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Didee's Duck recipe

Didee's is currently closed, but not "for years" and, depending on Perrodin family members it is apt to open again anytime (family resturants have after all been open since the late 18 hundreds). No, Brigtsens duck doesnt come close, not at all! I ate Didees duck for lunch and dinner for most of 4 years and have eaten Brigtsens duck on at least 10 occasions. The all day slow roasting with steam table, then broiler treatment caused the most crispy skin Ive encountered with duckling. The glaze on the royal duck was nothing unusua, however. What made Didees duck special was the tenderness of the meat rendered totally fatless and the texture of the skin. See asian recipes where duck is first boiled, then fire roasted, and finally baked to appreciate the effect such slow treatments have on the final texture and flavor of duck.

Nov 19, 2007
clebla in New Orleans

shish-kabob house in Kenner

I agree in part. The place is usually empty but the food and willingness to accommodate are are good. But I disagree in the respect that cafe Lebanon is better. I find Cafe Lebenon no better in terms of food- some dishes are better here then there and vice versa, but there are no big differences in terms of quality.

Nov 19, 2007
clebla in New Orleans

Didee's Duck recipe

Hi, I just read the Advocate recipe, and looked at the one Herman Perrodin used when on the The John Folse show. As somone that worked in the Tiger Bend resturant for 4 years, I can tell you with complete certainty that neither of these recipes is accurate. The spices were different (i.e. NO poultry seasoning or pickling spice). The spice used was a kitchen blend I watched Mark, the head cook at that version of Didee's, and on occasion Herman, mix up many, many times. Also, the galze was altered quite a bit from what I saw prepared. Im assuming Herman wanted to keep the family recipe to himself- hell that recipe has kept his family fed for a over hundred years. Also absent from the recipes was the fact that the ducks were marinated overnight in a mix of fruit juice and the kitchen spice mix minus most of the salt used when roasting. After marinating, neck and cavity fat was trimmed, ducks were rubbed inside and out with liberal amounts of the spice mix, and then were slow roasted- the times in the ovens for both of these recipes were way way too short from my recollection. Ducks went in the oven early on sunday, around 10 AM, then roasting for most of the day on low heat. One thing I was told was critical to the flavor and texture of Didee's duck was the slow roasting, regular basting with pan drippings, and repeatedly pricking the skin at spots where the fat had begun to melt. Once the slow roasting was complete, ducks were allowed to cool, cut into quarters or halves, and placed in a shallow pan. Drippings minus most of the fat were then poured over the ducks and they went into the cooler til use. Typically a pan was returned to a steam table on low heat around 10 AM before the resturant opened and simmered til an order was placed. This added hours more cooking time. The mix of roasting and low simmering removed absolutely all of the fat. Many resturants peel off the fat, and this leads to a less crispy skin- yuck! Duck that had been simmering was then placed on a broiling pan and glazed with a plum, apricot, and cherry glaze or not depending on the order, and broiled at high heat for a few minutes to get that skin just perfectly crispy. I know the recipe for the marinade and spice mix. Many substitutions can be made to get a similar flavor, but if you're willing to sell your mama, Ill share it-maybe! Ill ask Herman's son Charles if it would get anyone angry first though. Ducks at the resturant were served with a duck giblet dirty rice-the Folse version of the recipe is OK- and a spiced pear with toasted coconut drizzled over the top.

Nov 11, 2007
clebla in New Orleans