c

Chefpaulo's Profile

Title Last Reply

Service Dogs Get Couple Kicked Out of Restaurant

...and the bartender asks, "Hey! Why the long face?"

about 8 hours ago
Chefpaulo in Food Media & News
1

Mainline Today reports Mainland Opening

How did Mainline Today get the news before we did?

There goes the neighborhood.
CP

about 11 hours ago
Chefpaulo in Philadelphia

Service Dogs Get Couple Kicked Out of Restaurant

You beat my exact sentiments by five hours, bobbert. I was thinking a numbered and bar coded picture ID of both dog and owner riveted to the harness should suffice. And, as a suburban Philly resident, I have yet to encounter this as a problem. In fact, I can't recall the last time I saw a service dog in a restaurant. SoCal pet owners must be modeling each others' behavior to avoid having pooch stay in a hot car.
CP

Mashed potatoes, heated milk question

Other than serving temperature, I've found the only difference is infusion of additional essences.

I love the Georges Perrier recipe that has a few Tbs. of chopped shallots briefly sauteed in hazelnut oil before adding the cream and heating just to a simmer. With a pinch of s&p, the cream/shallot liquid is then whisked in with the boiled and riced potatoes by hand to a fluffy consistency and served immediately. Minced fresh herbs and gravy at your discretion but not necessary.

CP

Does anyone own a vacuum sealer?

I'll go for fully frozen at -20 degrees F. All should be rock hard before you suck the air out. Otherwise, I've had my vacuum tray fill with juices from soups or beautiful pastries flattened to hockey pucks. FoodSaver works great if you allow foods to deep freeze overnight and seal the next morning.
CP

Aug 20, 2014
Chefpaulo in Cookware

What "typical American Foods" would you serve to foreigners?

Totally agree. If there is one representative American dinner, it would be a beautifully-bronzed Thanksgiving turkey with stuffing/filling/dressing (depending on your background), gravy, cranberry relish, sweet potatoes and regional vegetable embellishments. Pecan, apple or pumpkin pie and a couple of good domestic wines? That will be something for them to write home about.
CP

Tipping delivery or take out. Do you? How much?

Thank you, tamara. I may be cynical but how many tip jars are put there by owners who pocket the proceeds for themselves rather than share it with the undocumented employees they are concealing?

I retain my stance as the word "tip" is an 18th century acronym for "to insure promptness." You put your coin in the tip jar upon arrival for the barkeep to notice and you were served before those who did not.

Like you, I overtip regularly to young folks who are in school and give very generously for those servers who go out of their way. But to pay extra for picking up my own order....why don't they tip me for driving to their place over all others and we'll call it a draw?
CP

Aug 15, 2014
Chefpaulo in Not About Food

Philly chef comes clean about his addictions

It is akin to Neitzsche's question about which comes first: culture or language. I'll go for the some of each posit.

Culinary chefs have more need for activity and a risk taking temperament than do pastry chefs whose work is much more structured and formulaic with set time parameters. Pastry chefs also work in quieter settings with fewer staff and have less crises to manage.

The hours are a salient issue as there is nothing to do at 2:00 a.m. except go hang out with other chefs to bemoan bosses, customers, underlings and purveyors with several shots to calm the nerves. Pastry chefs have much more control over their product and far less pressure on a minute-by-minute basis. They can go home to bed while culinary colleagues are still in the frenzy of the evening.

I've seen a lot of mental instability with the culinary crowd as well. Not that anything is causative, but does the alcohol result in the externalized behavior or do the behavior impulses from the job pressure drive one to excessive self-medication?

Again, I'm not making generalizations, just sharing observations from interviewing hundreds from each orientation and hearing the follow up tales.
CP

Aug 12, 2014
Chefpaulo in Philadelphia

Philly chef comes clean about his addictions

Drug and alcohol abuse are frequent problems among culinary chefs who must work into the wee hours of the morning and have their recreation at after-hours clubs with other chefs where the only thing to do is drink.

Pastry chefs come in and do their thing early in the day and have a much more normal schedule. They do not have the pressure of cranking out dozens of dinner orders or dealing with disgruntled customer's demands. Pastry chefs get to go home and have dinner with the family.

From my experience in awarding over 50 culinary and pastry arts scholarships between 1996 and 2000 (and reading hundreds of applications), the two are very different personalities. Culinary scholarship applications were almost always hand written with cross-outs, underlining, scribbled arrows to previous statements and writing in the margins. Pastry applicants often submitted very orderly and neatly type written addenda to the application questions.

There is no rule of thumb here but I found the differences between the two very interesting. Culinary chefs (IMHO)have the more volatile temperaments and a more challenging life style for sure. Managing that stress is a much bigger issue for them.

Congratulations to you, Michael.
CP

Aug 12, 2014
Chefpaulo in Philadelphia
1

Lobster Bisque

I'll look, once I get my new scanner and can go through dad's (20K) slides. I remember this huge lobster laid out on the table surrounded by sculpted tropical fruit and greens.The tail looked to be two feet long.

As a pale second, I did have a lobster on Long Beach Island, New Jersey in 1978 that was just under 20 pounds. I do have pix of that. The purveyor said that weight and age are correlated so he figured the old man was hatched around 1911 and survived shells and depth charges of two world wars.

I still have his thumb claw as a revered souvenir.
CP

Aug 11, 2014
Chefpaulo in Home Cooking

Lobster Bisque

My family made many trips to the Caribbean in my youth and I could not tell the difference just from the tail meat. All was the same to me except for the absence of claws.

BTW, my dad was a USAID adviser to Viet Nam in 1973. After his three-month visit, his hosts gave him a farewell banquet featuring a 25-pound spiny lobster as the main course. Dad said it was the best he had ever had. I have pix somewhere in his slide files.I have never seen such a thing.
CP

Aug 10, 2014
Chefpaulo in Home Cooking

Wasted food due to guest taking too much -- any solutions?

I couldn't have said it better. She is undoing years of habit in estimating portion size and resultant effects on her satiety. It apparently got out of control and medical intervention was needed.
She'll learn eventually. For now, she needs encouragement and compliments on her progress.
CP

Does anyone own a vacuum sealer?

I'm on my second FoodSaver - the first one broke down and, upon explaining the situation to their customer service person AND it being three months out of warranty - I received a new one for a nominal charge.

My only caution is that the seals do not hold well for boiling. I've messed up a few soups and sauces by lifting the bag too quickly and having it break. Simmer and then drain off the water before opening over the saucepan. Otherwise, a much-used investment for almost 20 years.
CP

Aug 05, 2014
Chefpaulo in Cookware

Tomato agronomists, please respond

Thanks for trying. As for nightshade formations, I've often encountered them inside bell peppers but the tomato thing was totally new.
CP

Aug 05, 2014
Chefpaulo in Gardening

Mainland Inn

Any updates, Hounds?
CP

Aug 04, 2014
Chefpaulo in Philadelphia

byob chinese restaurant

Wow! Flashback time.

Does anyone remember a wine called Wan Fu? It was a Chardonnay designed to go with Chinese fare. I haven't seen it in 25 years. Is it still out there?
CP

Aug 04, 2014
Chefpaulo in Philadelphia

Tomato agronomists, please respond

Thanks gang. I have a major report to get out tomorrow and can't mess around now but I did get some close-up pix of the tomato and its internal growing partners. It is, however, a day old and not as sprightly as yesterday. Will post them if you want. Very new to me. I also put it in a freezer bag for anyone who wants to analyze the genomes.
CP

Aug 03, 2014
Chefpaulo in Gardening

Tomato agronomists, please respond

As a foodie in my sixth decade, having had a food technologist father and gourmet cook mother, and loving and eating luscious summer tomatoes all my life, I have never seen this before.

I cut into one yesterday only to find little white and green things thinking I had a wormy one. Putting on my glasses, I could see that all the seeds had seemingly sprouted into cotyledons. Getting tweezers, I pulled out some that were over 2 inches long - all curled around inside this otherwise unremarkable tomato - bearing twin leaves. Unprecedented for me. Furthermore, there were no surface indications of rot, incision or damage of any kind.

Did I get some kind of freak or is this some cross-breeding, hyper-germination whatever phenomenon worthy of a journal article? What genetic/chemical/temperature condition would have caused this? I await your sagacious input.
CP

Aug 03, 2014
Chefpaulo in Gardening

Food related television commercial failures

Come to think about it, Billy was *sniff* always a little *sniff* hyper.

As for worthless counter cloggers before the Rollie Eggie thingee, how about the Popiel In-The-Egg-Scrambler of about 45 years ago? Battery-powered rotating needle that punctured the egg and blended it so you didn't have to expend five seconds of wrist action. Less work for mother.
CP

Aug 03, 2014
Chefpaulo in Food Media & News

Food related television commercial failures

Ernst Rohm's test tube-developed great-grandson, rumor has it. Looks like the wicked witch of the Reich with his flying monkey pastries.

And I've never seen Loden in blue. Oh....he has to be color coordinated with the box of this processed crap. Can you think of a better way to get beat up than to go to school dressed like that?
CP

Smoked Oysters -- yummy ways to eat?

Smoked oysters were an after school treat with classmate, Walter, who introduced me to them in 6th grade (1962)when they were 19 cents a can. The vehicles of choice were Burry's Euphrates Sesame Crackers (long gone) with a dollop of sour cream and a pinch if salt.Two decades later, my brother updated the recipe to toss the drained oysters with shredded Romano and freshly-chopped dill. Both are staples at my gatherings, and sometimes a quick dinner complemented by a salad and a glass of chilled white.
CP

Aug 01, 2014
Chefpaulo in Home Cooking

When was the last time you cleaned your fridge?

I've been braining my strain for hours on how to beat "tiara polisher" to no avail. Peg Bracken would have loved you.
CP

Aug 01, 2014
Chefpaulo in General Topics

50 Comfort Foods for 50 States

Often out of it...but never far away.

My comments were made in the spirit of Joel Garreau's "The Nine Nations of North America" whose premise was that we are a continent of cultures irrespective of state and international boundaries. Living in eastern Pennsylvania, I have much more in common culturally with my friends in Toronto than I have with folks in Quebec, New Mexico or Louisiana. With the introduction of countless new instructional options via cable television and internet, the melding of these cultural influences makes identification of preferred food by political division a non sequitur. We migrate to other areas with increasing frequency and bring those influences with us.

The P.S. about the Dutch cuisine was to underscore. My Scottish/English grandmother, who has no identifiable Dutch heritage, made the exact same dinner mentioned by the hotel clerk. So, who is to say what is comfort food by locale?
CP

Jul 31, 2014
Chefpaulo in General Topics

50 Comfort Foods for 50 States

I don't know if comfort food geographic regions count as much as traditions from early memories. Cable, internet and mobility have pretty much fused national tastes over the last 30 years. We are all sharing grandma's secret recipe, or at least have seen some chef make a reasonable facsimile and given instructions on how to do the same.
CP

P.S. I was just reminded of my brother and I asking our (*gorgeous*) hotel desk clerk at the Hotel Schiller in Amsterdam where to go for authentic Dutch cuisine. Not that it ever crossed our minds what actually constitutes Dutch cuisine - or that we had ever encountered a Dutch restaurant...anywhere...we asked for her recommendation.
"What?" she says wrinkling up her nose. "You don't want to go out for Dutch food. That's what your grandmother used to make - roast chicken, mashed potatoes with gravy and green beans. You don't want to pay for that, do you???"

Upon her second recommendation, we opted for Indonesian Rijstafel and were glad we did.

But now we know what Dutch cuisine is.

Jul 30, 2014
Chefpaulo in General Topics

‘Food is Meant to Nourish, Not Entertain’

I didn't see that pic of him until just moments ago. He is scary. Would you trust your kid in the same room with him?

Before I believe anything he has to say about healthful eating, let's review his publications on shaving, shampooing, flossing and other daily practices that seem to have escaped his attention.
CP

P.S. Oooo...gross thought. I wonder what his kitchen looks like.

Jul 29, 2014
Chefpaulo in Food Media & News

What are you baking these days? July edition, part 2! [old]

Lemongirl, Would you do a short video on making this? Mine never looked this good....ever!

I can hear the crust crackle as I bite down on a slice slathered with soft plugra....or roasted garlic cloves.... or aged Roquefort.

Hmmmmm.....accompanied by a nice chilled Pinot Noir (yes, in the heat of summer I like a chill on my reds)and a Salade Nicoise...after the vichyssoise.

Followed up by a peach tart.... with home made peach ice cream.

Espresso and Armagnac afterward.

Now see what you've done!!!
CP

Jul 25, 2014
Chefpaulo in Home Cooking

How often do you drink at lunch during the work week?

I think it comes down to issues of age and metabolism.

Lunch back then.....
First job out of grad school in 1975, we'd all pile into the car, load up a couple of bowls, smoke all the way up to The Wagon Wheel, have a Scotch or bourbon while awaiting our cheese steaks and fries with a couple of beers, get back in the car, pass around another couple of bowls on the way back, arrive in the parking lot, pass around the Visine and Binaca and go back to work.

Lunch today.... I haven't smoked pot since the 90's, fruit and cottage cheese are preferred and one beer will have me asleep in six minutes.

Ahhhh....the good old days.

CP

P.S. And I kept that job for 12 years.

Jul 24, 2014
Chefpaulo in Not About Food

‘Food is Meant to Nourish, Not Entertain’

What a gawdawful PITA he must be at the dinner table.
CP

Food Scars - Things you will never eat again.

I had a similar experience with that stuff. Bartender at a picnic event made me a Sloe Comfortable Screw (sloe gin, Southern Comfort and O.J.) right before I had to pitch a softball game. We lost....big time.
CP

Jul 24, 2014
Chefpaulo in Not About Food

Memorable Quotes about booze

His other great retort after correction for a vulgar remark (not booze related but when he was likely under the influence) was:
Lady Astor: Why, Winston! If you were my husband, I'd put poison in your coffee.
Churchill: And if you were my wife, I WOULD DRINK IT.
CP

Jul 21, 2014
Chefpaulo in Food Media & News