s

sueatmo's Profile

Title Last Reply

Newbie here: Collective wisdom re ceramic cooktops

I don't think you have a ceramic cooktop. You have a glass cooktop, at least in the current terminology. The old pyroceram cooktops, as the ones made by Corning, have gone the way of the dodo. They were hard to keep clean, for one thing.

I used a glass cooktop from 1999-2012. Then for three months I lived in an apartment and I used a coil range. I noted that they worked very much alike. The hob heats, then cycles off, then heats, then cycles off. The heat is not constant. The hobs take a while to heat up, then take a while to cool down. I learned to use medium heat for everything.

A post on this site helped me learn to wait for a skillet surface to heat up enough for a water drop to ball up and sizzle. Then add fat, and food. I pretty much did that for a number of years, and I recommend that for a glass or smoothtop range.

I also learned here that you can heat one burner to high, use the pot or pan, all the while preheating another burner to low or med. Then switch to the lower burner when you need to pull back on the high heat. I did not master that technique, but it sounds like it would work.

You can use iron on the glass top. I wouldn't slide it around too much, but they will withstand some sliding. Obviously you don't want to drop it on the top.

When you have found, saved or otherwise obtained enough funds, you can switch to induction or gas. They are better cooking methods than the smoothtops. There are threads here about the characteristics of induction. I think gas cooktops work great too. I moved into a house in 2012 with an ugly, badly maintained glass cooktop. We replaced it with an induction cooktop, and I absolutely love it. But I cooked successfully for years with a glasstop, and I think you can too.

You will have to clean it daily though.

13 minutes ago
sueatmo in Cookware

Newbie here: Collective wisdom re ceramic cooktops

Because those of us who hang out here are cool! At least we like to think so.

26 minutes ago
sueatmo in Cookware

Does parking make a difference for you ?

I hate messed up parking lots! I try to park in the same line of cars every time I visit the grocery store. And if I have to dodge traffic (lookin' at you Fred Meyer!) I really don't want to go there.

For me it isn't so much about a lot being packed, as it is how the parking lot is organized. Most of the stuff in most grocers is the same, and it is often priced similarly too. There aren't too many reasons for me to visit the messed up parking lot, if I can visit a place with an organized lot.

28 minutes ago
sueatmo in Not About Food
1

Final day tomorrow. Need to decide pots and pans

Since you are not an "amazing" cook, which description I take to mean you are not terribly experienced, I think you should buy the AC pan you like, get one medium saucepot with lid, an iron skillet and perhaps a non-stick skillet. You can do a lot with these. When you are ready to do slow braises, chili and stews, you can buy a Dutch oven. If you decide you need to boil water for tea or other things, you can choose a teakettle or small sauce pot. When you want to learn sauces, you can buy a saucier. But you might not want all A-C or Zwilling.

If you must have a set, then I don't see anything wrong with Zwilling or AC.

Your pots don't have to match. But they do need to be nicely balanced, with comfy handles and they should be made really well. In general I recommend buying the best you can afford, but for someone not as experienced, I think taking your time to choose each best pot is best. You might not know what you really want until you are doing more cooking. But, obviously, I don't recommend buying cheap, flimsy stuff.

1 day ago
sueatmo in Cookware

What do you keep stocked at home?

I like to have seasonal fruit. An apple or a peach or some grapes are great snacks.

I like to have canned tomatoes on hand, cottage cheese, sandwich cheese, grated cheese, mayo and other condiments, all natural peanut butter and jam for each of us.

I like having a couple or three sorts of rice, as well. For Mr.Sueatmo, I keep packs of instant mashed potatoes.

All-Clad Saute + Electric Coil Stove = Worthwhile?

I think you'll do fine. So many new cooks want to buy sets. As you might have noticed, most of us here discourage that. May you and your pan form a wonderful relationship!

Jul 25, 2015
sueatmo in Cookware

Cooks in transition: how are you changing?

I love this!

Jul 25, 2015
sueatmo in Home Cooking

Cooks in transition: how are you changing?

Thanks! We buy more things we really like, just because, too. We are two seniors living together. I've never, ever bought a lobster though.

I am so happy you are eating really well.

Jul 24, 2015
sueatmo in Home Cooking

Cooks in transition: how are you changing?

So sorry about your DH's illness. And you are right to write down those tried and true recipes. I imagine your DH is well taken care of. Blessings.

Jul 24, 2015
sueatmo in Home Cooking

Cooks in transition: how are you changing?

Techniques, such as ? What are you doing that is new?

Jul 23, 2015
sueatmo in Home Cooking

Cooks in transition: how are you changing?

I had a great cup of black tea this afternoon. Good stuff.

Jul 23, 2015
sueatmo in Home Cooking
1

Cooks in transition: how are you changing?

Good stuff!

Jul 23, 2015
sueatmo in Home Cooking

Cooks in transition: how are you changing?

Yes! So true about fast food. Cooking well makes you realize how awful some fast food, and even some restaurant food is. And what you do at home is usually better for you too.

I only have a few "banked" dishes that I make from my childhood. Even if you did have family recipes, cooking has changed so much in the last 20-30 years, you probably wouldn't even like them any more. At least that is my experience. I never eat jello salads any more, and they were a staple for me as a child.

Thanks for sharing.

Jul 23, 2015
sueatmo in Home Cooking

Cooks in transition: how are you changing?

It has occurred to me that my cooking styles have changed throughout my cooking life. I know that I started to change once we retired, and certainly before that when the kids were gone for good. Now, after eight years of retirement, I feel that I've transitioned beyond what I ever expected. I simply am cooking less, as in less food, fewer long recipes, and fewer dishes per meal. I actually was thinking recently that I needed to start making more sandwiches for meals! (Not normal for me.)

The biggest reasons for these changes are dietary, and my desire for raw fruits and veggies. And my personal taste, as in my actual tasting, has changed.

I'm doing "bowls" now because they are so easy to do and because, to me, they taste so good. And each of us can personalize them to our taste with condiments. And I'm doing simple stovetop braising now. And, we are eating salads topped with protein frequently. DH is mastering grilling, something he never did before. We eat grilled a lot. With some sort of raw veggie. Sometimes we do without a starch. (I do without a starch frequently, but even DH does too sometimes.)

In other words we are eating simpler than ever before.

Are any of you seniors experiencing this? Any new empty nesters changing? Are any of you becoming more experimental, or are you transitioning to new diet regimens? Do any of you cook more than before?

Jul 23, 2015
sueatmo in Home Cooking
1

Post your second half 2015 cookware and kitchen deals and finds here.

That's really nice! And very pretty too.

Jul 20, 2015
sueatmo in Cookware
1

Substitute for cilantro?

I have read that celery leaves can be subbed for cilantro. But if you don't like it, just add a bit more fresh oregano or parsley and I think your dish will be fine. Half the time I leave cilantro off because I forget to buy it.

Jul 18, 2015
sueatmo in Home Cooking

The perfect handle

The best handles I've experienced came on Cuisinart pots that are no longer made. The line was Everyday Stainless. They were well made pots with copper sandwiched between bottom layers of stainless and wonderful, fat, rolled handles which stayed cool. I loved those fat cylindrical handles.

When I replaced those pans because I got induction, I bought a Sitram Profiserie saute pan with a thick bottom aluminum disk which is somehow made magnetic, and a lovely rolled handle.

http://www.amazon.com/Sitram-Profiser...

This handle also stays cool. So for me, my preferred handle is somewhat fat and hollow, which allows it to stay somewhat cool when in use. It also helps if the pan is well balanced.

I also have some older iron skillets, and I have to say that the handles are not great, don't stay cool, and require careful handling over a glass cooktop. They have different, special properties though that make them useful.

Jul 16, 2015
sueatmo in Cookware

Post your second half 2015 cookware and kitchen deals and finds here.

Some day you'll need it.

Jul 16, 2015
sueatmo in Cookware
1

Induction Cooking: Is it really more energy efficient? (US Dept of Energy)

Duffy: I hear you about the wok. My cast iron wok heats up too fast. I don't use the highest heat setting with it. But I use a regular old flat bottomed wok. I certainly do have more that an inch of heated metal at the bottom of it. And it seems to work fine.

I learned to wok on a gas stove, with a plain old steel wok + ring. When I moved to all electric, I had to get used to a flat bottomed wok. Even then it wasn't/isn't perfect, because it shifts around. But it does work.

I wonder why you are using a round bottomed wok? Or have I misunderstood?

Jul 16, 2015
sueatmo in Cookware

Induction Cooking: Is it really more energy efficient? (US Dept of Energy)

I think that might be the best of both worlds for many cooks. And because I haven't used gas in decades, could you tell us when you would use a gas hob as opposed to induction? I know that for fast heat up of a pot of water, and for a low simmer, induction can't be beat. Would you use a gas hob for saute? Or something else?

Jul 15, 2015
sueatmo in Cookware

Induction Cooking: Is it really more energy efficient? (US Dept of Energy)

<The problem comes when we want to look beyond our houses. At this moment in US, I believe the energy conversion efficiency to convert oil/gas/coal to electricity at our power plants is about 60%. 40% goes to waste and heat up the environment.>

On this, I think you have a valid point, if indeed your numbers are correct--and I have no reason to doubt them.

However, I must confess that this factor wasn't even in my head when I chose induction, and I suspect I am not in the minority that way. If energy costs are factored in at all, I suspect people simply consider which energy source will cost less to them. I don't even know the answer for myself, frankly.

But much of the electric power, if not most, is generated in the PNW by hydro. There are environmental costs to that, but I don't know how to compare it to other sources of electricity.

Jul 15, 2015
sueatmo in Cookware

Induction Cooking: Is it really more energy efficient? (US Dept of Energy)

Sorry about the mixup. I was in too much of a hurry.

Jul 15, 2015
sueatmo in Cookware

Induction Cooking: Is it really more energy efficient? (US Dept of Energy)

All of this doesn't matter, does it? Those of us who like induction like it for more than one reason. Honestly, energy efficiency isn't the big reason I have it. But using induction does keep the kitchen cooler in summer, and it works really, really well.

For those of us who don't have gas, induction is a great alternative. I could get an induction cooktop that fit exactly into the cut out for my old smooth cooktop. The price was comparable as it would have been for getting a gas line + gas cooktop. It might have been less, if I were to have gone for a higher quality gas cooktop. Many of us have made this choice for similar reasons.

Why is this such a big issue for you K? No one wants you to change. But, last I heard it is a free country. You can choose to cook using your fuel of choice. For those of us with electric kitchens, induction is a superior choice to all others. If one has the luxury of choosing between gas and electric, then that is great. One should choose the type of cooking appliance one wants. In a perfect world, maybe I would have induction + gas. But that isn't an option for me, or most of us.

Jul 14, 2015
sueatmo in Cookware

What are some ingredients you don't like to use?

I dislike raisins and I avoid using them. I have no idea why, but it is lifelong. I Also dislike dried cranberries.

I don't fix Swiss chard. This may have something to do with encountering it on a hot day in a garden when I was pregnant. Whatever it is, I don't buy it.

I don't want to prepare, cook or taste turnips.

I find tofu disgusting, and I never purchase or prepare it.

I do not want to use any processed cheese, such as Velveeta. I do not buy regular American cheese because I dislike it.

I avoid using tomato paste or tomato sauce, due to higher carb values.
And I've actually grown to dislike the stuff.

I have no idea how to prepare any shellfish. So I don't buy.

I avoid Miracle Whip because I don't like the taste.

I avoid cheap pastries because of the high carbs and also because most cheap pastry tastes awful.

I avoid buying Folger's ground coffee, or similar, because I don't like it.

I can't imagine why anyone would buy buy premade iced tea, especially if it is highly sweetened, because I don't like sweetened tea and because it is simplicity itself to make it.

Jul 09, 2015
sueatmo in General Topics

Can you make whole grain pizza crust that is crispy?

http://sallysbakingaddiction.com/home...

I found this for you. The writer indicates that cornmeal on the pan helps to create a "crispy" crust.

The pedant in me wants to correct every use of "crispy" to crisp. But it might be a good recipe.

Jul 09, 2015
sueatmo in Home Cooking

Which knife is 40.0% heavier than the other?

I don't think I'd like a handle-heavy knife either. Too tiring when one has to do a lot of slicing and dicing for a dish.

I do love my Henckels Twin chef's knife. For me it is just right.

Jul 08, 2015
sueatmo in Cookware

All-Clad Saute + Electric Coil Stove = Worthwhile?

If you can afford the pan and it feels good in your hands, I'd keep it. You don't have to buy AC everything you know. And a chef's pan is very versatile. You'll still have this twenty years from now, if you take reasonable care of it.

Many of us do not like the handles on AC. Since you are new to cooking, you could teach yourself to pick up the handle from beneath, as if you were lifting a hand weight. I think it is too late to retrain those of use who have been using more comfy handled pots for a lot of years. But, for you, it could work.

Jul 08, 2015
sueatmo in Cookware

Which knife is 40.0% heavier than the other?

OK, from earlier posts I learn it is the handle that makes the difference. The top knife has a much heavier handle.

What I noticed was that the bottom knife has a stamped blade. Or I should say, the top knife has a forged blade which means there is more metal in the knife around the handle. Also, I note that the blade in the top knife goes all the way through the handle. I can't see if the blade in the bottom knife does so. But in the first knife, the added weight of the blade in the handle would make the handle heavier, no?

Jul 06, 2015
sueatmo in Cookware

The best thing I ate on the 4th was.....

No pics, but we had awesome hot dogs bought from our local butcher on really nice whole wheat buns. I like a standard hot dog; I only ask for brown mustard and sweet pickle relish. Mine was excellent.

I also made a salad and a cake and topped it with fresh sliced peaches.

Our feast was purposely low key and easy. But I thoroughly enjoyed it.

Jul 05, 2015
sueatmo in General Topics

Is it okay to ask guests at a suprise party to pay to attend?

No. The request is unreasonable. When you throw a party for someone, you foot the bill, unless you are having a potluck.

And, the party throwers should have mentioned any costs upfront. This is bad. You are justified if you are sending your regrets.

Jul 04, 2015
sueatmo in Not About Food