chartreauxx's Profile

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Toronto Hound Summer Re-Visit - Need another round of recommendation and critique.

noodle boat in issaquah (thai) and clay oven (indian, SUPER sweet owners! they once tried to take my father in for the night when he was driving home from skiing in blizzard conditions) in woodinville are good casual options on the east side. barking frog in woodinville is tasty but IMHO overpriced for what you get, largely due to location. in seattle for lunch additional options i missed would include little uncle (thai), browsing the market until you found something that piqued your interest, the fremont sunday market food trucks, savatdee (thai/lao), and il corvo (pasta in pioneer square). steelhead diner does a really good gumbo or clam chowder (pike place market - affordable with a nice view if you stick to the awesome soup entrees), and lost pelican (3pm-on) in belltown does a slightly more upscale version of creole cuisine (happy hour used to be awesome, but the portions have been scaled down. if you decide to go for it, think brunch). list (belltown) is also good for happy hour but it's pretty trendy so tread carefully - it can be crowded and i don't love paying full price when happy hour is all day sun-mon and i pay 2x+ with noisy crowds outside of quiet hours.

chan in the market can offer an upscale korean experience that is pretty delicious in a very intimate setting. reservations recommended.

about 20 hours ago
chartreauxx in Greater Seattle

Kind bars & nutrition

this is complete rubbish. when one agency is busy slapping a gold star on kraft singles "cheese product" for being a "healthful food" (food here used loosely it seems), i cringe to see a product that while still a processed item, is actually pretty nourishing, being slammed for the fact that it has "too much saturated fat". hey, 1985 called, they want their diet trend back. heavens to betsy, let's all eat more "healthful" fake cheese food and fewer "unhealthful" nut/fruit bars. sheesh.

Authentic Chinese, any region

similar concerns. i've never been overwhelmed by guo kui, and i always found yang's noodles to be his standout dishes. but i guess we'll find out come summer....!

Apr 22, 2015
chartreauxx in Greater Seattle

Toronto Hound Summer Re-Visit - Need another round of recommendation and critique.

i'd add rockcreek, mistral, art of the table, restaurant zoe, tilth, shiro's, monsoon (i like the menu better at their bellevue location), joule, nishino, staple and fancy, quinn's, spur, agrodolce, the whale wins, the walrus and the carpenter, miyabi 45th and harvest vine to the list.

for lunch, consider salumi, le pichet (quiche or the charcuterie platter, onion soup or raclette plate if they still have it on the menu), thai curry simple, la isla (good for dinner too but not upscale), pear delicatessen or los agaves (in pike place market), duck soup from noodle zone in the westlake mall food court, pho than brothers for pho, taste of india (ravenna/udistrict), the masonry (lower queen anne) for totally bomb pizza.

Apr 22, 2015
chartreauxx in Greater Seattle

Uses for dry mashed potatoes

the entire oven unit went out; no burners/stovetop, no oven. i'm not an electrician, but the landlady had the entire thing replaced, for which i was grateful.

Apr 21, 2015
chartreauxx in Home Cooking

Uses for dry mashed potatoes

you can:
donate them
make gnocchi
coat crispy fish
bread fried veggies (ie, onion rings, okra)
thicken soups or gravy
make fritters
bake with them

instant mashers aren't that bad eaten as-is, even (albeit highly processed). they were a life-saver for me when my oven died and all i had to cook with for a couple weeks was hot water (until the oven unit could be replaced)!

Apr 21, 2015
chartreauxx in Home Cooking

Authentic Chinese, any region

agreed. i think cheng biao yang's variable involvement really contributes to the variable experiences at SC and ST. (that's why i noted that the experience at those places is very hit/miss, though when they're on they are amazing.) i hear he's opening a new spot this summer in pike place market, too.

Apr 21, 2015
chartreauxx in Greater Seattle

How to word invitation- not paying for drinks

talk to the restaurant/bar. maybe you can arrange to purchase "drink tickets" in advance, and distribute those to guests (maybe an invite like "please join us for [name]'s birthday! [#] drink tickets will be provided per RSVPd guest. we look forward to seeing you there!").

Authentic Chinese, any region

other than dough zone:

facing east (taiwanese)
din tai fung (dumplings/dim sum; order the spicy pork+shrimp wontons and the crispy gyoza, the "juicy pork dumplings" are fine but nothing overly special)
spicy talk (i've had both great and terrible experiences, so it's hit or miss)
szechuan chef (see spicy talk - YMMV)

in all cases you should do your research to know what to order. all places listed offer some authentic dishes, and some more tailored to an american palate for reasons of income.

Apr 20, 2015
chartreauxx in Greater Seattle

Do pregnant Japanese women eat sushi?

my friends all continued to eat basically as they did before being pregnant, with the exception of most of them reduced their alcohol consumption (though most continued with 1-2 drinks a week if they felt like it). they never seemed to have any concerns about eschewing fish, raw or otherwise. your mileage may vary; i think, like anything medical/pregnant, it's a highly personal decision and one best considered with your ob/gyn. so, this is *NOT* medical advice, just what i observed among my pregnant friends and colleagues while living in japan (rural akita prefecture, on the sea of japan).

Gendering of Food

sad, perhaps; but speaking as someone who had a reasonably severe eating disorder (in my mid-twenties i bottomed out at 70lbs/5'6" and got sent to residential treatment), body image issues are rarely a "voluntary" thing. your friend's struggles may be more deeply rooted than you think, and she may be wishing the same as you - that someday, she can order something simply because she wants it, without needing any additional reason or excuse. i can understand how it may be exhausting to listen to her justifications, but that may be her outlet for "allowing" herself to eat the food in question. maybe it's annoying, or self-indulgent, but i would encourage patience in this case. give yourself the grace of rising above it, and give her the grace (and room) to do what she needs to do.

Apr 13, 2015
chartreauxx in General Topics

Gendering of Food

agree it's not conclusive proof, but that is interesting. i could probably be talked into considering the notion that female biology (higher calcium/iron/etc needs, higher body fat, etc) could contribute to craving foods high in such nutrients, more easily than i could be persuaded that women are more drawn to "sweets" than men are. but of course, as noted, such studies are ethically dubious and challenging to execute.

interesting anecdote, however.

Seattle Donuts

i personally prefer them. all are well-cooked, but witness uses house fruit preserves as the sauce which i prefer to toulouse petit's coffee sauce. all 3 i listed use more powdered sugar than toulouse petit, which is a personal preference. where ya at matt is sometimes have seasonal flavored beignets like pumpkin, so the experiment is worth it IMO :-)

Apr 09, 2015
chartreauxx in Greater Seattle

Seattle Donuts

daily dozen is in the vestibule-type part of the market right by delaurenti market. walking your bike in might be a bit awkward, but not nearly as bad as the heart of the indoor market.

Apr 09, 2015
chartreauxx in Greater Seattle

Seattle Donuts

most aren't "donut shops" per se, but i like the zeppole at tavolata in belltown. revel in fremont usually has a good 1-3 donuts on offer at brunch (typically a mix of savory and sweet). lost pelican in belltown offers good beignets, as does food truck where ya at matt, and witness (in capitol hill). daily dozen doughnut co. in pike place market hasn't disappointed me yet. i don't care much one way or the other for mighty-o donuts, but they have a loyal following and a lot of local coffee shops/vendors stock them. metropolitan market has always had serviceable (not sure of source) donuts in their bakery case (i shop the the lower queen anne/mercer location).

Apr 09, 2015
chartreauxx in Greater Seattle

Ketchup on Eggs? Not in my House!...Yours?

ok, now big tobacco has *REALLY* gone too far! ;-)

Gendering of Food

it's a chicken-egg question. do women naturally gravitate towards such foods and men don't, or are women taught to gravitate towards such foods and men not to? it's extremely difficult to divorce nature from nurture in such cases. correlation is not causation, and to rule out the "wallpaper" of society that reinforces such notions (or may have trained them in in the first place) seems overly simplistic to me. in order to determine biological basis, one would be required to place human infants in a complete cultural vacuum and observe their eating preferences over time into adulthood (obviously unethical), so it's nigh impossible to determine biology vs conditioning here.

Old school table manners... what were you taught? update

in the states for thai food, most people seem to either 1) use chopsticks for everything, or 2) use a fork exactly as normal for them. personally, i've never seen anybody of thai descent take offense. barring culturally egregious errors (like standing chopsticks up in rice or stabbing items with the 'sticks, or just generally eating like a pig utensils notwithstanding), most people are fairly patient and accepting. when i was living in thailand, i was given some gentle guidance, but my errors were met most with sincere and welcoming mild amusement. some thai dishes are even intended to be "finger food", scooped up with a tightly packed wad of thai sticky rice. during the pre-colonial period (ie, before the introduction of western utensils), using sticky rice as the "scoop" a la injeera in ethiopian food, was the norm throughout most of thailand.

Apr 08, 2015
chartreauxx in Not About Food

Old school table manners... what were you taught? update

good to know! i'm never quite sure what to do when served a dish that requires no cutting. i always hold my fork between thumb+forefinger+middle finger, but when eating knifeless will typically eat tines up in the right hand (no shovel grip though!).

thai tradition dictates that the spoon remain in the right hand, using the fork in the left to scoop food onto the spoon. so you had the absolute right of it. in modern times, it has become more acceptable to use the spoon in the left hand if that is your dominant hand. chopsticks may be provided for (usually chinese-derived) noodle dishes; if so, use them, but do not request them if they are not offered. of course, even in thailand, most thai people will be more amused than offended if a foreigner should make a sincere faux pas/do something that to them seems odd (much the same as europeans and americans are usually more baffled/amused at utensil differences than they are offended). thai restaurants here in the states don't think twice about people asking for/eating with chopsticks, or using the left hand utensil (fork or spoon) to deliver food to the mouth.

Apr 08, 2015
chartreauxx in Not About Food

Gendering of Food

i know, i was totally bummed. my dad was generous enough to go splitsies with me, but i still couldn't stop thinking, "y'know, if i were a man, i bet i wouldn't've been given a salad!"

too bad for the proprietor, my parents were offended enough on my behalf (the ride route was an hour+ trip for me vs 15min for them) to stop patronizing him. he went under a few months later. what goes around, comes around!

Apr 08, 2015
chartreauxx in General Topics

Gendering of Food

i cut off my cable tv subscription so i didn't know about the cam newton swap (nor do i know who cam newton is or what he looks like - googling now). i suspect in this case (yogurt), it's a result of relative market saturation among women and an attempt to draw in new consumers (men).

that said, the bobby flay fage ads have him doing it "cheffily" from scratch, and then the ad points out that "hey! this is a convenient product pre-packed for the home cook!" so i'm conflicted re: that point. as i began my post, though, i actually think gendered foods are quite a bit in flux these days. some things seem less quick to go than others.

last summer i took a bike ride with my parents. we stopped at a small french-inspired restaurant in the wine valley near their house. when ordering, my dad and i just asked the chef to serve us "his recommendation". he was happy to oblige. imagine my disappointment when my father was served an opulent duck dish, and i received a caesar salad - one without even a protein on it (i'm female). i definitely felt discriminated against.

also, i find it funny when my boyfriend and i order coffee. i'll get a 12oz triple shot americano, no room for cream; he'll have a mocha or a cappuccino. if it's a table service place, guess who gets served my americano almost every time? >_<

Apr 08, 2015
chartreauxx in General Topics

Old school table manners... what were you taught? update

as an american who generally eats continental style, i have a question. if i'm eating a bowl of something like pasta where nothing needs to be cut, i forgo the knife altogether and just use my right hand with the fork. is this considered peculiar by europeans and/or other americans? for example, if i'm eating a plate/bowl of farfalle pasta with shelless shrimp and bite-size veggies, i'll probably use just my right hand and a fork since nothing needs cutting.

Apr 08, 2015
chartreauxx in Not About Food

Gendering of Food

i think some of these are currently somewhat in flux; women eating paleo so lots of meat, men low-carbing so ordering salads, men going vegan or gluten-free, women ordering bacon and burgers, etc are sort of mainstreaming out of what used to be pretty rigid gendered roles.

however, i do think some associations remain pretty firm...
1) portion sizes: women are dainty and do not finish even smaller portions. men clean their huge plates.
2) yogurt is for women: the john stamos stuff mentioned above seems to me more aimed at *women* by flashing up a male sex symbol to draw sales.
3) food to serve to others (as in, cooking for a family) is marketed at women.
4) low-, no-, or reduced-calorie products are aimed at women.
5) fast food/chain commercials target almost all offerings at men (taco bell, carl's jr), unless they're pushing a new grilled/salad/"healthy" option.
6) sweet treats are usually targeted at women (ice cream, etc) especially the "reduced guilt" versions.
7) fiber is for women.
8) beer and alcohol commercials overwhelmingly target men, portraying women as sex objects.
9) men grill, women do everything else, men don't bake and women don't bbq.
10) "real men don't eat quiche."

i'd suggest maybe focusing exclusively on gender divisions in food advertising, given the relatively small scope of this paper. pulling up food commercials on youtube will provide a lot of material in a pretty quick/easy to consume format, not to mention help prevent a 6-7 pager from suffering because of trying to take on a *REALLY* big topic without clear demarcations as to what you're looking into.

Apr 08, 2015
chartreauxx in General Topics

SEA foodie visit

oh really?! i can only afford such places when my parents are taking me out, my bad on not noticing the closure. *embarrassed face*

Apr 06, 2015
chartreauxx in Greater Seattle

QUICHE! Home Cooking Dish of the Month (April 2015)

the quiche recipe i inherited from my mom is cubed jarlsberg, cubed canadian bacon (or boneless ham), 3 large eggs, 1.5 cups cream, pinch of nutmeg, and salt and (white if worried about aesthetics) pepper to taste, dotted with butter in julia child's pie crust (blind-baked to a light gold). it's super creamy and nicely cheesy-gooey. we usually ate it with a caesar salad and sliced baguette+butter for dinner, leftovers for lunch the next day. first, cube up ham and cheese; next, pie crust into the oven with pie weights; then, blend cream and eggs for the quiche batter. after that (and with pie shell out of the oven of course), meat+cheese into pie shell, pour egg mixture over, dot with cubed butter, and into a 350F oven for 30-45 minutes. should still jiggle when removed from oven. allow to cool 20-30 minutes, then slice and serve. tastes like home :-)

SEA foodie visit

as a belltowner, i rely on the 8 for capitol hill, the light rail from westlake center (1 mile walk from my belltown home, though connecting buses are an option) for the i-district and anything south thereof, any one of the 545/71/72/73 buses for the u-district (likewise a 1 mile walk, though there are buses you can take and transfer from should you wish), the 5 or the 28 for fremont, and a handful more of direct shots. it's a more accessible neighborhood than it may at first appear :-). this is just to name a few. and belltown in its own right does have some pretty awesome food; it's also walking distance to south lake union, which offers establishments like shanik (upscale indian food).

Apr 06, 2015
chartreauxx in Greater Seattle

SEA foodie visit

no, not true. lower queen anne means you can take the 8 bus direct into capitol hill; you just have to walk to denny way or to queen anne ave n. you also have good access to the d line rapid ride to ballard-ish zone. mediterranean inn comes to mind as a viable option with good access to both queen anne ave n or the denny stops (both bus #8) with just a short walk, or you could air bnb somewhere in belltown/LQA.

Apr 05, 2015
chartreauxx in Greater Seattle

SEA foodie visit

where to stay? try airbnb - some great deals, locations and units. i'd recommend somewhere in downtown or belltown, because public transit from westlake station will get you anywhere in the city pretty quickly.

food:

downtown/belltown/lower queen anne:
le pichet (breakfast-dinner, new french)
list (new american, for happy hour)
japonessa (happy hour is almost all day; fusion sushi+japonessa)
:chan (upscale korean/korean northwest fusion)
shiro's (classic sushi)
piroshky piroshky (snack, or breakfast/light lunch)
le panier (french pastries, coffee)
tavolata (northwestern italian; happy hour is a bomb deal)
bang bang cafe (sandwiches/wraps; lunch or breakfast)
cafe goldinblack (homey korean)
the masonry (oven-fired neopolitan pizza and craft beer list)
the innkeeper (modern latin american, gorgeous patio)
il bistro (upscale classic italian, very romantic)

fremont/ballard/wallingford:
walrus and the carpenter (oysters and northwestern american fare)
the whale wins (new american
senor moose (classic mexican)
kwanjai thai (owner is the sweetest ever!)
fremont sunday market vendors (food carts and random shopping)
roxy's diner (east coast/jewish-american style diner)
rockcreek (upscale new american seafood)
pecado bueno (low-key taqueria-ish american-mexican, cheap good margaritas, nice patio)

capitol hill:
monsoon (upscale modern vietnamese)
oddfellows cafe (modern american)
little uncle (hole in the wall thai)
quinn (pacific northwestern)

international district:
harbor city (dim sum)
kau kau (chinese bbq)
uwajimaya (huge asian supermarket: food court is so-so but take a spin around and maybe buy some snacks to try! or just ogle the products)
thai curry simple

Sanctuary or Bachelor Farmer

i thoroughly disliked bachelor farmer; overpriced, hipstery, stingy portions and thoroughly mediocre food. never been to sanctuary, but i wouldn't recommend BF.

Dyed Easter Eggs

DIY easter egg "die" on the front page...? seriously?

Apr 02, 2015
chartreauxx in Recipes