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Good lunch in Napa Valley?

Hi all,

Thank you for all the Napa Valley lunch recommendations. We ended up going to Redd on day 1, and Bouchon on day 2.

Redd was pretty solid. I loved the relaxed, contemporary vibe of the dining room, and for the most part I thought the Asian influences were incorporated well. The lettuce cups were a bit of a disappointment--soggy and overly sweet. I loved the glazed pork belly, a gloriously rich and decadent dish, and the yellowtail tuna and hamachi tartare and petrale sole were well executed.

Although I'm not a huge fan of old-school French bistro cooking, I also enjoyed our lunch at Bouchon. The special pasta of the day, a tagliatelle with mushroom and fava bean pasta, was amazing. The green garlic soup was comforting, and the simple goat cheese salad was surprisingly tasty. The table bread was also fantastic--we needed to ask for two braided loaves.

I also wanted to call out Andie's Cafe, a diner located in a gas station that makes terrific breakfast burritos. It's obviously very humble and low key and doesn't get the press of the more renowned Yountville restaurants, but it definitely is worth a visit. The Pear, on the other hand, was not that great.

For pictures, as well as an overview of some vineyards we visited, see below:

http://bit.ly/1sYbzWS

Apr 13, 2014
gabandgobble in San Francisco Bay Area

All'Onda

awesome! i feel like Pete Wells and I are pretty much in agreement with what's good :) although he didn't like han dynasty lol

Mar 25, 2014
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Good lunch in Napa Valley?

that is a valid point - the bouchon in ny is in a shopping center, and i'm sure the experience is vastly different from the one in california. i guess i've at least tried some of bouchon's offerings so wanted to go somewhere different while in napa.

Mar 19, 2014
gabandgobble in San Francisco Bay Area

Good lunch in Napa Valley?

Thanks for the Bottega recommendation-I forgot that Michael Chiarello had a restaurant here! There's a Bouchon in new york, so I'll rule that out. Narrowing down between Bottega and Redd...

Mar 18, 2014
gabandgobble in San Francisco Bay Area

Good lunch in Napa Valley?

Hi, I'm making a trip out to Napa Valley, and I'd like recommendations for a nice weekday lunch. In terms of what I'm looking for, if French Laundry were theoretically open for lunch and had a cheaper lunch menu of about $50 a person, then I would be open to something like that. I've made reservations at Redd for now, which appears to have a $50 lunch pre-fixe, but if there are any other better options, I would love to hear about them! Thanks!

Mar 18, 2014
gabandgobble in San Francisco Bay Area

Omakase at Jewel Bako

My friends ordered the sushi omakase, so they got to try the anago. They did comment that the eel was very good. I'll keep that in mind for next time.

I agree the atmosphere is great, and if you order select sushi pieces, a dinner here is reasonable in price. However, I wouldn't say Jewel Bako's $115 chef's omakase is all that much of a bargain. Isn't Tanoshi and Sushi Dojo cheaper? I'd say $65 is reasonable, but once you break $100, then less so.

Mar 14, 2014
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Omakase at Jewel Bako

I agree that you don't award Michelin stars for omakase, you're awarded based solely on the quality of the food. I learned this from a video online of an interview with a Michelin reviewer whose identity was shrouded, wish I had a link. Maybe I wasn't clear, but other than the toro, I found the other pieces like the amberjack, yellowtail, uni or red snapper a bit lacking, so based on these assessments of the food itself, I was wondering about the Michelin star rating a bit.

Mar 14, 2014
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Omakase at Jewel Bako

I tried the sashimi omakase at Jewel Bako last weekend (note this is the omakase that comes on one platter, not the chef's tasting menu). I've heard such good things about the sushi here, and the Michelin star is certainly very impressive, but I felt like I was expecting a little more from my experience.

Obviously the quality of the fish here is high, especially the toro, but I didn't experience that melt-in-your mouth quality with each piece. The white fish like amberjack and yellowtail in particular were a bit disappointing. I was curious to see if anyone else had a similar experience here and am wondering if I need to be trying something else (select, specific pieces or rolls) to get that Michelin experience? I think I definitely prefer Ushiwakamaru to here, although the tamago at Jewel Bako is probably the best I've had. And the trio of tartares was fantastic as well.

And any recommendations on affordable, $40-$60 omakase worth going to is highly appreciated!

For more context on specific pieces, you can read below:
http://bit.ly/1fwsBkW

Mar 14, 2014
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Kansas City Food Itinerary

This post is making me miss my meals in Kansas City--I wish I had read your recommendations on Mexican food beforehand! If I had to do it over, I probably would have done some taco food crawl and checked off the chicharron taco (Bonito), chicharron gorditas (El Torito) and tacos al pastor (El Camino) off my list. As adventurous as I want to be, tripe always makes me a little queasy, and so far I haven't met one prepared at a Mexican restaurant that I've liked. But perhaps tripe tacos can change all that!

Not sure if a return trip will happen anytime soon, but Reiger and the fried fish places sound pretty enticing.

Mar 08, 2014
gabandgobble in Great Plains

Best almond croissant in EV/UnSq/Gram?

I love the almond croissant at La Colombe, on Lafayette and 4th St. Not sure where they source it from, since I don't think they make it in house, but it's my favorite.

Mar 04, 2014
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Weekend in NYC, need one cheap breakfast

I really like the breakfast sandwiches and egg plates at Taboonette in Greenwich Village/Union Square. Inexpensive, in a takeout setting.

Mar 04, 2014
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Kansas City Food Itinerary

I wonder if the duck tacos tasted differently a few years back? Makes me question Curtis Stone's palate if he thought these were the best things he ever ate!

Mar 02, 2014
gabandgobble in Great Plains

Kansas City Food Itinerary

Thanks for the feedback. I agree it's not entirely fair to judge a restaurant based on one visit, and I'm sure extra virgin won all those awards for a reason. KC does a lot of foods well, and i have confidence fancy is among them!

Feb 23, 2014
gabandgobble in Great Plains

Kansas City Food Itinerary

For my weekend trip to Kansas City, I tried searching the Chowhound discussion boards for restaurant ideas and found that most of the threads other than the BBQ ones were a bit outdated. For future reference, if anyone needs some itinerary ideas, I thought it would be helpful to report back on the restaurants I did try. As an fyi, I was pleasantly surprised by how good the food in Kansas City was, and definitely on par with some of the places in NYC.

For more context and pictures, you can read the extended version here: http://bit.ly/1h9cwFF

BBQ - Oklahoma Joe's totally lived up to the hype. The Z Man Sandwich and the ribs in particular were amazing. Totally worth the 40-minute wait in line on Sat, which is actually quite reasonable. Some people worry about the seating situation, but tables turn around fast so you'll be able to find somewhere to sit if your party is 2-4 people

Brunch - Bluestem and Room 39 do a great job of serving solid American breakfast classics. I liked the brunch at Room 39 slightly more, because the flavors were a little more interesting and memorable, but you can't go wrong at either. The artichoke toast at Room 39 was one of the more unique and tasty brunch dishes I've had in awhile. Their bloody marys and huevos rancheros are good, too.

Mexican - The tacos at Bonito Michoacan were awesome, and very budget friendly at $1.49 each! The chicharon taco was my favorite. If you're okay with eating in a Mexican grocery store and don't need the fancy margaritas/chips/guac experience, then definitely check this place out. The restaurant also has a bakery across the parking lot, which serves gigantic Mexican pastries. Leave some room for the generous wedges of cheesecake.

Coffee - I've had the best black coffee ever at Oddly Correct. This is a very hipster, serious-minded coffee shop, not unlike the places in Brooklyn or Portland. For something more laid back, you can try Mud Pie Vegan Bakery and Coffeehouse. Their black coffee isn't as good, but their milk-based drinks are tasty, as are their vegan desserts.

Cafe Sebastienne - If you're having a museum day, definitely have lunch at Cafe Sebastienne in the Kemper Museum. This isn't boring or weirdly conceptual museum food. The grilled fish tacos I had were hearty and flavorful, as were the mustard-curry shrimp.

Extra Virgin - this was the only restaurant I was disappointed by. I had high expectations for the duck tongue tacos, but there was too much shell and onion and not enough duck flavors coming through. I've had better fancy tapas elsewhere.

Feb 23, 2014
gabandgobble in Great Plains

All'Onda

I had dinner there last night. I had no idea it was one of the most highly anticipated restaurant openings in 2014! The wait on a Friday night 7:30 pm wasn't bad. For a party of two, the wait for a table was 45 minutes, and for seats at the bar, no time at all. (They only take reservations for groups of 4 or more).

The crowd tends to skew a little older. Lots of bankers and Real Housewives milling about, as well as girls' night out groups.

I really enjoyed my meal at All'onda--the fusion of Italian and Japanese flavors actually worked. Although at certain times the Italian influences overpowered the Japanese ones, and you felt like you were just eating a tasty, traditional Italian meal.

When the Italian and Japanese flavors coexisted, the combination brought an intriguing depth and complexity to the dish. This was especially true for the garganelli, a pasta dish seasoned with yuzu koshu, tarragon and peekytoe crab. If All’onda had stuck with the Italian rendition, this dish would have been extremely dense and briney. However, the Japanese aspects of citrus, spice and breadcrumbs brought balance and texture to an otherwise dark dish.

As a contrast, the bucatini pasta tasted 100% Italian. It was very characteristic of the highly refined and incredibly rich pastas that have made Ai Fiori so successful. The noodles were cooked perfectly, plump and al dente, yet yielding ever so slightly to touch. They were lightly coated in a decadent cheese sauce, which was especially splendid with the smoked uni.

We also ordered the sardines, the skate and a side of the Jerusalem artichokes. The sardines came highly recommended, and rightfully so, since they were pretty delectable. Sardines can be a bit fishy and intense, but these aspects were smoothed out by a bright and creamy fennel saffron puree, which tasted like an incredible honey mustard cream, and the golden raisins and bread crumbs further finessed the flavors.

The skate was more thought-provoking than mind-blowingly delicious. It was covered in a dense Japanese tonkatsu gravy, which imparted a meat-like quality to it. I prefer more traditional preparations of skate (think pan-fried), so I couldn’t fully embrace this one.

A surprising highlight from the night were the Jerusalem artichokes. If you’ve ever had the chance to eat some crispy duck or bacon-fat potatoes and loved the experience, then you must order them! They taste like a hybrid of potatoes, daikon and carrot. Very interesting yet tasty.

Didn't try any of the desserts, but dinner was great. The food was well-executed, inventive yet still homey. Looks like All'onda lives up to the hype! Definitely get the pastas, sardines and Jerusalem artichokes!

For more info and for pictures, you can find further description here: http://bit.ly/1iy4kyU

Jan 11, 2014
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Blue Ribbon Fried Chicken Restaurant EV

Good question I wish I could answer that

Aug 09, 2013
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Blue Ribbon Fried Chicken Restaurant EV

I actually stopped by for lunch during one of their free tasting sessions. The place reminds me of a Shake Shack for fried chicken. Very slick and spacious inside.

You can order fried chicken by the piece (breast, thigh, drumstick, wing, “mighty wing”); fried chicken dinner platters; griddled chicken burgers; sides (fries, potato wedges, cole slaw, pickled peppers, onion rings, pickled cucumbers, fried dilly beans, three bean); salads; and several options for drinks, including Mexican Coke/Sprite.

I decided to keep things simple and ordered a breast, drumstick, coleslaw, french fries and a Mexican coke. Everything was free and I technically could've ordered so much more, but I just wanted to see how good the signature chicken was.

The fried chicken here is pretty distinctive in that you can really taste the “Classic Spice” dry rub seasoning that’s on the skin. I liked how the skin was crispy without being overly dry or the other extreme of too oily. I was surprised that I actually preferred the breast to the drumstick, as the former usually tends to be a mound of unattractive, desiccated meat that lacks flavor or moisture.

You can choose to dip the fried chicken in the sauces on the table–your options include Mustard Honey, Chipotle Honey, Wild Flower Honey, BRBBQ and hot sauce. Doing so results in a marinated chicken that resembles the sweet fried chicken of the Korean Bon Chon variety. I actually thought this made the chicken taste better, especially with the Mustard Honey sauce.

In terms of sides--I thought the skinny fries here were absolutely amazing. The coleslaw was also well seasoned. It was a great, refreshing counterbalance to the heavier fried things that I was eating for lunch. The dressing was slightly sweet yet pickled and not overly thick.

Overall, I appreciated the fried chicken here but I didn't love it. It was cooked and seasoned perfectly, but I don’t think I liked how prominently I could taste the Classic Spice dry rub. I’m more of a purist and like to keep things simple with just salt and pepper. I did like customizing the chicken with the sauces, but I think the Korean chicken places are superior when it comes to the sweet marinades. I would definitely come back just for the fries. And it’s a bit expensive–my total tab came out to about $18.

Aug 09, 2013
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Bunker or Bun-ker, vietnamese in ridgewood

I wouldn't say dump--it's kitschy in that hipster tiki room sort of way. a little more character than the barebones places in ny. but there's no AC, which is unacceptable

Jul 30, 2013
gabandgobble in Outer Boroughs

Charlie Bird Review

bad service really seems to be a recurring theme at the restaurant! i'm glad my experience wasn't one-off, although it was still disappointing that it happened to me and so many others. and yeah, thinking about that server makes me so angry. there are so many good restaurants that opened with better service (estela!!), charlie bird's not going to last if they don't shape up

Jul 24, 2013
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Charlie Bird Review

I went to Charlie Bird for dinner this weekend and had a similar disappointing experience. There was a recent laughable article in Fork in the Road about how the restaurant was bringing service back to New York, but they clearly weren't talking about their own. I've experienced some of the worst service in a long awhile at Charlie Bird--rude waiter who made me feel bad about wanting to know what was in their focaccia and servers who kept trying to clear plates long before we were done. I paid $68 to eat 80% of my food and to feel bad? That doesn't make any sense.

Objectively, the roasted chicken was outstanding and the skate wing wasn't bad either. The grilled peach and prosciutto appetizer and the olive oil gelato dessert was, I agree, adequate. Just Another Chocolate Cake dessert. And that stupid focaccia was good. But I'm sorry, a good meal is more than just the food, service is so important. Charlie Bird needs to get its act together because their behavior on Sunday was borderline offensive and amateurish.

Hope other Chowhounds experience that commitment to "service' that Charlie Bird seems to talk so much about...

Jul 23, 2013
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Estela, a New Restaurant in Nolita

I actually went again on Monday. The menu changed slightly since my last visit. Ignacio is really a master at proteins and delicate seafood. The steak and beef tartare were amazing, and so was the arctic char special. Really everything was so solid--the mussels on toast, the ricotta dumplings, both desserts (panna cotta and chocolate sherbet). I think the only thing I didn't really like was the burrata. And Thomas helps you choose wine that are very accessible, interesting and reasonably priced.

From my two visits, my favorites dishes are the steak, the pork, the egg with gigante beans, the beef tartare and the raw scallops. But the ricotta dumplings and mussels aren't too far behind.

Jul 18, 2013
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Bunker or Bun-ker, vietnamese in ridgewood

i'm sure you're right about banh xeo, my knowledge of vietnamese cuisine isn't that extensive. it was almost like a freestanding taco shell, which i found challenging to eat.

heard the pho and curry chicken are supposed to be good

Jul 16, 2013
gabandgobble in Outer Boroughs

Bunker or Bun-ker, vietnamese in ridgewood

I took the L train out to the Jefferson stop. It was a quick ride, but the 10 minute walk from the subway to the restaurant wasn't very scenic.

Bunker has a kitschy, resort vibe that reminds me of small local restaurants in Hawaii and Bali. I liked the chill and casual atmosphere, but at times the restaurant was run a little too much in grassroots fashion. Water was from a self-serve cooler, the table was not set with plates and utensils, there was no A/C, a large 12-person table occupies most of the restaurant, and they ran out of several items at the peak hour of dinner service. The one grassroots aspect that I liked was the BYOB, but otherwise I felt like I was part of a coop where it wasn't my day to cook, but it was my day to set the table.

In general the food was solid and had a very homecooked quality to it. It was a tad on the greasy side. I loved the spring rolls--they were perfectly golden and crispy, and the crab and vermicelli noodle filling was solid. The side of lettuce and mint leaves, as well as the fish dipping sauce, helped cut the grease.

The shrimp and bacon egg crepe, on the other hand, I was on the fence about. I think I expected something more along the lines of a traditionally soft crepe, but the banh xeo at Bunker was more like a stiff, free-standing taco shell. I would have preferred a softer version, because it was a bit awkward breaking off rigid pieces of the crepe and trying to wrap it over the bean sprouts.

The garlic tomato fried rice was another one of my favorites. The fried rice was so flavorful and comforting, I finished this side dish before even making a dent in the lemongrass pork dish. The pork meat used in the suon nuong xa was a little too fatty and wasn't all that flavorful. I didn't think combining it with the fried egg, rice and fish sauce enhanced the dish at all.

I was pretty stuffed and also extremely hot by the end of the meal, so I didn't really feel like lingering for dessert. But I'm glad I toughed it out and had some of the refreshing and delicious coconut tapioca pudding. Cold tapioca pearls in cream is an effective remedy for beating the cruel humid heat.

If Bunker were in the neighborhood, even in Chinatown, I would definitely come back multiple times. But is it worth the destination trip? Not really. It wasn't even that cheap--the final bill came out to about $30 a person, and we didn't even order that much and we brought our own beers. The trip out to Ridgewood was an adventure, though. For more pictures and description, check out the link below:

http://bit.ly/12RD3g5

Jul 08, 2013
gabandgobble in Outer Boroughs

Estela, a New Restaurant in Nolita

My dinner at Estela, a new restaurant in Nolita run by the former chef of Isa and a former wine director at Blue Hill, was one of the best I've had in recent memory. I describe Estela as the "Don Draper" of restaurants because it's hard to pin down its culinary origins. There was a familiar, comforting aspect about the food, as if you've had this dish before in another setting, but you can't quite remember where and when. My takeaway was that Estela has no definitive roots and has instead embraced the culinary influences of the multiple cultures it has come into contact with. This absence of a definitive past shouldn't matter, because, like Don's work, the food speaks for itself!

The food is served tapas style to encourage sharing of many dishes, with sizes increasing further down the menu. We decided to order several small plates, including the raw scallops with citrus and bronze fennel, the trout with fava, yuzu, and horseradish, and the egg with gigante beans and cured tuna, as well as a larger dish of the pork with carrots, Marcona almonds, and dandelion greens.

This was one of those rare dinner moments where every single dish that came out was truly well-executed. There were no hit-or-miss inconsistencies here. The ingredients used in each dish were minimal but to the point. I did notice that there was a common thread of utilizing citrus flavors to bring some lightness to the food. This recurring yuzu and citrus theme was a good example of the hard-to-place, global flavor profile that is a byproduct of Estela's itinerant culinary lifestyle.

For instance, the raw scallops were reminiscent of the sashimi yuzu appetizers that are staples at Japanese restaurants, yet the fennel and red pepper accents threw you for a loop so that the dish couldn't completely claim Asian origins.

The trout similarly had that Asian quality with its yuzu seasoning, but the fresh and seasonal fava beans and peas seemed very American farmers' market to me. I thought the wispy ribbons of horseradish were a pretty brilliant and unique way of imparting some spice to a dish.

The egg with gigante beans and cured tuna was my favorite out of the small plates. I loved the warm and savory broth, and the combination of eggs, chunky beans and tuna was a highly satisfying and hearty one. The broth is light, more akin to a dashi soup than a thick stew, so it was perfect for the summer months.

I normally don't seek out pork at a restaurant, because I find that it usually ends up occupying two extreme ends of the spectrum--dry, tasteless pork chop loins or extremely fatty, heavy belly pieces. The pork at Estela occupies a happy medium between the two. The meat was lovely and tender and rimmed with just a touch of fattiness to provide rich, juicy flavor. The carrots and almonds provided some nutty depth and nice texture, and the slightly bitter dandelion greens kept things from being overly heavy.

Desserts can be an afterthought at many places, but that wasn't the case here. I thought the chocolate sherbet thoughtfully showcased its main ingredient in all sorts of lovely ways. You had a scoop that was decadently rich and fudge-like in nature, and another icy sherbet scoop that was a delightfully cool counter response to that. I loved the crunchiness of the hazelnuts and coffee beans and thought they provided some nice, light accents to a dish that could have been overly dense and rich.

Estela currently enjoys a somewhat anonymous existence in its unmarked address on E. Houston, but this won't last for long. It’ll be in your best interest to drop by for a walk-in during its low-key phase before favorable word-of-mouth makes it impossible to score a table. I'm hoping to sneak in another order of the pork as well as the ricotta dumplings and anchovies on my next visit, hopefully before the onslaught of diners crowd me out because they want a piece of Estela's globetrotting cuisine for themselves.

--
Sherry
www.gabandgobble.com

Jun 24, 2013
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Dinner at Lafayette

I would say the restaurant reminds me of Pastis and Balthazar. I know these are not recent French restaurants, but the whole high-end bistro atmosphere and food offerings were very similar, although Lafayette's flavors were more unique. The most recent french place I've been to is calliope, but its style of cooking isn't really traditional French cooking.

Apr 17, 2013
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Dinner at Lafayette

Andrew Carmellini's new French brasserie Lafayette finally opened for dinner service this week, and I stopped by the other day to see if it lived up to the hype. The food was good, and I appreciated Lafayette's distinctive take on classic French favorites, but overall I thought the meal was a 7+.

Why the 7+ rating? Objectively, no dish was all that delicious to me. Slightly inventive tweaks to familiar dishes didn't translate into delicious taste. We ordered the Mediterranean octopus for an appetizer, the linguine noir, the steak frites and a side of broccoli. I loved the linguine noir--the pasta was perfectly al dente and the squid-ink provided a nice brine-y flavor. The steak meat was good but overcooked and the herbs in the bernaise sauce were a little too intense. The broccoli was rather unremarkable. The diners next to us also liked the linguine and the duck, but weren't fans of the dorade.

There's also an in-house bakery that operates during the day, and we decided to order a butterscotch eclair and birthday cake macaron for dessert. Again, the flavors were interesting but not of a Lauduree or Maison Kayser caliber.

Like other Carmellini restaurants, this will be a trendy scenester spot where reservations are hard to come by. I personally think it's a bit overhyped, but the food was solid and I am intrigued enough to try some other items on the menu. There's no showstopper like the meatballs at A Voce or the ricotta at Locanda to nudge the rating to an 8 or a 9. I understand it's only the 1st week, so if other chowhounds try anything incredible I would love to know about it!

You can read a more in-depth review and see pictures in context here:
http://gabandgobble.com/?p=956

Apr 17, 2013
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Anyone tried Yuji Ramen pop up at Whole Foods?

I went to Yuji Ramen for lunch during the work week. It wasn't really crowded at that time. The ramen servings are pretty tiny, maybe I eat a lot, but I found the sizing to be more comparable to an appetizer serving. I'm sure you heard that Yuji is known for its mazemen style of ramen, which is different from the soup, broth-based ramen that we're typically accustomed to. My salmon cheese mazemen ramen tasted like a really good bowl of fettuccini.

--
Sherry
www.gabandgobble.com

Mar 27, 2013
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Hudson Clearwater

All,

Thanks once again for the recommendations. I wanted to report back on my dinner last night. The best way of describing this restaurant is to compare it to the singer Lana Del Rey--it's a lot of pretty packaging but not a whole lot of substance behind the styling! I think it's a great neighborhood spot and has good energy, but the food wasn't all that memorable. Everything was technically well executed but I wasn't blown away by any one dish.

The cocktails were good--I would recommend the Upstate Rose, Hudson Mule and King’s County. For appetizers, we ordered the butter clams and gnocchi and the pork belly special of the day. I prefer my gnocchi soft and pillowy, like the amazing buttery ones I had at Hearth. These tasted more like stale soup dumplings, which was very disappointing. The clams were great and the broth was tasty, but the dish as a whole lacked cohesion. The pork belly was pleasant enough and very solid.

For entrees, we tried the grilled hanger steak, atlantic sea bass, spice-rubbed pork chop and crispy duck breast. We also ordered the potato-cauliflower gratin and shaved brussels sprouts for sides. Again, I have to reiterate how all the dishes were well executed and technically delicious, but I didn’t find them amazing and memorable. Same thing with the desserts–the apple tarte, lemon bar and bread pudding were all good, but I’ve had much better versions elsewhere.

If you live close by in the West Village and want a good scene with decent food, Hudson Clearwater is not a bad place. But does it pass the "make the crosstown trip" test? Unfortunately, not for me.

You can read a more in-depth version here:
http://gabandgobble.com/?p=576

Mar 24, 2013
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Hudson Clearwater

Great, thanks so much! Can't go wrong with gnocchi and good cocktails.

Mar 21, 2013
gabandgobble in Manhattan

Hudson Clearwater

I'm going to Hudson Clearwater for dinner on Saturday and I was wondering if anyone could recommend any dishes that were particularly memorable? This restaurant hasn't been in many discussion threads, and in the few it has appeared the reviews were mixed. Any suggestions would be very helpful!

Mar 20, 2013
gabandgobble in Manhattan