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Late night dining in the 10th

Dear all:

I arrived on the 22nd but my flight was already very much delayed as a consequence of the planned strike. Long story short -- I was too late even for vielleanglaise or John Talbott's late-night suggestions in the 10th, and ended up having a 1 am meal at Chez Denise. Thanks very much for the great recs.

Sep 24, 2010
ssusu in France

Late night dining in the 10th

Thank you both for the responses.

I arrive this Wednesday (day after tomorrow), sorry for not specifying in my earlier post. La Vigne St-Laurent sounds perfect. Top Table claims they stop seating at 10 pm but I will try telephoning them to see if they'll serve us later.

Vielleanglaise, do you mean Plomb du Cantal? I have been to l'Ambassade d'Auvergne, so I know what you mean about the stick-to-your ribs fare.

Any thoughts on l'Atmosphere?

Sep 20, 2010
ssusu in France

Late night dining in the 10th

We will of course venture out of the 10th if necessary -- my own googling has not been promising in this regard ... and I was told last week, when I tried to book, that Chez L'Ami Jean is booked with a private party or some such.

Suggestions welcome! Would like to avoid a depressingly mediocre brasserie dinner if at all possible.

Sep 20, 2010
ssusu in France

Late night dining in the 10th

Dear Paris 'hounds,

A friend and I are arriving in Paris on a 10.30 pm flight that should -- with any luck -- have us ready to dine at 11.30 p.m. Do any of you savvy Paris-dwellers have recommendations for restaurants or bistros in the 10th for a delightful late-night dinner? We'd prefer a french restaurant, as I used to live in Paris and have been going through withdrawals ever since I left ... (I've seen John Talbott's excellent guide, but am not sure which of the several restaurants he recommends might be able to accommodate us for a 11.30 seating.)

Thank you!

Sep 20, 2010
ssusu in France

Recs for SF dinner a deux

In searching on this board, I tried to look for places that (1) were not huge, (2) were receiving reliably consistent favorable reviews, (3) had a good wine list, and (4) were doing something exciting or (just delicious) with their food. Does that help? And are there other restaurants you think I should consider?

Jul 13, 2009
ssusu in San Francisco Bay Area

Recs for SF dinner a deux

Hi SF Bayers:

A friend and I will be in SF and are looking for suggestions for a single meal. We are both pretty hardcore foodies who dine out frequently and everywhere. We'd prefer small and intimate to large and corporate. Money is not exactly no object but we're willing to indulge ourselves if that's what it takes. A good wine list is a plus. We will not have a car so within San Francisco rather than E Bay is preferable.

Based on my research on this and other boards, I've come up with the following potential candidates, but would love other recs and feedback:

1550 Hyde
SPQR
Ame
Gitane

Thanks so much! (I promise to report back.)

Jul 13, 2009
ssusu in San Francisco Bay Area

Insider's Seattle - best of the best for dinner a deux

Sorry if I created the wrong impression. EV doesn't care, and will be happy to be here -- it is I who want to take EV for a Seattle fine dining experience. Elemental is a good suggestion, if the dates/timing work out.

Jun 12, 2009
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Insider's Seattle - best of the best for dinner a deux

I'm planning to take EV to Green Leaf, at least for lunch, but re fine dining, I don't think Europe vs. Seattle is a win-lose situation. Someone who takes pleasure in well-prepared food made with good, fresh ingredients will enjoy Seattle's great restaurants even if Michelin starred chefs are not cooking there.

I've heard Crush has had staffing problems that have caused some inconsistencies in the food and service. Certainly, my last experience there was not my favorite...

The "hypothetical" dinner will likely take place in early July. Soon enough for Mistral kitchen?

Jun 12, 2009
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Insider's Seattle - best of the best for dinner a deux

Hello hounds:

I'm hoping for your best insight on the following hypothetical:

Imagine long-time Seattle resident and serious foodie (that would be me, but could be you) anticipating a single meal with a "friend" in town for a short visit (we'll call this person "European visitor"). Imagine that this sybarite dines out frequently and well in London, Paris, and New York. Imagine that you want to take EV out for a meal at a restaurant that is not necessarily romantic, but perhaps small and intimate, that measures up to some of the really great restaurants to which EV is accustomed (think Petrus, Spring, WD-50). Imagine, further, that money is no, or little object. A great wine list is a plus.

Mistral would have been the obvious choice, but with with Mistral closed I'm at a loss. Matt's in the Market is noisy and can be a little rushed, and lately I've found it inconsistent. I'm thinking perhaps Harvest Vine, perhaps Tilth, perhaps Crush, but I haven't hit upon the choice that feels right for the occasion.

Thanks in advance for your thoughts!

Jun 12, 2009
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Third Annual Ultimate Seattle Restaurant Poll (2008)

1. Tilth
2. Harvest Vine
3. Szechuan Chef
4. Spinasse
5. Quinn's

Dec 24, 2008
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Paris - Unique, memorable, and not wildly expensive?

Aux Lyonnais was highly recommended by a reviewer I trust -- Mark Bittman, of the NY Times -- but so was Chez Denise. Sooooo.... should I substitute Aux Lyonnais with Chez Denise? I have a reservation but it's far enough off that I could probably cancel & still get one at Chez Denise.

Oct 09, 2008
ssusu in France

Paris - Unique, memorable, and not wildly expensive?

I am intrigued to learn what you mean by "lack of sincerity"...

Oct 09, 2008
ssusu in France

Paris - Unique, memorable, and not wildly expensive?

Thank you all so much for your responses. My dinner at le Salon d'Helene is tonight and I will definitely report back. I'm pretty sure Le Temps au Temps is still open, although Delucacheesemonger is correct that the chef has changed. Most reports I read said the new chef was carrying on with the stellar cuisine of the old, and I am disappointed to hear otherwise. I was there once this spring and liked but did not love it. A friend from the Bay Area has her heart set on trying it, so I believe we will end up there even though my preference would be otherwise. Am thrilled for the "great offal" at Aux Lyonnais.

Has anyone tried le Gaigne in le Marais?

Oct 09, 2008
ssusu in France

Paris - Unique, memorable, and not wildly expensive?

I'm living temporarily in Paris and am entertaining many visitors. I've done exhaustive research on this and other boards regarding dining options. Currently on my itinerary are the following restaurants:

- Le Temps au Temps
- La Regalade
- Aux Lyonnais
- Le Salon d'Helene

I love ethnic food and will probably try Dilan, Monsouria, and Al Ajami as well.

However ... I'm looking for a special and memorable restaurant for a dinner a deux for someone special who will be with me for only one night. My budget is somewhat limited (I can probably afford no more than 100 euros pp, including wine, and this would be a splurge for me) -- which eliminates most two-starred and many one-starred restaurants. I'd like to avoid something that feels too sleek, trendy, or rushed -- but I'm a former chef and do not necessarily need something "safe." A good wine list is a plus. My research has turned up the following possibilities, on which I'd love feedback, as it seems many people have strong negative or positive feelings about these restaurants:

- le Chateaubriand
- Mon Vieil Ami
- L'Ami Jean
- Drouant
- Gaya
- Chez Denise
- L'Os a Moelle (I've heard this has gone downhill)

I definitely welcome other suggestions! There's a certain point at which one's own research is of limited utility... For what it's worth, I speak French and am staying in the 12th, although obviously will travel anywhere.

Thank you all in advance.

Oct 08, 2008
ssusu in France

Seattle CSA?

Now that the Pike Place Market CSA has been discontinued, does anyone have a favorite local CSA?

Thanks.

May 24, 2008
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Favorite fishmonger in Pike Place Market?

Whoops -- I don't know how I missed that thread. Thank you.

Jan 29, 2008
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Favorite fishmonger in Pike Place Market?

Who's yours? And why?

Jan 29, 2008
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Theo Chocolate. In bulk! What a steal! (SEA)

So, if you're as much of a chocolate freak as I am (i.e., need to consume it daily), and as foolishly proud as I to have our Very Own Seattle manufacturer and purveyor of single-origin, organic, fairly-traded chocolate, you'll be glad to learn what I discovered this weekend when I brought out-of-town friends on a Theo Chocolate Factory tour: at the factory they sell bulk "seconds" -- i.e., not chocolate that's bloomed, but chocolate that's been poured too thick or too thin for their bar chocolate -- in bulk. Only $15 a pound!

They certainly don't advertise this, though, it's only available at the factory in Fremont, and I'm not sure how long it'll continue. (I learned about it when I spotted neatly-stacked boxes of chocolate in ziplock bags in the wrapping room.) Three pounds of chocolate later and $45 plus tax poorer, I'm now happily munching on single origin Madagascar bars, nib brittle, and the Panama/Ghana/Ecuador blend. What a deal.

Nov 14, 2007
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Joule (SEA)

Thanks for the review ... I'm going Sunday.

Nov 09, 2007
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Hebberoy Factor SEA

I like Michael, and have been to a number of the One Pot dinners and enjoyed them. They're worth checking out. He explains the concepts at the One Pot website: www.onepot.org.

Nov 08, 2007
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Quinn's, Capitol Hill, Seattle

It's 1001 East Pike, next to Cafe Vita and across from Neumo's.

Oct 30, 2007
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Quinn's, Capitol Hill, Seattle

I tried Quinn's today and can relay the following report/impressions:

-- overall, the food was excellent. We tried: the soft-boiled duck egg with boquerones, the cheese gougeres, the pear/stilton/frisee salad, the duck & duck rillettes, the braised oxtail/gnocchi/crispy marrow, the wild boar "sloppy joe" with crispy sage and onions, the smoked hangar steak & frites, and the green bean/pickled onion/radish side. I think the biggest surprise was that I did not expect this to be a small plates restaurant -- this made the prices seem like less of a good value than I had expected initially from scanning the menu. None of the "plates" would stand alone as an entree (N.B. I did not try the 8 oz. burger (there's always time for burgers)) and for three of us, the food we ordered was maybe just barely enough. The clear standout was the oxtail -- the meat was rich, flavorful, and thoughtfully prepared, the gnocchi were light and delicate, and the marrow -- a thick round balanced on the top of the dish -- was lightly crisped, perfectly salted, a marvel of cholesterol-laden, umami goodness. The salad was excellent. We couldn't figure out what the two "ducks" were in the "duck & duck" rillette -- it seemed like just a duck rillette, served traditionally with grilled bread and pickled red onions. The green beans, even at $6, were a small portion for the value and cost to the kitchen, and the duck egg - a single egg split with a single sliced boquerone carefully partitioned over each half -- was pricey even at $5. The hangar steak and frites was delicious but again small (I couldn't help comparing the similarly-priced entrees at Le Pichet). The "sloppy joe" was a generous portion of ground boar served open-faced on a sesame seed bun with crispy fried sage, thinly-sliced deep-fried onions, and a deep-fried jalapeno on top. Of all of these, only the oxtail was something I'd return for, but all of the items made me eager to try the rest of the menu.

-- The space is gorgeous and feels like it's been there forever. Instantly comfortable, reasonably good acoustics, casual but not thrown together.

-- The cocktails -- both the specialty cocktails and the cocktails we had when we sat down, were extremely good and pleasingly strong. The specialty list offered a nice take on some classics without pretension.

-- The service was friendly and overall decent, although occasionally, as it got busy, it became difficult to get second drinks. This could have something to do with the fact that the restaurant is not even a week old.

As a long-time, cranky Capitol Hill resident, it's nice to have a destination restaurant for food right on the Hill -- I hope Quinn's stays friendly and low-key.

Oct 30, 2007
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Gastropubs in Seattle

Rumor has it that Scott Staples of Zoe is opening (has opened? I haven't been keeping track) a gastropub in the Capitol Hill area called Quinn's. Sounds like it might be what you are looking for. http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/food/33...

Oct 04, 2007
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Seattle top restaurnts

Another vote for Harvest Vine.

Sep 05, 2007
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Seattle B-day Dinner for 7

How about Tavolata or Black Bottle? I don't think Tavolata takes reservations but I've never waited longer than 30-45 minutes to be seated. Black Bottle certainly takes reservations and all of the dishes are moderately priced ($9) and intended to be shared.

Sep 04, 2007
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Seattle's Best Sandwiches

Add to this list the hazelnut crusted chicken sandwich at Skillet (see my post about Skillet on this board).

Aug 23, 2007
ssusu in Greater Seattle

Skillet! (SEA)

I read about this nomadic breakfast/lunch/sandwich joint run by Two Young Chefs with a Vision in the Seattle Weekly's food blog yesterday and I had to try it immediately. Skillet serves food out of an Airstream trailer and its daily location is easily found through its GPS locator.

We went for lunch today (their second day in business) and had the kobe beef sliders (dressed with blue cheese and bacon marmalade), the hazelnut crusted chicken sandwich (dressed with fennel slaw), the poutin (basically, french fries with cheese and gravy), and the dessert - peaches cooked in a (wait for it....) skillet served with granola and sweet cream. The sandwiches are a wee bit on the spendy side ($8 for my hazelnut chicken, $9.50 for 2 sliders with fries) but absolutely, totally, delightfully worth it. Their hours are 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. (but check their website to make sure they're open when you want to go -- both owners are juggling full-time jobs in addition to this, their passion). Breakfast sounds orgasmically good (I dimly remember something involving a waffle, braised pork belly, and maple syrup -- then my ears started ringing and I was deafened by food lust).

Everything is sourced locally, made to order, and served in environmentally-friendly containers made from sugar cane.

Here is a link to their website: http://www.skilletstreetfood.com/

Aug 23, 2007
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

(SEA) Made in Kitchen

It's not my favorite Vietnamese restaurant in Seattle by a long shot (although I guess I'd give them a B+ for effort). The food was decent but not exceptional (for example, the imperial rolls were good, the green papaya salad overly sweet and underspiced, and the catfish in clay pot overwhelmed by the thick caramel sauce). Service was uneven. Given the wealth of excellent Vietnamese restaurants in Seattle, I doubt I'll go back.

Aug 21, 2007
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Hidden (literally) Seattle restaurant?

We were offered a couple of italian reds and whites off of the regular Sitka and Spruce wine list, two proseccos, and one or two $75 bottles of wine that were not on the list. These were out of our budget and we ended up having a nice Ruche di Castagnole Monferrato from the list.

Aug 20, 2007
ssusu in Pacific Northwest

Hidden (literally) Seattle restaurant?

It was in the Sitka and Spruce space. Sundays and Mondays, one seating per night.

Aug 20, 2007
ssusu in Pacific Northwest