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Kosher Indian Comes To Teaneck

I went last night for the first time. Also disappointed with the blandness, and chewy pieces of meat. But the lamb curry was superb. Tandoor chicken - dried out. The service still needs a lot of work. There was only the maitre'd (who served) and 1 waiter. Service was slow, spotty and forgetful. And there were only 4 tales occupied during most of our visit. Would worry on a busy night.

Dec 02, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Tevere 84 - Request for Reviews/Comments

I agree with cappucino. My visits over the years were adventures of mouth-watering wonder. I can still taste the flavors of the beef carpaccio. But over the last 2 years - I've been disappointed. No more zing to the food. It feels like the chef has been on permanent vacation, and all preparation is done by the line cooks using recipes he left behind. But still - Which place is any better? We're bereft of good kosher restaurants in the NY area.

Dec 01, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Mosaica - NJ. Excellent

I ate there 2 weeks ago. First time. Ambiance - pleasant; Service - very attentive; Presentation - beautiful; Taste - Better than almost anywhere else in the NY metro area. But still missing that "Oh Wow" sensation that comes when an outstanding flavor hits your palate. Generally under-seasoned food. Missing the punch of flavors that can really open up a dish. I get that at Tevere, and got it at Solo when the guest chef was in; occasionally at Pasta Factory; and when Esme first opened. But not here. Will still go back, because it's still far better than anything we have around the Teaneck area. And Michel was very open and interested in hearing what we had to say.

Dec 01, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Cheese help!

There's a great kosher medium cheddar from Tillamook Cheese, a terrific cheese manufacturer. It's their only kosher item, and you generally only see it in kosher gift baskets. I've ordered from them by phone. A case (12 blocks) is 5 pounds. www.tillamookcheese.com. They keep well in the freezer.

Since you're from Texas, let us know if you come across any kosher BBQ that's worth knowing aboout.

Also you can get some nice French and Italian cheeses, as well as the regular kosher lines, online at the kosher supermarket-type websites. Like www.kosher.com, www.mykoshermarket.com, and others. Just Google it and many sites will show up.

Mar 31, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Besamim Mix

Thank you for your thoughts p.j. I'm staying away from nutmeg, cinammon and allspice because I don't want to make it too sweet or X-masy. A little orange peel could be good, and I'll definitely try the cardamom, which I don't know at all. And thanks for the candle thought. I had completely forgotten about that. A nice big shul-size torch will be just the right thing.

Mar 14, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Bacon Salt - Kashrut reliability?

The Seattle Vaad (largest grouping of orthodox shuls, organizations, kashrus, in the region) does NOT recommend Rabbi Londinski's hechsher. The Square K is not listed in the Seattle Vaad's "Reliable Kosher Agencies" list (check their website), and they affirmatively do not recommend his hashgocho. Sorry. The Bacon Salt looks like fun thing to try. Even their website is fun. You can always go back to Bacos. And they're pretty salty.

Mar 14, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Besamim Mix

If you don't need much, you can buy a fresh myrtle potted plant, and just strip the leaves off and dry them out. It has such a lovely fragrance. What types of recipes use myrtle?

Mar 14, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

food for traveling

We've taken Noah's Ark (Teaneck) frozen meals with us on a few vacations, and have always been pleased. And they come double wrapped, so if you're using a general hotel kitchen, they can just throw it in the oven as is.

We also take with us the Israeli cup-style containers of soup, couscous, rice, etc, available in most kosher food markets. They are easy to transport and just need hot water.

Dried salami is also a favorite. Hang up a fresh salami 2 weeks before you leave (take the plastic off, but not the red wrapper), and you'll have an easy to carry, great snack. Although the security dogs may take special notice of your suitcase.

Mar 14, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Besamim Mix

For my son's Bar Mitzvah, in May, I want to make a large amount of Besamim to give out to our guests, in small bags, on Saturday night. Initially, I thought of using just whole cloves. Then I thought to add dried Hadas (myrtle) leaves, which has a lovely smell. But I don't know where to find them. Anyone have any idea where I might find Hadasim (myrtle)? Any suggestions as to other spices I might add to the mix?

Mar 14, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

homemade kosher pickles

Noted. A glass jar and plastic pipe for $25 is a lot. If you pickle so much - many gallons at a time - did you ever try pickling using a ceramic crock (e.g. Harsch)? It takes much longer, but the pickles can also sit in the crock for weeks, even months, without refrigeration.

Feb 29, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

homemade kosher pickles

I LOVE PICKLES! Thanks for the recipe! I throw a few whole peppercorns into my brine, for a little back-kick. Instead of a plain glass jar, I've used a nifty product called The Perfect Pickler, which is essentially a glass jar with a bent plastic tube that comes out of a hole in the lid, giving room for the gases to expand without getting brine all over the place. It's available online at www.perfectpickler.com. They also have some great recipes.

Feb 28, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Any suggestions for GOOD kosher wine?

Herzog has a "Prix" wine that I've read about, but have been unable to find in my local Teaneck and Riverdale wine stores. Anyone see it around?

Feb 18, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Cinnabon Open in Teaneck Area

About 2 weeks ago a Cinnabon/Carvel store in the Teaneck, NJ area, that had been in existence for a year or two, re-opened under Chof-K supervision. As far as I know, it's the only kosher Cinnabon. (It's also now the only kosher full-service Carvel store in the area).

Most of the store is Carvel. The Cinnabon portion in the front is basically a small prep area, a small oven, and a display case with trays. Total 6 square feet.

It's basically 1 product, a sweet cinnamon danish with frosting. The variations are 3 different sizes (Classic, Mini and Bites) and a "cinna-stick" (like a large twisted french fry) that you dip into a little frosting cup. They have a "pecan" variety that just has crushed pecans sprinkled on top.

They proof and bake them fresh in the oven at the counter, and then shmear frosting on top.

The AROMA is comforting and delicious. It's really 75% of the benefit.

The TASTE, well, it tastes like white bread cinnamon french toast rolled-up with a little chocloate syrup, with frosting on top. Having it once is OK, but it really isn't compelling enough to be part of your regular junk food diet. The Classic size is way too big for a human. If you would eat a whole one, you'd feel carbed-out for the day. At aboout half the size, the Mini is better. The Bite is too small and doesn't convey the flavor. Also, you have to eat them hot. Out of the oven or microwaved. The Bite loses it's heat too fast, and it gets hard.

Given that this is the first kosher Cinnabon, and that area has many people who want to try it, they are not at all prepared to meet the demand. The oven holds around 40 Classic size buns, and they take almost half an hour to proof and bake. They typically sell them in packs of 6. So they can maximally serve half a dozen people (who come with families and kids) until you have to wait for the next round. I was there twice on Sunday afternoons (probably the busiest time)and neither time was anything placed in the display cases. They came out of the oven, went right into boxes and into the hands of people who had already paid and were milling around the register. And you had to buy whatever size they happened to be baking at that time. A second oven would help.

Interested in your thoughts.

Feb 13, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Kosher Cinnabon Now Open?

Wow! Thanks for the info. I live in Teaneck, and didn't hear a word about it.

Feb 02, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Main Event or Prestige

Is Morrell under Orthodox supervision? I couldn't find any reference to supervision on their website, and by their web presentation you would barely know they are a kosher caterer of any sort. They are certainly not marketing to the Orthodox community.

Feb 02, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Super Bowl hero in Manhattan?

If you're seriously thinking of coming to Teaneck, both Noah's Ark and Ma'adan make top notch Heros.

Feb 02, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Challeh for a Bris(Manhattan)

Gertels has a line they sell to outside stores - Delancey Desserts. Their website is www.babka.com

Jan 17, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

cakes via the mail?

Can't you drive it over? Or send it by car service from the nearest kosher bakery. Traditional birthday cakes are too hard to ship. Forgetting about the soft cake that might not survive FedEx, what about the cream? You'll end up with a real mush. Maybe a cake with hard icing, that's carefully packaged, will work. Maybe a seven layer cake, or some other firm cake. You can still write Happy Birthday on it. Or try Koshersupermarket.com or koshercornucopia.com. They may have something that works for you - like a gift basket.

Jan 08, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Main Event or Prestige

I live in Teaneck, where Main Event is the caterer for many, many local events (Joey Bodner lives here). I don't recall ever being at one of their events where either the food, service or presentation was anything but top notch. They take pride in their product, and they try to maintain a very high standard. (You pay for it.).

I find that the difference between Main Event and Prestige, is like the difference between Manhattan and New Jersey. Prestige is more urbane. They do a beautiful job, and present with more style. If the food suffers slightly (and it's only slightly) for appearance sake, so be it. Main Event takes a more suburban approach. Lots of good food. Pile it on. But make it look nice. Not toooo busy so that the food suffers, but still nice enough to be high-end. From my perspective, the choice is whether you want to give the "edge" to style or food. If you're a fancy, showy type, Prestige may be a better fit. If you're a fresser, and don't care as much whether the soup tureens are polished silver, you might be more satisfied with Main Event. Either way - Don't forget to have fun!

Jan 08, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Miami

Sorry. It's 959 West Ave, MB (the most westerly N/S street on MB. West of Alton Rd, corner of 10th Avenue). They used to be on 1st St in Miami.

You're right about the area. I guess there are a few Jews around.

Anyway, it's worth a visit if you're in Miami.

Jan 08, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Miami

Great natural food leaning restaurant on 10th St and 1st avenue, in Miami Beach, called Gourmet Carrot. Delicious food. Not just the standard boring tofu fare. All types of interesting salads, tasty fish dishes, soups, shakes. Also a few meat items, like stir fry chicken, and burgers. Small place, with indoor seating and sidewalk tables. Good neighborhood restaurant. Not expensive. Not the type of place that would typically be under hashgocho in a primarily non-frum area, but it is. (I don't recall who gives the hashgocho, but the religious Miami Beach community eats there). And plenty for kids to enjoy too.

Jan 04, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Penn Station Krispy Kreme Kosher Again

Can anyone explain to me the current kashrut status of the Krispy Creme stores throughout the city? Is the main production facility, in Queens, still under hashgocho? Is Rabbi Mehlman still involved anywhere? Why did everything change? What happened?

Jan 04, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Main Event or Prestige

They are both great caterers. Top of the line. You can't go wrong with either. But you'll pay$$$ for it!! If you want to save a lot of money, there are many excellent caterers that don't charge an arm and a leg.

Jan 03, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Abeles & Heymann Bison Products

Bison corned beef and pastrami, pre-packaged, at Glatt Express in Teaneck. Flavorful. but very dry. Very little fat. Funny, bison don't look so skinny!

Jan 03, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

looking for parve dairy free cookies that are in supermarkets

Supermarkets generally don't carry lines of pareve cookies, because the national brands carried in supermarkets are all milchig (aside from Stella D'oro, as mentioned). But if your local supermarket has a kosher section or aisle, you might check there for the "Jewish" brands, which will be pareve. You'll find the most pareve lines in the Jewish supermarkets, in every large Jewish neighborhood. . You can also find them in health food stores, which stock them to satisfy the needs of their dairy-free customers.

Jan 03, 2008
bfarkas in Kosher

Smokey Joes in Teaneck

And, yes, the ribs are beef. I don't know how they come so small either.

Dec 31, 2007
bfarkas in Kosher

Israel dining questions

In Eilat there are many fine fancy restaurants, with "gourmet" type food, but they are all exorbitantly priced. I mean - it's PAINFUL to read the menu, even expecting resort prices. One that's not so high, but very good, is Yakimono - A fine Japanese restaurant, in the Queen of Sheba hotel.

One of my favorite Eilat restaurants is Denise Kingdom - It's on the north end of the city (all the cab drivers know it). They raise their own fish ("denise" fish. I think it's tilapia or something like it), and serve it fresh, broiled, baked, fried, any way you like it, with simple but good side dishes. They have a few dishes for non-fish eaters, but primarily it's denise fish all the way. Tasty, fresh food, healthy portions, at a very low price compared with most any other Eilat restaurant. Rustic decor. Not fancy at all. Shorts are fine. The staff is very friendly and the place is kid and family friendly. There's even a small playground on the side. And on your way out you can buy some of their fresh fish, boxed, in ice. (Unless you're just going back to your hotel, in which case it wouldn't be a very good idea, unless you have a hibachi that fits in your bathroom sink.)

Dec 31, 2007
bfarkas in Kosher

Anyone know where to buy Kosher Mole?

If you're STILL looking, after those last few great answers, I have one lead. Smokey Joes, a kosher Tex-Mex restaurant in Teaneck, NJ, serves Mole dishes. The owner is a very nice guy. I'm sure one phone call will be all it takes to find out where he gets his Mole. Or if he makes his own, maybe he bottles it for sale!

Dec 31, 2007
bfarkas in Kosher

RJ's Kosher Beef Jerky

I ordered some of the beef jerkys on line, and they went in a flash. My kids LOVED them. Good flavor, good jerky texture, moist. The unusual salmon jerky was very tasty. The turkey jerky was the least flavorful and the driest. They also sell sausages online. Anyone try them? Are they the same as Jeff's Gourmet?

Dec 06, 2007
bfarkas in Kosher

Favorite Meat & Dairy Restaurants in Teaneck

I haven't been to Jerusalem of Gold (see earlier postings), but the other places in Teaneck that serve meat Israeli food are Sababa Grill, Mabat (both on Cedar Lane) and Persian Grill. Mabat has always had excellent food (for shish kebob/schwarma type stuff), but they raised their prices a short while ago, to to the point where they are now unconscionably expensive for this type of food. I'm talking $25 to $50 main dishes! For Shish Kebabs! I couldn't feed my (little) kids for less than $35 each, for soup, 2 skewers and a side dish. So I don't go there any more. Persian Grill has very good food, with a little better spice and prep action, and the Persian twist, with some good sweet dishes. Slightly less money. Similar setting. For a little dumpier environment, but good, fresh food, with a good ta'am, try Sababa Grill. The price is half to a third less than Mabat. Top notch Moroccan chicken soup; best chicken cutlets in Teaneck; excellent schwarma; tasty side dishes (al dente string beans, fluffy couscous, orzo, flavory grilled veg's). Wherever you go - enjoy!!

Nov 21, 2007
bfarkas in Kosher