lrohner's Profile

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Stick/Immersion blender recommendations

I have a Dualit that I don't think I could live without. I wrote an article that reviewed several of the leading brands. You can find it here: http://hubpages.com/hub/Immersion-Ble...

Be careful with some unless you're just going to use it for soup and drinks. If the blades are too high up in the shaft, it can make some jobs difficult. It also helps to have one that has variable speeds, and dishwasher safe is really, really convenient! :)

Jul 13, 2010
lrohner in Cookware

Help - Chili a little too hot

I agree with one of the poster's comments about the capsaican. The only thing that I find that does something to counteract the burn is dairy -- like drinking milk instead of water when you eat spicy foods. When my chili comes out too spicy, I just stir in some shredded cheddar and/or Monterey Jack right before serving and it does help some.

Sep 20, 2009
lrohner in Home Cooking

Pumpkin recipes anyone?

Carvel ice cream shoppes used to carry a soft-serve pumpkin pie ice cream around the holidays that was to die for! There are a bunch of recipes on the net for the regular stuff, but if anyone can figure out the soft-serve, let me know!

http://homecooking.about.com/od/desse...
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/pu...
http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,1937,...

Sep 14, 2009
lrohner in Home Cooking

Colombian-style arepas

P.A.N. is just a specific brand of Masa Harina and the top-selling brand in South America I believe. You can find different brands of masa harina right in your grocery store in the flour/sugar aisle. Or you can purchase P.A.N. online here: http://www.amigofoods.com/harinapan34...

Sep 14, 2009
lrohner in Home Cooking

Chic hors d'oeuvres

I second the oysters. They're decadent, delicious and best of all, easy. Take some sea salt or kosher salt and pour lots of it on the serving platters to make a bed for the oysters. Keep the ice in the prep room. Too easy to spill and make a slippery floor for the guests.

For cheese, make parmesan cones (just dump some shredded parmesan on a skillet, let it melt, and then quickly roll it into a cone shape. You'll have to figure out some type of holder for them -- perhaps some cool looking foam with holes carved into it. Serve some gourmet lobster mac and cheese in them. You can cook ahead of time and just slightly warm it before serving either in a microwave or under a heat lamp. Room temp is fine as long as you have a good, creamy mac and cheese recipe. I use Gouda, Cheddar, creamed cheese and evaporated milk (among other things) and that seems to do the trick.

I would also do a nice gazpacho served in shooter glasses. Mini burgers made with tuna or beef tartare might be good too. I just use my own hamburger bun recipe and make them smaller -- somewhere between a quarter and a silver dollar sized.

Aug 12, 2009
lrohner in Home Cooking

Your mom's weird cooking ... and other stories? (recipes encouraged)

Good Lord, my mother (God rest her soul) was THE worst cook in the world! Unfortunately she preferred all meats, poultry and seafood to be blackened -- and I don't mean with spices. I mean charred. And she loved her cast iron skillet, and would use it religiously to cook leftovers (pre-microwave days). Let's say there was leftover pork chops, mashed potatoes and peas in the fridge. She would put them altogether in the skillet (not mixed together), pour in some water, cover it and walk away. So it wasn't bad enough that we had to eat charred food. Now we had to eat soggy charred food!

My sister and I went to a Catholic elementary school and they didn't have a cafeteria so we had to bring lunch every day. My mother actually bought a book of "365 Sandwiches" and decided to make them all for us. Imagine my surprise thinking I was getting ready to bit into a peanut butter sandwich and it turned out to be a "Mashed Baked Bean Sandwich". BLECH! I also remember the April Fool's Day where she packed us fake cheese sandwiches made out of foam. Funny Mom. But she forgot to send us a real lunch!

But probably the strangest was her love of tomato juice. For holidays or when we had company over, we always had a first course (served quite elegantly) of shooters of tomato juice. Huh?

Aug 12, 2009
lrohner in Home Cooking

cookbooks: hidden gems?

I just adore "Lidia's Italy" by Lidia Bastianich. She explores her ten favorite areas in Italy through their foods, but also talks about the places themselves.

Aug 12, 2009
lrohner in Home Cooking

ISO World's Best Mac 'n' Cheese

A few months ago, I was in charge of catering for my daughter's baby shower. Obviously the menu was all around foods that she loves, including macaroni and cheese. I love my great-grandmother's recipe, but I didn't think it was creamy enough to serve to guests. I found the PERFECT recipe, made it and then lost it. I forgot to bookmark the darn thing! It used Gouda, cream cheese and Cheddar. As I was researching, I discovered a few things I never knew:

1. Do not ever, ever use the pre-shredded cheese that you buy in bags at the grocery store. The cheese shreds are coated with cornstarch so they don't stick together, and all of that cornstarch makes the cheese sauce pretty darn chunky!

2. To keep the sauce creamy, use evaporated milk (or 1/2 whole milk, 1/2 evaporated). The perfect recipe that I can't find now (drat!) used 1/2 evaporated.

And I always use a good bit of Coleman's dried mustard. It really brings out the cheese flavor.

Aug 12, 2009
lrohner in Home Cooking

the Best Canned Tuna?

I agree. For my day-to-day tuna needs, it's Genova or nothing.

Aug 12, 2009
lrohner in General Topics

Regional favorite that you just didn't get once you finally had a chance to try it

When I first moved to Miami, I was dying to taste authentic Cuban cuisine. Boy, I just didn't get it. Especially when I saw Cuban Sandwiches and Dulce de Leche shakes on MacD's menu!

But I did absolutely fall in love with Venezuelan food and the Brazilian churrascarias they had there.

Aug 12, 2009
lrohner in General Topics

nutella recipes?

I wrote an article a while ago with several different ideas/recipes for using Nutella.

http://hubpages.com/hub/nutella-recipes

Enjoy!

Aug 08, 2009
lrohner in Home Cooking

Ethnic cookies?

Thank! Do you have any of the recipes that we can post?

Oct 10, 2007
lrohner in Home Cooking

Ethnic cookies?

Any countries where I didn't find anything? HAR!!! Let's start with the A's: I'm stuck on Andorra, Angola and Antigua/Barbuda, For the B's, I'm stuck on Bahamas, Bharain, Barbados, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bermuda, Botswana, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burma and Burundi. I won't even START on the C's! This is REALLY a challenge cuz when I say "every country", I mean "every country"!

I've recently enlisted the aid of a librarian at the New York Public Library who is into baking. The problem she's finding is that most of the cookbooks from these smaller countries (if they even exist) are not in English. Sheeeeesh!

As for the Bazareh, yes -- it does taste like a butter or sugar cookie. The mahleb should make a distinct difference. It's a spice that comes from black cherries (yum yum) which should give the cookie a very unique flavor. Many countries use cardamom in what otherwise would be sugar cookies, etc.

I've learned a few things from this whole endeavor not the least of which is that most countries have at least one version of a simple butter or sugar cookie. Another big learning is that what one country might consider a very traditional cookie is really just a cookie from another country with one or two ingredients changed (or the cooking method) to more local fare, as is the case with the Bazareh. Kifli from Hungary is another good example. It's really a spin-off of the Jewish Rugelach (or vice versa -- I'm not sure).

Like right now I'm going nuts with Languos de Gato (Cat's Tongue). Spain claims it as its own, but it really has its origins in French ladyfingers. And BTW, the Phillipines claim "Langue de Gato" cookies as their own. Shoot! My head is spinning!

And then there's Kue Semprong from Indonesia which is almost the same as (I can't remember the name) from Malaysia which is almost the same as Gaufrettes from France which is almost the same as Pizzelles from Italy.

Anyhoo, I think I've undertaken a huge task here. I would love to have a blog partner who's as interested in this as I am. Will give full credits and am willing to split (what little) AdSense $$$ pop up. It's in the pennies right now but am more than happy to split it since I'm not really in it for the money.

If you're interested, email me at globalcookies@gmail.com. If you're not, let's keep in touch through this thread and my blog!

Oct 05, 2007
lrohner in Home Cooking

Ethnic cookies?

OMG I cannot believe I just found this thread! Since I'm a cookie freak at the holidays and always try to have an international variety on my cookie trays, a few months ago I started a blog called "A Cookie for Every Country" where I am attempting (and I say that with trepidation) to document at least one cookie for every country. I've got about 30 posted and a bunch more just waiting for me to write them up. Please visit at http://globalcookies.blogspot.com. And please let me know if you have suggestions, information, or recipes. I will be happy to link it to your blog or website and will give you full credit for the recipe.

I've got many of the cookies you guys have already mentioned posted as well as Khatai cookies from Afghanistan, Anzac biscuits from Australia, Nanaimo bars from Canada (can you tell I was trying to go alphabetically?), Daktyla from Cyprus, Suussulavad Kaerakupsised from Estonia, and many, many more.

But again, I'm really looking for suggestions! You can also email me at globalcookies@gmail.com.

Oct 05, 2007
lrohner in Home Cooking