica Zapata. Cheers!

Best Coffee Houses in South America?

Look for San Telmo or Colombo while in large cities in Brazil. I think San Telmo is from Argentina so look for them there too.

Looking for special dinner out in Rio

There is no better than L'Olympe in Jardim Botanico. Go to http://www.claudetroisgros.com.br/ to see the menu and make reservations. Le Saint Honoré is also excellent. These two restaurants will set you back a pretty penny but these are some of the best restaurants in the world. L'osteria del Angulo is an excellent Italian mid-price option. Antiquarius is an instituion also not to be missed if you're into bacalhau. I am not a fan of Gero or any of the Fasano chain. They are very expensive and snooty, but lacking in quality - very down thei nose attitude. Happy dining - Suzie in Teresopolis, RJ

Eating in Sao Paulo, Brazil

I lived in Sao Paulo for a few years. The best pizza on the planet (and I've had NY and Napolitano) is from Braz in Sao Paulo. Rua Grauna in Moema. Truly phenomenal pizza. For great churrasco go to Fogo de Chão (same as on La Cienega). It is the real deal. Jardineira is good too. There are a million great reastaurants in SP. Don't forget to visit the bakeries, I like Santa Marcelina in Brooklyn (SP). Also the great market in the center of the city is an incredible experience. Sao Paulo is a big ugly city, sort of a Bladerunnerish experience. But I found paulistas extremely warm and helpful, especially when talking about food!