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citrus stand in Stewart or West Palm area?

Cushman's is touting their "western" (Texas or California) honeybells -- yikes! Not what I had in mind.

Feb 07, 2013
swimmom in Florida

citrus stand in Stewart or West Palm area?

Yes, Stuart with a "u". I will locate these on the map. I have had good fruit from Hale in the past. Thanks.

Any other suggestions would be welcomed.

Feb 07, 2013
swimmom in Florida

citrus stand in Stewart or West Palm area?

Can anybody recommend an excellent quality citrus grove with retail stand in the Stewart vicinity, or anywhere between Stewart and the West Palm airport?

Feb 07, 2013
swimmom in Florida

Maui (Lahaina / Hana) & Big Island (Kona / Volcano Village) recs sought

Ken's House of Pancakes in Hilo is a place that we remember fondly. But just know going in that it's a popular local diner; no more, no less. Loco moco, saimin, portuguese sausage, etc. We have eaten there both morning and evening. Once in the evening, they shunted us over to a separate room that had nothing but tourists in it. So much for the local atmosphere.

Jul 04, 2012
swimmom in Hawaii

Maui (Lahaina / Hana) & Big Island (Kona / Volcano Village) recs sought

The poke is great at the fish counter of the supermarket in Waikoloa Village (up the hill from Waikoloa Beach). There is only one possible supermarket, you can't miss it. I make a beeline there for the poke and a tub of Hanalei poi, asap, upon landing. It's not a restaurant, but you sound like you might enjoy it, anyway.
I agree about Yee's mangoes and the Kihei Caffe on Maui. Eskimo Candy is a fish market in Kihei with equally good poke.

Jul 04, 2012
swimmom in Hawaii

Getting married in Upcountry Kula on Maui and I need a killer place for the rehersal dinner!

I wonder if the Kafsacks who own and run Suffing Goat Dairy in Olowalu would cater for you. They do occasional dinners for special events, the place has a ton of character, and they seem to have high standards for everything they do.

Jun 12, 2012
swimmom in Hawaii

Worst meal in years (locals schmocals)

At the risk of I-don't-know-what on this very interesting thread -- where would you eat on a budget with perpetually ravenous teens? We will be going to Rome for the museums and history, not for fine dining, and sleeping in Parioli (so that neighborhood is a dinner option; not a lunch option). Our kids would not be seeing the museums and the history if the fine dining were a mandatory part of the budget. The target price is 10 to 15 Euro per person without wine. We are receptive to all options, including supermarkets and street food (but hoping to avoid Subway and McDonald's while in Rome, of course). I just had a fabulous piece of supermarket quiche in Paris. We are flexible. The one thing we are not flexible about is that the football player in the group needs large, frequent amounts of food.

May 02, 2012
swimmom in Italy

mapping out the Paris oysters

This is wonderful information. I have a stomach bug today, so actually it all sounds horrible, but I hope to be back in Houndville very soon.

Mar 16, 2012
swimmom in France

Paris Le Dome, Rotonde Montparnasse, etc?

Good to know. Thanks. Any other recommendations along these lines, anything I've overlooked, would be helpful. No particular arrondisement -- we like to explore.

Mar 08, 2012
swimmom in France

Paris Le Dome, Rotonde Montparnasse, etc?

Would "Le Dome" and "Cafe de la Rotonde Montparnasse" both be OK for oysters? Are they really at the same intersection, Boulevard de Montparnasse and Boulevard de Raspail? We have one member of the party with lots of food allergies, and one member who basically won't eat anything but beef (i'm exaggerating a little). So with reluctance, I am leaning away from Rino (uncontrollable ingredients) and Pleine Mer (really just seafood).

Any comments on how Le Comptoir des Mers might compare with the Montparnasse/Raspail duo, and how it might work for this party? Or other suggestions?

The sky is not the limit -- family of four with college tuition looming -- the restaurants I mentioned seem to be within our price range, but I'm not looking to spend more. Thanks.

Mar 08, 2012
swimmom in France

mapping out the Paris oysters

Would "Le Dome" and "Cafe de la Rotonde Montparnasse" both be OK for oysters? Are they really at the same intersection, Boulevard de Montparnasse and Boulevard de Raspail? We have one member of the party with lots of food allergies, and one member who basically won't eat anything but beef (i'm exaggerating a little). So with reluctance, I am leaning away from Rino (uncontrollable ingredients) and Pleine Mer (really just seafood).

Any comments on how Le Comptoir des Mers might compare with the Montparnasse/Raspail duo, and how it might work for this party? Or other suggestions?

The sky is not the limit -- family of four with college tuition looming -- the restaurants I mentioned seem to be within our price range, but I'm not looking to spend more. Thanks.

Mar 07, 2012
swimmom in France

still not sure about the best type of turkey

It is a little Kafkaesque, isn't it? I have had some good birds her way, but when I was a kid in the 60s in an agricultural area of South Jersey, where much poultry was raised at the time, I remember my mom and other ladies in town roasting turkeys at home for an annual fundraising dinner. They were succulent. Somebody would drive around in a big (probably seatbelt-free) American station wagon and pick up the turkeys at the houses, on a schedule, and take them to the dinner for carving and serving. They roasted them slowly, and they were always tented with a brown grocery bag in the oven. The bag was cut open to make a big flat piece of paper, and the paper was greased or buttered. I should ask my mom about this. She switched over to a more "Kafkaesque" method years ago, maybe out of expediency. I had just assumed that they must have had better birds back then and there, but maybe it's the method, too. Then there were the two ladies who stood all day, making all the gravy for hundreds of dinners. I should ask my mom about their technique.

Nov 28, 2011
swimmom in General Topics

Christmas dinner in Kohala, Waimea/Kamuela, or down in Kona

By way of belated update, we realized that you were making sense -- the little local hole-in-the-wall places we like would not be open on Christmas. So we had dinner at the buffet at the Hapuna Prince, which was convenient for us and hit a somewhat better (lower) price point than a lot of its peers. It was fabulous, as to the food, setting, and staff. And I am no big fan of buffets. We loved it, and would go back.

Nov 27, 2011
swimmom in Hawaii

still not sure about the best type of turkey

The Twinkies caught my eye days ago, and I now shudder when I pass the Hostess display in the supermarket.

Nov 27, 2011
swimmom in General Topics

At what age should you let a child handle a kitchen knife to help with food prep? [moved from Home Cooking]]

I was cleaning and fileting fish at age 8 and cooking whole meals by 12, so I would have been fine cutting vegetables at 11, and so would my kids. But there is no magic age. It's the parent's role to teach at home, when other things and people are not competing for the pair's attention as they work together. It is not the aunt's obligation to teach when it wasn't her idea to teach. I think the OP handled the situation well. And it's sort of insincere of guests to offer to help and then refuse to help where most needed -- if the hostess wants you to set the table, do that. I have also found that some skills my kids do have, they need not display in someone else's home if the other person is not comfortable with that. My son was adept at tree climbing, and I didn't bat an eye, but he would not do it at someone else's house if it made them nervous or distracted. Good manners calls for us to not annoy our hosts.

Nov 27, 2011
swimmom in Not About Food

still not sure about the best type of turkey

I'm getting inspired to have turkey instead of ham this Christmas -- frozen, couch-potato kind, using my mom's extra refrigerator capacity to defrost it, if necessary. sedimental, can you tell me how your "low and slow" method worked? There have been threads on this, debates, variations, and I would be really grateful to have someone who had a positive experience just cut through all that and tell me what they did. As for defrosting -- will I need to leave it in the back of the fridge for a week?

Nov 27, 2011
swimmom in General Topics

still not sure about the best type of turkey

two questions: was the Butterball frozen and the Heritage fresh? Did your method of preparation vary from your neighbor's? (I agree that preparation must matter, but I use the same method each time, and yet sometimes there's just no flavor, so there must be more than one variable.) I have always assumed that anything cheap, frozen and heavily advertised must be inferior, but as I sat at the table, I began to question all that! And it's true with vegetables, sometimes the thing frozen on the day it was picked is better than the thing that has sat in a refrigerator and ridden on a truck for 7-10 days.

Nov 27, 2011
swimmom in General Topics

still not sure about the best type of turkey

I'm starting to wonder if the problem is that it is "fresh" -- a turkey sold in a supermarket from a large purveyor like Bell and Evan's can't be all that fresh at a high-demand time like Thanksgiving. Maybe it's been sitting too long. I do cook turkey at other times of the year, simply because we like it, and maybe this is why I seem to get a tastier bird at low-demand times. If I do solve my refrigerator capacity problem, I think my next bird will be a frozen Kosher, and we'll see how that goes.

Nov 27, 2011
swimmom in General Topics

My DH won't buy a Trader Joe's fresh turkey. Please discuss!

If you have a husband who prepares a very, very good turkey, a lot of women would thank their lucky stars and let him do it his way!

Nov 27, 2011
swimmom in General Topics

still not sure about the best type of turkey

When I get a disappointing turkey, its a lack of flavor, and a tough, stringy texture. I think to some extent its the luck of the draw on the individual unit. Like cantaloupes from the same bin. But I do benefit from the findings of others.

Nov 27, 2011
swimmom in General Topics

still not sure about the best type of turkey

About thawying the frozen bird -- I may be expanding my refrigerator capacity in the future -- is there any reason to believe that a frozen bird will taste better? Is that how the Butterballs are sold?

Nov 27, 2011
swimmom in General Topics

still not sure about the best type of turkey

Advice invited -- I was disappointed once again by my Bell and Evans fresh turkey. I think I know what I'm doing as far as cooking technique goes, generally following Barbara Kafka's advice, and I always do the same thing and sometimes get great results, so I think the variable is the bird itself. (And I seem to get better birds at other times of the year.) Here are my parameters. I don't have refrigerator capacity to thaw a frozen bird and do not want to thaw one in pots of water; I want a fresh bird. I do not want to get involved in brining, or cooking the turkey outside (although I do have a electric rotisserie for my gas Weber and might try that in reliably good weather -- but not as a plan for November, December holidays in the Northeast). I am not too concerned with price, and would be willing to go to a Kosher butcher if there were valid culinary reasons, but it will add a one hour additional errand to my shopping and it can't be done on Saturday, so it's not always feasible. At the other end of the spectrum, I would even consider a commercial turkey, such as a Butterball, although I've always turned my nose up at them. I realized at the dinner table that I've never actually tried one, and maybe I should. I would also consider Costco, which I love for paper towels but I've never tried their turkey. I just want a reasonably tender bird that tastes like turkey, without days in the fridge or brining. (I am reminded, as I open the Pandora's box of turkey preferences, that the Hawaiian state legislature allowed the humuhumunukunuku's status as "state fish" to expire because they didn't want to revisit such a partisan issue.)

Nov 27, 2011
swimmom in General Topics

Can you make a pot roast with boneless chuck steak?

They make great pot roast, maybe not so great from the cardiologist's point of view, but because pot roasting is really more like braising than true dry roasting, it works with chuck of any thickness. The thickness influences the cooking time but should not be a problem with the final product, flavor-wise or texture-wise.

Nov 27, 2011
swimmom in Home Cooking

September 2011 Trip Report OR How not to eat in Paris the Chowhound Way

Thank you for this. This is actually great for a family with teens where at least two of the group are foodies at heart, but spontaneity of itinerary rules the day and tuition takes priority over high-end restaurants.

Oct 11, 2011
swimmom in France

good tasting fridge-filtered water?

Any feedback on how the filtered water from your fridge tastes, and which brand of fridge it is? We have enjoyed very good water from our Kitchen Aid, which uses a PUR filter. We have other reasons we are looking to replace the fridge, but we have been essentially freed of bottled water for the past six years by this filter, and do not want to move backward in that regard. All input appreciated.

Oct 10, 2011
swimmom in Cookware

a brand of fridge that doesn't freeze the lettuce?

Thanks for this input, which helps. I was out looking today and will be posting a followup question -- which fridge brands have good-tasting water filters?

Oct 10, 2011
swimmom in Cookware

a brand of fridge that doesn't freeze the lettuce?

When our current fridge is kept cold enough for food safety, any produce that gets pushed to the back, freezes. (And trying to train the people in this house to keep pulling that stuff back to the front after they've gotten what they want is a lost cause.) I need a brand recommendation for something with better control over interior air and temp distribution, or maybe bins where you can vary and control the temp a bit. The lettuce probably does not need to be kept as cold as the raw fish. I probably need at least five bins, and would like to be able to dial back the temp on at least one or two. I'm looking to keep the price no more than about $2200 and I'm willing to wait for a good sale. Other details, for whatever it's worth -- I'll be looking for a side-by-side, stainless, filtered water and ice through the door, regular depth (not counter depth). Bosch seems to offer some bin-temp control in a counter-depth model, and I will consider it if I must, but I am reluctant to sacrifice fridge capacity by going with counter-depth, and the kitchen itself accommodates the traditional depth without seeming cramped.

Oct 09, 2011
swimmom in Cookware

first-date, gender etiquette question

It seems to me that it's like a situation where if the two of you came to a door, and you paused instead of reaching for the handle, he would probably assume that you were pausing to give him time and space to be chivalrous and open it for you. The old custom of a man placing a woman's order (not "ordering for you" in the sense of picking out what you would eat) is something that modern women might not expect, or might even chafe against. But if each party were to place their own order, most well-mannered men would presume to let the lady go first, and when confronted with a pause, he would have no way of knowing that you have a little personal habit of never ordering first. His behavior sounds polite, not paternalistic in the way it might be for someone to presume to select your food. But then again, Jerry Seinfeld and Elaine Benes have surely dumped people for less!

Aug 18, 2011
swimmom in Not About Food

Bavarian cuisine: What is it and where can I read up on it?

The Doner Kebap or Doner Kebab is a sandwich, sort of like a gyro or souvlaki in the US, but my kids say it's better. It's offered in small shops that were started principally by Turkish guest workers in Germany. It has become part of German cuisine the way pizza has become part of NY cuisine. Wurstl stands are also popular for a quick imbiss (snack). Currywurst is basically hot dogs with a curry-infused ketchup. Another popular snack is leberkaese, which translates to liver cheese, but it's neither liver nor cheese; people call it a meatloaf but it's more like a cold cut that what an American might think of as meatloaf.

May 11, 2011
swimmom in Europe

Bavarian cuisine: What is it and where can I read up on it?

I misspelled Dallmayr in my recent post. I also overlooked Alfons Schuhbeck, who is a high-end Munich celebrity chef. I have not eaten in his restaurant, but I have his cookbook. He is near the Hofbrauhaus, across from Starbucks, and has a small, separate ice cream shop right next to his restaurant. Weisswurst (white meat sausage) is a Munich specialty, served only until noon. They should be served in hot water, in a thing like a fondue pot, with a heat source underneath. You hold it in your hand, make an incision along the length, slip the skin off, and eat it with sweet mustard. If you like the mustard, and you plan to check your baggage, get some as a souvenir at Dallmayr. You might also find that their "mittelscharf" (medium sharp) mustard is more useful for sandwiches when you return home. If your experiences with sauerkraut have taken place in the U.S., try theirs with an open mind.

May 11, 2011
swimmom in Europe