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Umami salad dressing

So often I'll come across incredible vinaigrettes while eating a salad at a restaurant. I'll ask the staff what is in the dressing and usually they'll respond with some variation of olive oil, vinegar, mustard, garlic, shallots, s/p. I make this type of dressing at home all the time and although it is delicious, it doesn't ever have that extra wow factor that I often experience when eating out.

I've been reading up on umami and some of the most common ingredients being tomato paste, anchovy paste, nutritional yeast, dried porcini mushrooms, fish sauce, parmesan cheese & truffles. I'm going to start experimenting with each of these, but thought I'd also turn to the boards and see if anyone has experiencing using these (or any other "secret" ingredient) in their dressings and/or a recipe they can share.

Mar 23, 2014
kjbnyc in Home Cooking

Sauce - Mysterious Ingredient

Thank you everyone!! I'm thrilled there's an explanation for it and look forward to giving it a try this weekend!

Mar 01, 2014
kjbnyc in Home Cooking

Sauce - Mysterious Ingredient

A local restaurant of mine serves a chicken with lemon sauce that I love. I've asked what is in the sauce and they said butter, lemon & white wine. They claimed there is no flour or other thickeners, yet the sauce is opaque. Wouldn't a mostly butter sauce be a transparent and oily sauce similar to melting butter for lobster or popcorn? I can't imagine that the addition of lemon and white wine would give it an opaque and thick consistency.

Do you really think the chef isn't using flour or some other thickener? If so, would it have something to do with the technique or type of butter that they are using?

Feb 28, 2014
kjbnyc in Home Cooking

Bone broth mystery

Really informative link, hotoynoodle! Thanks for posting.

Sep 25, 2012
kjbnyc in Home Cooking

Bone broth mystery

I never said it was a classic beef stock or that I used beef exclusively. I said it was a bone soup, which included bone marrow. I'm not looking for a more clear stock for appearances; this last batch had a lot of sediment in it, which did not appeal to me from a taste/consistency standpoint and which did not occur with the previous crock pot. Bone broth is not a new term, nor was I using it in the context of replacing classic beef stock. My parents spoke of my grandparents having a pot simmer on the stove for several days and just throwing in leftovers throughout the week. My butcher directed me to quickly clean the bones to remove any excess material, as per his training at the prestigious Fleisher's.

Sep 25, 2012
kjbnyc in Home Cooking

Bone broth mystery

Thanks thimes. You brought up some really interesting points!

There's def a difference with the seal. In the old pot, the smell from the cooking permeated the house, but with the new pot, you could hardly tell I was cooking anything. I bet you're right with it getting hotter faster and that causing the excess sediment. I wasn't really paying attention during the first few hours of using the new pot, but I did notice towards the end of the 24 hours that it was not boiling like my old pot did. Nonetheless, I still think the "getting hotter faster" theory is worth looking into!!!

For my next batch, instead of starting off on High for 2 hours, I'll try the following scenarios of 1 hour on High, and 23 hours on Low as well as just cooking on Low the entire time and see what that brings.

Thanks for your insight!!! Very helpful!

Sep 25, 2012
kjbnyc in Home Cooking

Bone broth mystery

Cleaned the bones of any excess material, esp the bone marrow bones.

Sep 25, 2012
kjbnyc in Home Cooking

Bone broth mystery

After an adverse reaction to a medication that caused moderate tendinitis, I was recommened to consume a bone broth. I recently switched slow cookers and never thought that one change would cause such a big difference in the end product. I'm hoping someone here could offer advice as to what I should tweak with the new slow cooker to get that delicious broth I was getting with the old slow cooker. Here's my story.........

For the last eight months, I have been making a broth that consisted of bones (including marrow), carrots, celery and some apple cider vinegar. I would cook it in this slow cooker for the first 2 hours on high and the remaining 22 hours on low. http://www.crock-pot.com/product.aspx...

There wouldn't be much to skim off the top at any point. And towards the end of cooking, the broth would be slightly bubbling. I would strain it through a cheese cloth and leave it in the fridge overnight. Next morning, I'd remove the fat and store in various containers in the freezer.

I've recently made a batch in a new slow cooker - http://store.calphalon.com/calphalon-.... All other variables remain the same, i.e. food, process, etc. and yet there were some differing aspects that have me perplexed. The broth formed a film on top that I had noticed around 15 hours in. I scraped it off and it formed again several hours later. It also never bubbled up. Once cooking was done, the appearnce of the broth was different. It appeared to contain A LOT more sediment. Even after straining and cooling, there was a layer of sediment at the bottom of the broth, which had not been the case previously. I scrubbed the bones, just as I always do, so I really think it's the new slow cooker. Should it cook longer? Less? Are there any other tweaks you would recommened?

Sep 24, 2012
kjbnyc in Home Cooking