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Pat50's Profile

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How Can Someone Be Allergic to Meat?

Since birth I have been allergic to cats, dogs, hay, ragweed and golden rod. Nevertheless I loved cats and dogs and, at various times had one or the other. Until, that is, the day, I went to empty the litter box of my pregnant cat who had just recently given birth to a litter. To pick up the litter box I extended my arms/hands; at one foot from the box, suddenly my hands prickled and then, every single pore on the back of my hands rose up like a thousand mini volcanoes and proceeded to spurt a clear (lymphatic?) fluid. This then turned to raw, bloody, lacerated skin which refused to heal for over two weeks. Later, I had a similar reaction when trying to prepare raw liver. When cooked, I could eat the liver with no reaction. I also had a reaction to a vaccine cultured in egg. They asked me to wait one hour after vaccination; impatient, with nothing happening, I begged to leave after 45 mins. Luckily I was not driving. Walking home, I looked at the time and found my entire arm severely swollen like an enormous sausage. Then it seemed like my feet were heavy and I was walking on marshmallows instead of pavement. I concentrated hard to reach my door but then fell asleep for 6+ hours to awake with the swelling and mental confusion gone. I asked the science teacher about it and she said that the next time I might die, so I have never allowed them to vaccinate me with any vaccine cultured in eggs since then. I also have hives and itching when licked by dogs and cats, respiratory distress when confronted by urine even 2-3 feet away and skin reactions when confronted by dog, cat, horse or cow faeces even 2-3 feet away. Yet I can eat rare beef (not raw), thoroughly cooked pork is OK, as is chicken, and I often eat (raw) fish/sushi with no problems (though I have never tried touching it with my hands when it was raw).

May 11, 2015
Pat50 in Features

How would I like my salmon? PERFECT

Me too! Like probiotics we probably all need a few of them in our gut. I started off, as a young woman, eating salmon, and most other things, cooked through; until the moment I tried a piece of translucent (wild, of course) salmon still dark pink and shiny in the middle. How fresh! How velvety! How succulent! One could really feel as well as taste the fish oil on the tongue and lips; almost as good as lox. There was no going back to the bland, cloudy taste of salmon cooked through. Not sure (I'm neither scientist not gourmet) but I think it is the oil component which is missing in salmon cooked through?, which gets changed by cooking through; changed, degraded somehow? so it no longer feels silky smooth. And for me, that silky smooth feel/taste has become the arbiter of a "proper" or "perfect" salmon cook.

Apr 26, 2015
Pat50 in Not About Food

Nickel-Plated Cast Iron Pans

Thanks, Kaleokahu. Yes, it probably is not worth the risk. As I suspected. Too bad. But my regular cast iron is still wonderful and not too much trouble, really, so, like a faithless lover, I guess I should not be letting my eye wander for no really good reason. Thanks, again.

Feb 17, 2015
Pat50 in Cookware

Nickel-Plated Cast Iron Pans

This is an old thread so I'm not sure if anyone is still watching it, but, .... My question is about the nickel and allergies. Can people who are unable to wear nickle plated earrings handle this nickle plated cookware or would you get an allergic reaction from it? The features sound nice but not at the expense of (yet another) outbreak on my hands, due to nickle this time. But maybe they have sealed it somehow so the nickle doesn't react with skin anymore? Or not?

Feb 17, 2015
Pat50 in Cookware

What Else Can You Do with Green Papaya?

Ah, yes, thanks for the picture. It is clear at once this is an entirely different plant. So, obviously the same name is used for different things in different places. It's good to know that is so, because then at least we all know enough to stop and check that we're all talking about the same thing at the same time. I don't recognise the plant in the picture but I do love custard apples and soursop. Some people make icecream from soursop but I always just preferred it warm off the tree, messy, in my bare hands, spitting out the seeds on the ground.

Jan 21, 2015
Pat50 in Features

Induction cooker quality

Years ago I bought a GE Profile ceramic flat top range. I treated it gently, as described in the manual, using basic soapy cloth to clean it and the odd ceramic cleaner. The range worked fairly well, but in the last couple years the markings on the dials have simply been rubbed off; apparently they were only painted on to the stainless steel and not etched into it. I enquired from Sears about a replacement; they told us that, despite the fact that my husband had insisted on an extended warranty that this problem with the control panel was considered a "cosmetic" issue and was not covered. You can imagine how "P'D" I was; heat markings on the dial are NOT cosmetic in any sensible universe. We have now decided to go the induction route and just replace the whole thing; before committing though we decided to test out the induction thing by buying one of those Kuradori single burner induction hotplates at the local hardware store - west coast Canada. By feeling with my finger it appears that this too has the markings just painted on, which means it will last only a few years; my ask to the community is this: on the larger full cooktops, by brand, or vendor has anyone experienced a problem with the markings just being wiped off/worn off after some years? (Spending in excess of $3,000 dollars only to find that the top has to be replaced in 7-10 years because the markings have faded/disappeared would annoy me beyond reason. At my age we still believe in the concept of "durable" goods.)

Dec 28, 2014
Pat50 in Cookware

Homemade imitation maple syrup using fenugreek seeds?

This was posted awhile ago so don't know if anyone is still interested but .... I just heard that you have to warm the seeds, not toast them, then grind them finely, then extract the flavour using alcohol, so mix the grind with something neutral like vodka and let it sit for a month. I haven't tried it, so I can't comment on how well this works but the person who told me said it's good (and he said it only works with alcohol, not water or oil. Hope that helps. I'm hoping to try it sometime when I have some time to experiment.

Oct 23, 2014
Pat50 in Home Cooking

Have you ever lived overseas?

LOL indeed. Single man's pork! Well, I guess that is a logical question, albeit one I never imagined coming up. So, "married man pork" is a type of herb like thyme or basil. It has a very distinctive taste - I don't know how to describe it, but it turns bland versions of black pudding (and many other dishes) into sparkling magic. I wish I knew the botanical/Latin name for it; I have searched high and low for it on the internet but without the botanical/Latin name it seems impossible to find any to buy. And, of course, it was always a homegrown herb and not one dried or preserved or commercially farmed, so perhaps not likely it would be for sale anywhere. But again, thanks for the smile. That is what is so great about sharing experiences and stories. They just grow richer with time and more hands in the pot.

Aug 24, 2014
Pat50 in General Topics

Have you ever lived overseas?

Oh, my! I guess I really wasn't expecting that anyone would actually still be out there attending to a 5 year old forum post. But I'm glad you were/are listening because, yes, memories, like food, really are best when shared.

Aug 24, 2014
Pat50 in General Topics

Have you ever lived overseas?

Just found your post! Hoping that after 5 years it's not too late to contribute? Ten years in Guyana and ten years in Suriname, ok? Dhal puri roti and curry made from iguana or turtle (not known to be endangered then) or anaconda, real pepper sauce that wasn't cut with anything - so hot one could not breath the air in the kitchen for hours. Gado gado, yum! Married man pork, black pudding and sour, sorrel, mauby, cassava pone, genip and tamarind picked straight from the tree, fried channa with garlic in a paper twist at the school gate, saoto soup (with laos), coconut water straight from the nut, soft coconut jelly scooped up with a piece of the husk and enjoyed in the dark as one walked through the market on the way home from the cinema, pepperpot made from the cassareep extracted from bitter cassava, 25 year old rum, straight, with a single ice cube, garlic pork on Xmas morning. Good memories, wonderful food.

Aug 23, 2014
Pat50 in General Topics

What Else Can You Do with Green Papaya?

I also remember soaking the peppery seeds in water and then straining it off and making a drink out of it, but for the life of me I can't remember the taste except that it was mild; it was so long ago and, being young, I was too lazy to bother most times. If anyone else remembers having done this it would be nice to see a recreation, photos, quantities, description of the taste, etc.

Aug 14, 2014
Pat50 in Features

What Else Can You Do with Green Papaya?

Hi Keysellynart: Obviously you (and your grandfather) must come from a different place than I and my family do. Sometimes the same word/name in place B can mean something completely different from what it means in place A. Where I come from pawpaw is definitely papaya and it is definitely NOT poisonous and I have definitely been using green pawpaw/papaya to eat for my whole life. (It took me awhile when I came back to North America to learn to call it papaya as they do here but I, and all my family and friends always have and probably always will continue to refer to this fruit/papaya as pawpaw because that is the name everyone knew it by as children growing up, going to the market, etc.) What would be interesting is to see a picture of the thing you call pawpaw so we can all make sure we are all reading off the same page, as it were.

Aug 14, 2014
Pat50 in Features

How to cook burmese python?

Sounds like you really know what you are doing here. Especially about the sinew. Would like to come eat at your house. Sounds delicious.

Aug 11, 2014
Pat50 in Home Cooking

How to cook burmese python?

Yes, many, many years ago, when I lived in a village near the Amazon, a 20-30 ft anaconda (head in the grass on one side of a road [one lane each way], tail in the grass on the other side) killed by a lorry was quickly divided up by villagers, tenderized in pressure cookers and curried. But then most things were curried and pressured there, or pressured and boiled for days and days in cassareep to make pepperpot which is dark, black syrup made from bitter cassava - boiling destroys the poison (cyanide I think? ) and with scotch bonnet peppers, clove and cinnamon that is lovely; my favourite though, I think was the iguana which was quite nice; definitely wild and flavourful and tastier than any beef I ever ate.

As for why anyone would want to eat wild meat? Like Everest, because it's there, and, so long as it is not endangered (at that time the anaconda and iguanas were not, at least that we knew of - obviously many years ago), they have a much lighter carbon footprint then factory farmed beef or chicken or pork and taste way, way better. Besides, if the animal is dead anyway, like the snake was, why waste the protein?

Aug 11, 2014
Pat50 in Home Cooking

Won Ton Soup Broth, a second try

Yes, if I don't have shrimp shells I may use shrimp paste, "trasi" which is Indonesian I guess? a fermented shrimp paste, really, really good, though a little over the top for wonton soup; but anything is better than the plain water with ginger I have endured at a few restaurants.

Jul 06, 2014
Pat50 in Home Cooking

Won Ton Soup Broth, a second try

Thanks to both you and Vicki_Vale for mentioning the fish/shrimp stock. After some investigation and experimentation we discovered that the only thing that tasted "authentic" was a fish based stock with shrimp shells; we now use fish-heads and shrimp shells and create a wonton soup which is truly "shiver worthy" (as when you get shivers of delight from something exquisite). Fish-heads are even better than bonito flakes because they add the necessary body which turns an "OK" wonton broth into a masterpiece and the shrimp shells give it the wonderful aroma and distinctive taste.

Jul 06, 2014
Pat50 in Home Cooking

The Red Howler Hot Sauce

Nope, I've made my own hot sauce and fresh peppers have a lovely fragrance and that should come through in the final product.

Jan 23, 2014
Pat50 in Recipes

Foodie Angst about East Coast Canada Move

Yes, I've made quite a few moves in my life too, including the "drop everything" type, but this move will the the last move of our lives and being less resilient and having less stamina and muscle power in the last few years, it is important that it be done right. So, thanks to all of you, this gives me a lot of good places to start. See you on the streets of Halifax then someday!

Nov 26, 2013
Pat50 in Atlantic Canada

Foodie Angst about East Coast Canada Move

Yes, you're probably right. Not to mention that we are starting to plan for renovations required before we can sell here. I think there must be a reno brain syndrome and possibly a large move syndrome as well. The bigger part of the renos soon, then a trip out next summer to see the lay of the land and meet up with a relative out there, then next fall/winter the cosmetic finish part of the renos and then in the spring, selling and moving ,... yeah, I guess flipping would be a good word. Thanks for your patience.

Nov 25, 2013
Pat50 in Atlantic Canada

Foodie Angst about East Coast Canada Move

Just curious; are the fish from trucks safe to eat? They sell them from the side of the road out west here too but I never thought they would be safe enough to eat. If I want fresh I go to the wharf in Maple Ridge.

While I'm here might as well ask another question. Just went today to order my fresh pork leg which I cure every year for my Xmas ham. It started me wondering about a few other ingredients I like to have around, or at least be able to get for special occasions, so here goes: where on the east coast (halifax but am also willing to travel now and then for special items) can one get: fishheads, pork feet, fresh pork legs? Given the East Coast reputation for fish, I suppose fishheads are available in lots of places? But can I get my pork feet and fresh leg of pork every Xmas at some meat market or store, or is that something one can only get at a farm? If the latter does anyone know which farms would sell the feet and a leg without asking you to buy the whole, or even a half pig because even with a dedicated freezer I doubt that I would have room for that. Which reminds me - I don't anticipate transporting my upright freezer from west to east, so, given all the good restaurants everyone has talked about here, I assume that there is somewhere one can buy a dedicated upright freezer? You have all been so helpful I hope I am not overdoing these questions.

Nov 24, 2013
Pat50 in Atlantic Canada

Foodie angst about East Coast Canada move

Yes, CanadaGirl, thanks to you and to many others who were generous with their time and advice. Now the only thing I have to be anxious about is the cold and snow. Thanks to all who responded to my query. Maybe I should wear a Pat50 button ;) when I first move to the East Coast so you can all say hello in the "ethnic" grocery stores and restaurants you have directed me to and I can invite you all to a party where you can all sample the fruits of your assistance. ;)

Jackfruit in the Triangle

If you get some, have you ever considered making chips - fried or perhaps baked - from the green fruit? If you do, let me know how you like it - or not.

Nov 19, 2013
Pat50 in Southeast

Jackfruit in the Triangle

I'm so sorry Tom that you don't like durian. It, and jackfruit are both so good, but especially the durian that my mouth waters just thinking about it. Admittedly the aroma is pretty horrible but if you can hold your nose until it is in front of you and then just dig in, the wonderful taste will soon have you learning to tolerate the smell in order to get to the great taste. Ah, well, though, to each his own of course. My mother-in-law loved bitter melon/corilla but I can't stand it no matter how she cooked it.

Nov 19, 2013
Pat50 in Southeast

Foodie Angst about East Coast Canada Move

Now that is one thing that definitely excites me about the east coast. I remember as a child going to the cottage for the summer and having an outdoor meal with lots of lobster my grandfather caught (he wasn't a fisher/lobsterman by profession but somehow I remember him having some lobster pots the uncles helped him with? how that all worked is now lost in the mists of time), rather like the modern day equivalent of hamburgers and hotdogs on the grill but way tastier. we get some shellfish out here in the west but I have memories of way better shellfish down east. Lobster, oysters, mussels, oh yes. Looking forward to that.

Nov 19, 2013
Pat50 in Atlantic Canada
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Foodie Angst about East Coast Canada Move

Sounds like the informal, spontaneous weekend parties we used to have in Suriname; Saturday afternoon on the patio, good music, enough good food, perhaps being cooked as we partied; something good to drink, lots of dancing,(not too sure about the jig thing?) .... I could live with that. And give me the occasional visit to a really good restaurant for variety. Maybe a theatre or play now and then. Yeah, sounds doable.

Nov 19, 2013
Pat50 in Atlantic Canada

Looking for wild smoked salmon in Halifax area

I'm really curious about this "bland, watery and just not very 'salmony'" tasting non-farmed salmon; just to see it, and taste it to find out what it is and where it comes from and how it got like this. The wild salmon I eat is darkly coloured, rich and meaty tasting (by that I mean firm, compact and very strongly salmon flavoured). I am so curious to know what you bought and why it tasted so awful. (On the other hand, I could just wish such an abomination would simply disappear.) But I still wouldn't eat farmed salmon as a substitute. To me, farmed salmon is just plain nasty. I'd just have to give up eating salmon at all.

Hey, if we all live another 50 years - which I definitely won't - we wouldn't have to worry about this anyway; all the shellfish will die off as the seas get more acid and probably a lot of the fish will die off too as the waters heat up.

Nov 18, 2013
Pat50 in Atlantic Canada

What specifically about a dishwasher is damaging to cookware?

Based on that kind of advice I switched to Cascade Complete pillows and the problem immediately got much, much worse. I changed to another detergent and the problem returned to being the odd stainless implement and the black plastic implements only. I won't go back to Cascade. It made the problem worse for me.

Nov 15, 2013
Pat50 in Cookware

Foodie Angst about East Coast Canada Move

No idea yet. I haven't been to Halifax in over 60 years. We'll have to come out next summer and look around.

I did the bars/pubs/restaurant scene in my 20s and that is still enjoyable now and then but not exclusively; then in my 30s and 40s when we lived in the tropics, I discovered a talent for throwing really fabulous parties on the larger side; later we moved back to North America and the city and I've enjoyed the grocers etc but felt constrained by the lack of space for entertaining. Parties with less than 10 people just don't seem to be as much fun. Guess it was a bit of a pipe dream from the sounds of things but I was hoping in retirement I could combine the great food resources with the space for entertaining. (Now my sister, who thinks black pepper is too spicy, is considering retiring in Costa Rica. Go figure!)

Nov 14, 2013
Pat50 in Atlantic Canada

Foodie Angst about East Coast Canada Move

Nope, I'm not into winter sports per se. I was thinking more of the long cold winter months and everyone being cooped up inside, when and where do people down east manage to get together in groups of more than four, to share good food and drink? Unless everyone has huge homes where they can often entertain 10-20 people easily. And everyone lives really, really close to each other so there are no snowy, bad roads to keep people away? After all, one of the best things about good food is sharing the experiences, isn't it?

Nov 13, 2013
Pat50 in Atlantic Canada

Foodie Angst about East Coast Canada Move

No, am not at all into snow mobiles. My memories were more of toboggans and skating on the Rideau Canal. Ah, well. But, yes, I have definitely realised that, if I want to eat well in retirement it needs to be somewhere in, or very near to Halifax, say, not more than 45 minutes drive - whatever communities that would take you to. I am judging by my distance here to Vancouver, which is the farthest I am willing to travel for special items. Mostly I like to shop within 10 mins of home and about once per month I go to the T&T which is about 30 mins away, so that is the distance I feel comfortable with. Then trips to Vancouver are maybe 3-6 months apart if there is something really special there. So I guess that is where we will be looking. Odd maybe (maybe not so odd?) but while I thought I was one of the only ones braving the move from west to east I now find that there are a fair number of former westcoast foodie types who have moved east, all of which gives me more confidence. Where there is demand, after all, ....

Nov 13, 2013
Pat50 in Atlantic Canada