i

izauze's Profile

Title Last Reply

Tacos Arizas in EP is Tripetastic

Agreed at their tripe is good. Their asada and other more standard options are a bit subpar and even gristley for me

Jul 06, 2014
izauze in Los Angeles Area

Wood Pizza. Silverlake

Was really excited for this place to open - a good, neighborhood, wood fired pizza place. But everything I've heard (down to charging for water) sounds like a nightmare. Hoping they get it together quick or give the space to someone who can,

Jul 06, 2014
izauze in Los Angeles Area

Great food AND great desserts? (AKA 2 birds, 1 stone :)

Sounds like we have a new item on our to do list :) Thanks all

Jun 14, 2013
izauze in Los Angeles Area

Great food AND great desserts? (AKA 2 birds, 1 stone :)

I've wanted to do Mozza's for a while, but haven't yet.

Providence might be fun for a splurge - I wonder if they'd let me get the entree tasting menu while she just gets the dessert tasting menu :)

I would think no, but if so that could be a grad slam.

Jun 14, 2013
izauze in Los Angeles Area

Great food AND great desserts? (AKA 2 birds, 1 stone :)

I'm trying to think - usually it's a hit more on one side of the menu than the other. We like Masa, Animal, Portos, Luna, Bottega Louie... does that help?

Jun 14, 2013
izauze in Los Angeles Area

Great food AND great desserts? (AKA 2 birds, 1 stone :)

Hey Hounds,

My GF and I love trying new places, new dishes, interesting food. However, most of the time she just samples my dish and more or less orders dessert as her entree. :P

Usually one of us has to compromise and we end up going to a place that has great food, but a boring/nonexistent dessert menu. Or has a few amazing desserts, but rather uninspired food. I'd love to have a selection of places that at least do something interesting on both ends of the menu - be they dives, splurges, or something in between. (We're open to pretty much any genre or culinary region) We're Central/East LA, but we'd drive out to the valley or the beach for a worthwhile place.

Any and all suggestions, tips would be appreciated.

Jun 14, 2013
izauze in Los Angeles Area

Napa sampler trip for 3

This looks really great - thank you. I may end up doing something really close to what you have here. I was looking at adding Hendry too, but there doesn't seem to be time.

I'm not exactly a stranger to mountain driving, but is it particularly bad? I must say, the one thing I'm not sure about is how much time to budget for certain out of the way drives. The google maps time seems on the optimistic side.

Feb 07, 2013
izauze in San Francisco Bay Area

Napa sampler trip for 3

We'll be spending about 2 full days in the valley, likely working our way northward before crossing over to Sanata Rosa on end of day2/beginning of day 3. I've heard to plan on about 3 per day. We'll probably do light snacking/picnicking for early meals and do a nice restaurant at the end of the day.

Glad you +1'd Pride, that was tops on my own personal list. For the rest, I'm mostly trying to balance my own personal tastes with others that might get tired of the big cabs and yearn for the occasional fruit-forward or oaky white.

(And you're right - not finding Jarvis' price was apparently an oversight)

Feb 04, 2013
izauze in San Francisco Bay Area

Napa sampler trip for 3

This is well-stated. I certainly didn't intend to insult anyone. I'm sorry, Carrie if I insulted you or anyone else. It was just meant to be a small part of my overall quest to experience the entirety of the area.

But I don't think in the least bit, I am someone who "defies what chowhound is about." I am a longtime user who is passionate about trying new things, new food, new cultures in a world that is all to often set up to deliver pre-packaged, easily digestible fare to the lowest common denominator. I thought I made it pretty clear in my opening sermon that I was coming at this with that sort of spirit. And maybe it's just the sociologist in me, but I don't think I negate that passion by my desire to examine a world that is devoid of it. For me traveling is not just about pampering myself and giving myself the best in all things - it's about creating a new understanding that is not benefited by ignoring that which we wish did not exist. ...Not to get too heady here, but geez. Like Sarah said - it's merely satisfying a curiosity.

And yes, when I've hosted vistors from a remote area of mainland China, I would totally show them something like a McDonalds or a Hot Pocket - usually over a laugh, but also because that's part of who we are, as unfortunate as that may be. We are a country that happily gobbles down billions of horrible amonia soaked, factory farmed, psuedo-meats till we kill ourselves. That's part of our story - and story is part of the reason I travel.

That being said, I understand that on forums like these on the internet, it's hard to parse intentions, and it's quite easy to assume the worst of them - because the worse of intentions are so unfortunately frequent. But I didn't mean to waste anyone's time and patience, and I certainly wish now that I had kept that little side note to myself so I could instead be benefitting right now from your expertise on where to find a good variety of great wine.

Feb 04, 2013
izauze in San Francisco Bay Area

Napa sampler trip for 3

Sigh. Didn't mean to sidetrack the entire discussion with one line about "I think I'll check out one tourist trap just to see what it's like".

I'd really appreciate any substantive replies on the rest of my post. I think I've actually been quite open and wiling to listen. I was really looking forward to talking with like-minded people about a topic I'm really genuinely excited about. I'm sorry that mentioning V. Sattui apparently derailed that. It's not that big a deal - it was just an idea. Can we still be friends?

Feb 03, 2013
izauze in San Francisco Bay Area

Napa sampler trip for 3

No worries, Maria. I've really respected the posts of seen from you, and some of the other places are on the list partially because of you. I'd certainly love it if you had any other words of wisdom beyond my misguided attempt to include one tourist trap.

Feb 03, 2013
izauze in San Francisco Bay Area

Napa sampler trip for 3

Sure, if you guys think it's misguided, I don't mind a little feedback. I am after all a first-time visitor.

As you can see, I did put a decent amount of effort into highlighting quality.

But my thoughts is, as someone who has never been to Napa and who is trying to create a trip for others with a wide variety of experiences, that seeing at least one winery that represents a well-known side of what Napa is for many people could give me a better perspective on the area as a whole. The drunken French Quarter probably isn't the best representative of the best that New Orleans has to offer, but do you really know the place if you've never been? Am I wrong?

If so, I'm happy to take other suggestions :)

Feb 03, 2013
izauze in San Francisco Bay Area

Napa sampler trip for 3

As an extension, I feel like if I wanted to tour Wisconsin Beer Country, I wouldn't just hit the craft breweries and skip Miller... For better or for worse, the factory is part of what the area is about.

Feb 03, 2013
izauze in San Francisco Bay Area

Napa sampler trip for 3

Thanks for the feedback. To be clear, I know that Mondavi, Castello, and Sattui are commercialized tourist traps - that's why they're there. I thought that to get a sense of the Valley from top to bottom, we should see one quintessential tourist spot in all its glory.

If you were to pick one winery to typify this side of the Valley, what would it be? I'm leaning V. Sattui...

Feb 03, 2013
izauze in San Francisco Bay Area

Napa sampler trip for 3

My challenge is this: creating a great Napa-area trip to please three pretty different first time visitors... One, a regular (oaky) Chardonay drinker who enjoys reds occasionally and casually; Two, a person with a decent palate who likes trying new and interesting things, but who isn't really a wine person; And myself, a newbie who loves good bold, spicy, high tannin reds.

If I were designing it just for myself, I'd do entirely off-the-beaten-path wineries where you were surrounded by nothing other than a palpable, genuine love for wine and winemaking. Of course there's nothing wrong with a winery that delivers a great experience, so long as its grounded in the celebration of the vine rather than the celebration of the dollar. I'm not terribly interested in the Disneyland for rich people thing, other than to marvel at it from a distance as exactly what it is.

Sermon aside, I think I'd like to find a variety of places (be they big or small) where each of us can experience that kind of love, while also making everyone happy with a variety of wine types and experiences. I even think I should put one of those quintessential tourist spots on the list, if only for juxtaposition. I think in the end we'd all be happy to take in a little bit of Napa from top to bottom.

Anyway, I've been building a list of nominees (we may get around 6 in). Any additions, subtractions, +1's or other guidance would be greatly appreciated.

Chappellet

Frog's Leap

Dunn

Spring Mountain

Pride Mountain

Ladera

Outpost

Jarvis

Castello Di Amorosa

Robert Mondavi

Domaine Carneros

Domaine Chandon

V. Sattui

Feb 03, 2013
izauze in San Francisco Bay Area

Brand new Silverlake Ramen reviewed

Just went to Silverlake Ramen with a friend, not expecting a whole lot, but still hopeful. Mostly because I don't want to wait in the lines for Daikokuya, and I don't want to drive all the way out to Sawtelle or beyond for decent ramen. Overall, I was pleasantly surprised.

Now, this may not quite enter my top 5 list, but it's up there - certainly the convenience factor adds to its appeal. In the tonkotsu ramen, the portion size was nice, as were the toppings. The egg cost 1 dollar extra, but was among the best I've had. The broth was nice and cloudy and creamy - somewhere in the Daikokuya zone of broths, but not overflowing with character. The noodles are a little thin, but there are plenty of them. The biggest disappointment may have been the one thin slice of Chashu, though you can add more as an extra.

My friend had the tsukemen, which comes with a half-egg by default and 2 cuts of chashu. The noodle is thicker and a bit nicer and cheweyer. And the broth is certainly much more dense and much heavier on the bonito than some others I've had. Very nice though.

Anyway, I would certainly recommend it for all you eastsiders who don't feel like braving the lines for Daikokuya, and don't want to make the trek to the west side or the valley. It definitely satisfied my ramen urge for the night. I think it should certainly be somewhere on the 2nd tier ramen map of the rapidly growing LA scene. I'll give it another go in a few months and see how they're doing after their soft open. Go and let me know what you think!

Oct 01, 2012
izauze in Los Angeles Area