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Sauciére or Windsor shape? I just gotta know.

Thanks fourunder. Yup, I'm tending towards the Falk try me and if I'm happy getting the 9.5" 3 qt. too.

Apr 06, 2013
tjohn in Cookware

Losing faith in cast iron cookware

Gee, as long as the difference between a $20 CI frypan and a nice copper one for $275 isn't an issue I'd go for copper. Although it sounds a bit like you may have been using higher levels of heat than you need, even for CI. I have copper and stainless, and still have two pieces of CI that I would not part with.

Apr 06, 2013
tjohn in Cookware

Sauciére or Windsor shape? I just gotta know.

I'm trying to decide on the style for two copper pans. Either the Sauciére shape from Falk or Matfer Bourgeat, or the classic straight side Windsor from Mauviel (all stainless lined). I have no experience with either shape. I'm considering Mauviel tin-lined but I believe that the new stuff available in America is under 2mm (rounding up 1.6-1.8mm to 2 even, with no decimal). Two pans in smaller sizes as I mostly cook for myself (16 & 24mm). Two thoughts: tin is not so happy with metal whisks, and a curved corner should be much friendlier to the usual metal whisks than the classic Windsor.

So what do you think about the curved corner, and about tin vs stainless?
(Please, not trying to start religious wars).

Apr 06, 2013
tjohn in Cookware

Mauviel M150 skillet vs All Clad tri-ply (aluminum)

Also depends on the size of the fry pan and your hob's heat distribution. I have an 8.6" M150c that work's fine on my Chambers' gas burners - they're four "floret" burners in a square and make for pretty even heat as opposed to a single ring-style burner. I don't believe that I would go with the thinner copper for a larger pan - 11" or 13."

Dec 27, 2012
tjohn in Cookware

Canned Tuna?

Thanks ferret, but my solid white albacore goes on top of salads. I just miss the inexpensive chunk non-white tuna that had real chunks you had to break apart with a fork to make tuna "salad" sandwiches. I'm not wasting my pricey albacore on pickle relish, minced onion and mayo ;-)

Dec 27, 2012
tjohn in General Topics

Canned Tuna?

Sorry, I'm duplicating the post I made under "best canned tuna" as it seems even more appropriate here - and I don't know how to do links.

I've been trying to figure out what happened to the canned tuna of my youth - while reading all the spew about every single major vendor of tinned tuna. It is all watery mush - shredded tuna.

I found the answer at the procedures at the FDA to determine what can be called "chunk" tuna.

The bottom line is that the canners are allowed to compress the contents of a can of tuna with a hydraulic press to a pressure of 384 pounds per square inch for one minute. As we all squeeze the water out over the sink by cutting the lid free and squeezing with our fingers - all we need to do to duplicate the canner is to press the lid of a typical 5 oz tin with around 1 1/2 tons of pressure - 3322.27 pounds to be precise. Say the entire weight of your compact car all concentrated on that little 3 1/4" lid.

With these specification they could make "chunk" tuna out of dehydrated tuna POWDER!

There is no "best canned tuna."

FYI:
[Code of Federal Regulations]
[Title 21, Volume 2]
[Revised as of April 1, 2012]
[CITE: 21CFR161.190]
TITLE 21--FOOD AND DRUGS
CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

SUBCHAPTER B--FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION

PART 161 -- FISH AND SHELLFISH

Subpart B--Requirements for Specific Standardized Fish and Shellfish Sec. 161.190 Canned tuna.

Dec 26, 2012
tjohn in General Topics

Best Canned Tuna?

I've been trying to figure out what happened to the canned tuna of my youth - while reading all the spew about every single major vendor of tinned tuna. It is all watery mush - shredded tuna.

I found the answer at the procedures at the FDA to determine what can be called "chunk" tuna.

The bottom line is that the canners are allowed to compress the contents of a can of tuna with a hydraulic press to a pressure of 384 pounds per square inch for one minute. As we all squeeze the water out over the sink by cutting the lid free and squeezing with our fingers - all we need to do to duplicate the canner is to press the lid of a typical 5 oz tin with around 1 1/2 tons of pressure - 3322.27 pounds to be precise. Say the entire weight of your compact car all concentrated on that little 3 1/4" lid.

With these specification they could make "chunk" tuna out of dehydrated tuna POWDER!

There is no "best canned tuna."

FYI:
[Code of Federal Regulations]
[Title 21, Volume 2]
[Revised as of April 1, 2012]
[CITE: 21CFR161.190]
TITLE 21--FOOD AND DRUGS
CHAPTER I--FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

SUBCHAPTER B--FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION

PART 161 -- FISH AND SHELLFISH

Subpart B--Requirements for Specific Standardized Fish and Shellfish Sec. 161.190 Canned tuna.

Dec 26, 2012
tjohn in General Topics