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Modesto Korean Kitchen

You are correct, after my last post I did some more searching and found several posts on places like YELP that advised that Kim's in Atwater was still open.

The reviews all seemed to be very positive in that the place was still kind of a small hole in the wall restaurant located in a small strip mall, but the food tended to be great! I will take the time make a trip to Atwater, maybe with some friends, to give Kim's a try again.

There are several Japanese restaurants around Modesto that seem to be doing well, but guess Korean food has just not caught on that much yet. The bad reviews posted on the Korean Kitchen sure did not help the cause. The location was another negative factor.

Nov 18, 2012
Ronbo36 in California

Modesto Korean Kitchen

Sorry to report that the Korean Kitchen (AKA Korean BBQ) on Coffee Road has gone out of business due to a lack of customers to support it. The closest Korean Restaurants are now located in Stockton, Pleasanton, Santa Clara, and San Jose. There used to be a small Korean Restaurant in Atwater years ago that had very good food. Guess there are not that many people in and around Modesto that have a taste for Korean food...too bad, it's great. The local North China Restaurant on Standiford used to offer a great bowl of Korean Black Bean Noodles, but the new owners no longer offer it.

Nov 16, 2012
Ronbo36 in California

Best way to remove a non-stick from carbon steel?

Hi Java,

Thanks for the info on the Xylan coating. It does seem to be highly resistant to scratching and abrasion, but easily peels off during medium heat cooking (haven't figured that one out yet)?

Hi Chem,
No I am not looking for a project (the last thing I want or need), I just have never seen such a nice small (20cm) well made carbon steel wok before. But if I can't fix it, I will just toss it.

Thanks!
Ronbo

Aug 21, 2012
Ronbo36 in Cookware

Best way to remove a non-stick from carbon steel?

The wok is made by Ken Hom, and boasts that is made of Carbon Steel with a non-stick inner surface. The high heat had no effect on it, except to darken it a little. The steel brush on full speed did even less. I am kind of amazed at how well this wok is holding up, considering my efforts to remove the non-stick.

The label lists a contact number and email address for questions, so will check with them on the question of the surface under the non-stick (if I am able to remove it). There used to be a guy I knew who did some sand-blasting for me in years past...might check that out as a last resort..

A lot of fuss for a small wok.

Aug 21, 2012
Ronbo36 in Cookware

Best way to remove a non-stick from carbon steel?

I picked up a small carbon steel wok the other day that I really like, even though it had a Teflon non-stick coating on the inside. I thought I would just remove the non-stick surface when I figured out the best way to do so.

I used it about three times so far, just for small things...and in the process some of non-stick on the bottom surface is already chipping off by itself...I guess from just from the heat used?

I read that Easy-Off oven cleaner would easily remove the Teflon, so tried that tonight using the Heavy Duty Easy-Off spray. But after an hour of soaking in the spray it did not seem to have any effect on the non-stick surface.

My other options seem to be:

1. Get it really hot on my 12,000BTU wok stove, and see if the heat will cause it to peal off.
2. Use sand paper, and steel wool.
3. Try my electric drill with a steel wire brush wheel.

I was under the impression that it would not take much abuse to cause the non-stick to come off, but it seems to a little more resistant to removal than I anticipated. Any ideas or advice would be much appreciated.

Thanks!
Ronbo

Aug 21, 2012
Ronbo36 in Cookware

Do I need to re-season my wok?

Hi Mochi,

I’m far from an expert of this, since this was my first experience with a carbon steel wok. But for me the proof was in what my wok looked like after I cleaned it the second time (with the copper pad and the scouring powder).

The first time I cleaned it there was no noticeable difference in how it looked. The second time the outer coating was definitely gone, and I could see that I was now down to the carbon steel base metal.

Lastly, it just looked much better when I seasoned it again. The wok was evenly darkened this time, no junky looking areas.

For me it did not take that much time and effort to redo the process, and the end product was well worth it. Good luck, and good cooking, with your wok.

Ronbo

Aug 14, 2012
Ronbo36 in Cookware

Do I need to re-season my wok?

Hi CookingwithMochi,

When I cleaned my new carbon steel wok with just soap and water it did not touch the rust proof coating, and resulted in some caking on of the peanut oil and the coating. Not until I gave a it real good cleaning with a copper Brillo type pad, and scouring powder, did the gunk come off. Then it seasoned a lot easier. I’m not sure if you have the same problem with your wok, but it does look like you might still have some protective coating residue on the wok. That might account for the spots and uneven black areas on your wok in the photos. Just my humble opinion, hope it helps.

Ronbo

Aug 14, 2012
Ronbo36 in Cookware

Do I need to re-season my wok?

Thanks for the help in addressing my wok dilemma. I did as you suggested, and first rubbed it with oil and coarse salt. That removed some of it; next I hit it with the copper scrubber, and then tried a BBQ scrapper with a steel brush. But the junk on the bottom refused to come off, so my last attempt was with ‘Kleen King’ (a commercial grade powder cleaner that has a little more cleaner power than the average scouring powder), and the copper scrubber. That removed everything, so I repeated the process on the outside. While doing so it became apparent that I probably had not completely cleaned off all the protective coating in the beginning, because this time I was looking at the actual base carbon steel surface…and it looked much different (better).

Also, I think I used too much oil the first time around, and that coupled with the protective coating that remained, maybe caused the caked on look.

The photos below show the wok after I cleaned it; after 10”, and the last after 15” on full heat.

I used a piece of oiled paper towel (with tongs) to keep the surface oiled. It looks a lot better this time, no caked on look, and I guess will just take time to fully blacken. I have a round bottom wok on order that I will be seasoning in the near future, and just for drill I thought I might give the cast iron wok that Eleanor Hoh is promoting on her Wok Star website a try. I will certainly have an assortment of woks to try and compare.

Aug 12, 2012
Ronbo36 in Cookware

Do I need to re-season my wok?

Thanks for your response, here are two photos that I took of the new wok.

Aug 11, 2012
Ronbo36 in Cookware

Do I need to re-season my wok?

I bought a new Carbon steel wok today, and decided not to wait for the delivery of the new Itwani12000 BTU wok stove (recommended on the Wok Stars) that I bought on Amazon, and went ahead and tried to season it with the lower BTU rated butane stove that I already have. I read that sometimes they are able to do the job OK, and was anxious to get started.

I washed and scrubbed the new wok with a copper scrubber, then dried and wiped it inside and out with peanut oil. I heated it at full flame for about 10” (until the bottom started to blacken). Then wiped it out and repeated the process again for 15”. But the bottom still did not look like it was really a well seasoned black like I expected, and it had no affect on the inside sides of the wok, even though I applied heat to the sides also.

Lastly, I heated it up again and stir fried chopped onions in it for 15”, (I read that onions can add to the seasoning process, and the taste), then tossed the onions.

But the bottom still did not look right to me, it seemed to have a burned on oil crust on the bottom? I stir fried some onions and mushroom with rice, and it tasted OK, but started to stick to the pan before I was done cooking it. I added a little more wok oil, and some hot oil, but that made it a little oily when it was done. It tasted OK, but now I am wondering if I should try to scrub clean the wok, and season it again when I get my new wok stove in 2-3 weeks?

I also picked up a very small 20cm Ken Hom wok that is carbon steel, but has a non-stick coating on the inside. I thought it might be handy for small meals or snacks, and that I could use a wire brush (on my electric drill) to remove the non-stick coating if I don’t like it, then season it also.

For years I used a stainless steel wok that served me well, then an enameled iron wok, so switching over to the carbon steel is a new experience for me. I have read a lot of posts on this website, and on YouTube about seasoning a wok…but still not sure I am doing things correctly. So I am wide open for any input. Thanks for a great website!

Aug 11, 2012
Ronbo36 in Cookware

Anolon cookware and PFOA's

I have a set of Anolon cookware, and am concerned about ingesting any of the non-stick coating that has been slowly removed from the bottom surface of the cookware during cooking.

I only use nylon utensils, and hand wash the cookware, but the bottom of the wok, and of the other pots and pans still show many small scratches and chips. I have searched the Internet, but can't find any info addressing this problem. I would appreciate any input on this topic.

Also, I am in the process of switching to either carbon steel, or ceramic coated cookware that is PSOA free. I noticed the blog on this website concerning Japanese made "SS" brand carbon steel cookware, anybody know what the brand name "SS" stands for?

I followed the offered links to the Japanese stores that were suggested as a source, but could not find anything offered by that name. There was some Yamada cookware offered that looked like it might be good.

Aug 05, 2012
Ronbo36 in Cookware