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Ham Stock

Down to two bags of stock after making soups for three months. It was great in bean soup, pea soup, and added a great depth to potato soup as well. A bit went into some veggie noodle soup, and a bit went to make a glaze for meatloaf a few weeks back.

As I mentioned to Kaleo, the Easter ham is going into the pot this weekend so I'll have more stock. It's amazing how good it tastes. Just a few spoonfuls in the batter adds a bacony flavor to my skillet cornbread without using bacon fat. Going to experiment a little and see if I can come up with a light dressing for summer salads using the stock as well.

Pressure cooking for stock is a great idea! Especially when keeping a regular supply of stock on hand.

Apr 02, 2013
tippau in Home Cooking

Ham Stock

Making the ham stock was totally worth it! You're so right about the hamhocks and theham base from the grocery stores. They can't hold a candle to the real ham stock. It tastes amazing and it freezes so well. The remains of the Easter ham are in the freezer now; It's going into the pot with a bunch of left over veggies this weekend. :D

Apr 02, 2013
tippau in Home Cooking

Ham Stock

Yes, it sure is handy. And no franken-ingredients. The Thanksgiving turkey provided five quarts of stock; no added seasonings or veggies there either. Homemade stock tastes sooooo gooooood!

Jan 04, 2013
tippau in Home Cooking

Ham Stock

No hocks. Started with the leftover holiday ham, bone and drippings. Made the stock, packaged it up and froze it. So for soup I'm starting with ham stock-just ham, no veggies or seasonings went into the pot to make the stock. So I guess it's actually ham juice. :D

While trying to refresh my memory on making my grandmother's soup, I kept coming across recipes which started with hocks or a bone rather than ham stock. That's great if the ham is being used specifically for the soup, but that's not my starting point. Seeing so many recipes which start with the ham hocks or bone in the soup made me wonder if I was remembering my grandmother's technique incorrectly.

But thanks to the folks here, it's clear that I'm not. It's just much more common to start with the meat/bone than to make ham stock, freeze it, and use it in soups at later dates.

Jan 04, 2013
tippau in Home Cooking

Ham Stock

It's like making chicken or turkey stock; it's made then frozen in batches for later use. My grandmother used the stock to flavor everything from cornbread to collards, made gravies and dips. The ham stock is an ingredient that just hangs out in the freezer till needed. :D

Jan 03, 2013
tippau in Home Cooking

Ham Stock

The stock is from the Christmas ham. Bone, meat, pan drippings, the whole shebang.

Jan 03, 2013
tippau in Home Cooking

Ham Stock

Excellent! Thank you everyone. :D

Jan 03, 2013
tippau in Home Cooking

Ham Stock

Hi all!
This is my first post, tho I've been following Chowhound for a while. You folks are a wealth of knowledge, and I'm hoping you can help me with a question.

Last weekend I made ham stock, no veggies or seasonings, just boiled ham juice. It's beautiful and flavorful and froze with no issues. I have 22 cups of this lovely liquid, and planned on making my grandmother's pea soup and bean soup over the next few months. Problem is that I'm working from memory and can't recall how she actually used the liquid in the soups!

I *think* the stock was used in place of the water to form the base of the soup, after the peas or beans were soaked in plain water. Heat stock, add hydrated beans, add sweated carrots and onion, season. After watching countless videos and reading countless recipes online, I'm stumped tho. Almost every one calls for boiling the ham (hock) and adding it to the soup but leaving the ham water out. Do you suppose this is because most people don't have ham stock on hand?

Has anyone ever heard of using ham stock as the actual liquid in bean or pea soup, or have I lost my mind? It's been some 20 years since I've made either of these soups, so my memory may be off. Any insight would be greatly appreciated!

Jan 03, 2013
tippau in Home Cooking