druz99's Profile

Title Last Reply

Michelin 3 stars

Hey everyone, just wanted to bring to your attention a new review I did on Hamadaya in Tokyo. A magnificent experience, with 3-stars well deserved.

Here's the link if you're interested (pictures and video included): http://www.hungrydru.com/2008/12/25/g...

Located in the bustling old-town Tokyo region of Akasaka, Hamadaya is certainly a hidden sanctuary tucked away in an obscure side street. Earnestly awaiting your arrival, you are greeted by 2 kneeling waitresses–one of whom we later learn is Mari, one of the owner’s daughters. With smiling faces and a warm “iraishaimase,” it’s from this point onwards that you know you are in for royal treatment. I mean, when was the last time you were greeted by 2 kneeling women?

What I particularly enjoyed about the experience apart from the food is that unlike most other 3-Michelin-Star establishments, the Hamadaya experience was surprisingly laid back. Perhaps it’s the fact that parties are seated in individual private rooms, so you feel less of a need to be on your best behavior. Or maybe it’s because you’re sitting on the floor in your socks. But it’s probably the warm, wooden, traditional homey interior of the place (there was even an old-school Sony television in the waiting room, as if part of someone’s living room…and listen out for the creeky floors in the video at the end of this post). Whatever it was, it was a pleasure and a refreshing change from the “fine-dining” mold.

Two lunch menus are offered, one at 15,000JPY per person and another at 23,000JPY per person. Below outlines the 15,000JPY lunch menu, though it must be noted that according to Mari, the menu changes every two weeks.

As our amuse, we were treated to vegetables dressed with sesame paste, mashed broad beans, deep fried prawn, and grilled squid. All of which were geometrically beautiful. I especially enjoyed the vegetables in sesame paste–small bites yet packed with serious nutty and fragrant punch reminiscent of “gado-gado,” an Indonesian take on salad.

Next, was the clear soup dish: a dumpling of adductor in a round clam, bamboo shoot, carrot, beancurd skin, and daikon raddish–an amazing balance of flavors and textures from the crisp sweetness of the bamboo shoot to the tender, warm, savoriness of the dumpling. All topped off with the refreshing scent of orange peel permeating the dish.

Sashimi of otoro, flat fish, and striped jack was next. As expected, the trio was beautifully presented, choice of fish thoughtfully selected, and quality nothing short of spectacular. The flat fish, typically a refreshing and clean choice of sashimi, certainly carried those characteristics but unlike any I’ve tried before, had a subtle sweetness. I was compelled to douse extra soy sauce on it just to bring out the sweetness. The striped jack had a more firm texture which kept things interesting. The otoro…well, it’s hard to go wrong when this probably came from Tsujiki market at 5am the very same morning.

The fourth dish was steamed rice topped with 3 slices of wagyu. No bottled terriyaki sauce, just a simple seasoning of salt, pepper, soy sauce, and quality cuts of meat. All beautifully presented, and served in just the right amount to make you want more (which is the perfect portion size, of course).

The grilled plate was a grilled yellowtail dressed with Japanese pepper and picked herring roe. Personally, my least favorite dish since I felt the grilling may have dried the fish out a little, but a wonderful combination of flavors and textures–especially the herring roe, which is gelatenous and covered in a sticky film.

Next was a simmered plate of daikon radish covered in deep fried tofu skin, a duck meatball, and greens. Again, quality ingredients with minimal human-intervention allowing the freshness and raw flavors of the ingredients to shine. The duck meatball was so delicate and soft, I could eat those all day.

As the last course, we had rice cooked with bamboo shoots, omelette with crab, and dark brown miso soup with pickles. Simply fantastic.

For dessert, the freshest Japanese fruit you can imagine, simply yet beautifully presented. Paired with a red bean mochi, which while very sweet, was extremely fragrant.

Eight rooms, eight chefs. They might not be the “celebrity chefs” who so many of us, myself included, put up on a pedastel, but they are most definitely unsung heros delivering gastronomic pleasure to everyone who walks in the doors at Hamadaya.

Thank you Mari and the Hamadaya staff who made this one of the most enjoyable meals I’ve had the pleasure of experiencing in a very long time. And Merry Christmas to one and all!

Dec 25, 2008
druz99 in Japan

absolutely delicious take-out snacks/treats around Manhattan?

I came across this awesome artcile on SE called "NYC's Top 10 Ice Cream Sandwiches." Don't think you can get a better treat than that! Enjoy:

http://www.seriouseats.com/newyork/20...

Jun 25, 2008
druz99 in Manhattan

What do you like at Spotted Pig

Thoughts on Spotted Pig:

Alas, after two previously failed attempts at dining at the Pig ("the wait will be 2 hours"--a polite way of saying "f**k off," basically), it was a case of the third time's a charm for us as we were told the wait would just be 15-20 minutes. Music to my ears as you can imagine, especially since we arrived at 12:00pm on a Saturday, peak brunch hour.

A thumbs up from The Man himself plus three consecutive Michelin stars awarded to Spotted Pig equals major hype. And major hype equals a recipe for major disappointment. So when I opted for the burger with shoestring fries, I tried my best to not buy into the hype and instead eat and enjoy the burger for what it was.

The shoestring fries were good, freshly fried and thoughtfully garnished with thin slices of fried garlic and fresh rosemary. But I soon realized that I am not a fan of the shoe-string (all skin, too much crunch), and more a fan of the wedge (plump, and filled with potato). I guess an accurate analogy would be a stick-skinny model (Kate Moss) versus a healthier woman (say, Julianne Hough). What is your preference? But I guess if you were a fan of the shoe-string, these would have to be a perfect 10.

The burger itself had all the elements of a great burger. Buns were bronzed (toasty on the outside and fluffy within) and the meat was smoky yet extremely juicy. If only they hadn't smothered it in blue cheese! A case of personal preference, perhaps, but my companion who also got the burger concurred that the blue cheese completely overwhlemed the burger. When you take a bite, the textures are nice...but flavors almost completely blue cheese. (I now have a cold sore from the sodium content).

Having said this, I love everything else about Spotted Pig. From the cute branding centered around the pig, to the very warm and inviting "neighborhood bar" feeling of the actual space. I'll be back, more than willing to fight off the "mosh-pit" crowds, and more than eager to get wowed by the other items on the menu.

Pictures: http://dru.gobbl.com

Feb 09, 2008
druz99 in Manhattan

Report from the Battle Field: Spotted Pig

Alas, after two previously failed attempts at dining at the Pig ("the wait will be 2 hours"--a polite way of saying "f**k off," basically), it was a case of the third time's a charm for us as we were told the wait would just be 15-20 minutes. Music to my ears as you can imagine, especially since we arrived at 12:00pm on a Saturday, peak brunch hour.

A thumbs up from The Man (Bruni) himself plus three consecutive Michelin stars awarded to Spotted Pig equals major hype. And major hype equals a recipe for major disappointment. So when I opted for the burger with shoestring fries, I tried my best to not buy into the hype and instead eat and enjoy the burger for what it was.

The shoestring fries were good, freshly fried and thoughtfully garnished with thin slices of fried garlic and rosemary. But I soon realized that I am not a fan of the shoe-string (all skin, too much crunch), and more a fan of the wedge (plump, and filled with potato). I guess an accurate analogy would be a stick-skinny model (Kate Moss) versus a healthier woman (say, Julianne Hough). What is your preference? But I guess if you were a fan of the shoe-string, these would have to be a perfect 10.

The burger itself had all the elements of a great burger. Buns were bronzed (toasty on the outside and fluffy within) and the meat was smoky yet extremely juicy. If only they hadn't smothered it in blue cheese! A case of personal preference, perhaps, but my companion who also got the burger concurred that the blue cheese completely overwhlemed the burger. When you take a bite, the textures are nice...but flavors almost completely blue cheese. (I now have a cold sore from the sodium content).

Having said this, I love everything else about Spotted Pig. From the cute branding centered around the pig, to the very warm and inviting "neighborhood bar" feeling of the actual space. I'll be back, more than willing to fight off the "mosh-pit" crowds, and more than eager to get wowed by the other items on the menu.

Pictures, and more: http://www.gobbl.com/blog/615

Nov 17, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Yakitori...Vote Here

Where's your favorite Yakitori place in town?

My review of Oh! Taisho:

Contrary to what Yaeri S. suggests in her entry on Tori Shin, another yakitori spot, do come to Oh! Taisho with a huge appetite. If you arrive without one, that's alright, because it's likely that by the time you make your way through the exorbitant crowds that spill out of the narrow space, you'd have built a healthy appetite. Once you do, go nuts.

Granted, the overall quality of the food is just so-so, but I love reveling like a kid in a candy store at the huge array of tasty small plates (many of which are fried and accompanied by mayonnaise--score!). It's fun to just lose your self-control and pick up anywhere from 5, 6...heck, 10 items because they look so darn good on the menu!

This evening we ordered an array of yakitori including chicken liver, chicken meat balls, chicken skin, garlic, and the prawns. Do order the chicken skin (requested to be prepared "extra crispy," an idea I got from Top Chef winner Ilan when I overheard him order his this way), but skip the prawns since it was a pain to have to peel and spit out bits of shell. Plus it just doesn't look very sexy.

Next, came the fried fish cake with cheese and fried octopus balls--both of which were doughy and definitely looked better than they tasted. The kimchee yaki-udon was pretty good, though.

For an unpretentious and rowdy time, Taisho is always a good option. Just make sure you allot ample time for a potential hour-long wait and try to leave high expectations at the door. For the most part, items here look better than they taste...but for what you pay (a modest $20+/person, large bottles of Asahi, included), it's a fair deal.

For rating and pictures: http://www.gobbl.com/blog/614

Nov 16, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Daniel, Danube, Bouley. Pick One.

Hopefully these links will help you make a informed decisions. Both feature pictures of what you'll be getting on the tasting menu!

My experience on Bouley: http://www.gobbl.com/blog/417
An experience on Daniel: http://www.gobbl.com/blog/608

I have yet to try Daniel, but it seems Bouley will deliver more value for money as I think it's under half the price. I may be wrong...hounders feel free to correct me on this one!

Nov 15, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Menupages censoring negative reviews of sponsors?

It doesn't surprise me if that's part of the "deal" that they make with sponsor restaurants. Having said this, I know first-hand that sites like Yelp and Gobbl (which I use) are censor free...what you see is the true word on the street!

-----------------------------
Dru's NYC Eats
http://dru.gobbl.com

Nov 15, 2007
druz99 in Food Media & News

Michelin Stars Out!!!

I was perusing the Red Book and was shocked to see Vong as a 1-star recipient. I had a 50 person birthday party here, and I found the food sub-par. Just because it's run by Jean Georges doesn't automatically make it Michelin calibre, people....

----------------------------
Dru's NYC Eats
http://dru.gobbl.com

Nov 15, 2007
druz99 in Food Media & News

Lunch at Jean Georges

Even though it excludes dessert, it's still a fantastic deal. I find lunch at Nougatine (especially when it's sunny outside) much better than the stuffy dinner in the formal dining room, where the food is good...but not great. It's better than Perry St, for sure!

-------------------------------
Dru's NYC Eats
http://dru.gobbl.com

Nov 15, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

A very difficult challenge / request for the hounds

Coming from a Columbia alum: Max Soha on Amsterdam, or Dinosaur BBQ in the heart of harlem.

-------------------------------
Dru's NYC Eats
http://dru.gobbl.com

Nov 15, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Dinner in W. Village near Arthur's Tavern

August, Piccolo Angolo, Mas, Paris Commune--all those seem to fit your criteria! Good luck!

-------------------------------
Dru's NYC Eats
http://dru.gobbl.com

Nov 15, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

manhatten clam chowder

Can't go wrong with a nice hot bowl from Pearl Oyster Bar....

------------------------------
Dru's NYC Eats
http://dru.gobbl.com

Nov 15, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

birthday dinner for bf on a budget

Tia Pol: http://dru.gobbl.com

Good food, drink, affordable, you can dress up without having to act snooty!

Nov 08, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Tia Pol Review

Reservations taken only for parties > 6

Nov 08, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Tia Pol Review

As soon as you set foot inside Tia Pol, you know you're in for a good time. For a Wednesday evening, the place was absolutely buzzing with people presumably kicking back from a hard days work and happy that the weekend was now in sight.

Naturally, there was a wait for our party of 2, but grudges were quickly squandered as soon as our poison of choice for the evening, a nice big jug of sangria, arrived. Plus we were able to place an order of pratatas bravas (rough cut fried potatoes with spicy aioli) which made the wait all the more bearable. When you're hungry, nothing tastes better than, essentially, french fries with mayonnaise and paprika--it was delicious.

30 minutes later, we were seated at the bar (which was fine, and probably more fun than sitting at a table) and the ordering began. We selected an assortment of tapas including razor clams, lamb skewers, squid in ink with rice, chorizo with bittersweet chocolate, ham croquettes, and an order of the suckling pig.

While all the dishes were consistently excellent across the board, there was one run-away winner: the suckling pig. I will probably encounter death a few days sooner as I am pretty sure my arteries are now irreversably more congested, but my was it worth it! The skin was absolute perfection...honey glazed yet still cripsy, with all the fatty goodness that makes tasty food tasty. A sure way to satisfy any savory cravings!

To finish, we shared an order of the almond cake, which I loved. Especially since I enjoy other almond desserts like almond tofu and almost bubble tea. The cake burst with that lovely almond scent and paired with the ice cream and a slightly salty caramel sauce, was pretty darn bomb (for lack of a better word).

I am not sure whether sitting at the bar subconciously drove us to consume the amount of booze we did, because not only were we completely stuffed, but we were pretty toasted too! It was at this point when our otherwise flawless decision making for the evening went awry: another jug of sangria, and an impulsive decision to hit up the meatpacking district.

Gotta love Tia Pol!

Pictures available at: http://dru.gobbl.com

Nov 08, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Best Sushi for $75-Food Only, 1 person

Ditto JimmyPage. Kirara! Just get the Omakase...it's totally worth it.

Nov 07, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

The Manhattan Cream Puff Conundrum

Came across an interesting entry about someone's cream puff experience on Gobbl.com and wanted to poll the Chow community. Besides Beard Papas, do you know of any other great Manhattan cream puff places?

Inspiration: http://www.gobbl.com/blog/595

Nov 07, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Stanton Social Review

Another wonderful blog on an experience at Stanton Social that's a great read for all you Hounders!

"The More the Merrier

Stanton Social is one of those restaurants that reek of old world charm. The dimly lit dining area and the cozy booths make it very warm and inviting. Dishes are all in small portions and are meant to be enjoyed family style, something that adds to its homey vibe.

Nikki, Lorraine, and I decided on this spot for our little middle-school reunion brunch. The dishes were well-sized (at least for my friends) and were all very well prepared. And family style enabled us to share/taste different dishes - perfect for our indecisive natures. trust me, we wanted them all.

We ordered: bruschetta (one of my favorites because of the freshness and richness of the flavor, a really wonderful start to the meal), salmon eggs benedict, apple and brie quesadilla, french onion soup dumplings (another favorite and a very modern take on the traditional Chinese soup dumplings), lemon blueberry pancakes (yet another favorite because it was sweet, but not too sweet), herb frites with chili mayo (breakfast of champions), and last but not least, warm sugar coated doughnuts with caramel sauce (need I say more?)..."

Pictures available at: http://www.gobbl.com/blog/590

Nov 06, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Autumn Tasting Menu at Bouley - Report

Just thought I'd add to the opinions:

Having earned the only 29 out of a possible 30 food-rating in the New York Zagat Survey to date, I arrived at Bouley expecting nothing short of perfection. Setting expecations is always a dangerous thing, but with the likes of David Bouley comandeering my meal for this evening, I felt I had license to do so.

I did not know there was such thing as a friendly Frenchman until we were greeted by the host, who was polite and very forgiving at the fact that we mixed up Broadway with West Broadway and showed up for our reservation nearly 30 minutes late on what looked like yet another packed dinner service. Very surprising, since I was just waiting to get slammed by a dose of French snobbery.

I think the best way to pass judgement on a restaurant's full calibre is through it's tasting menu. It's like giving the chef a blank canvas to work with and telling the chef to throw his best shot at you. In spite of the 2-course a la carte orders my eating partners for the evening placed, I opted for the $95 6-course tasting menu curious to see what Bouley would come up with, and slightly interested to see how they would time the dishes with my partners'.

My feelings for what came out of the kitchen are mixed. The crusted Florida shrimp with baby squid and sea scallops was really quite wonderful (my amateur food photography skills does not do the dish justice). Beautifully battered, drizzled with a tasty truffle infused herbal broth. I found the chilled maine lobster, though, to be sub-par and on the chewy side. Presentation-wise, it looked like I was eating some type of organ. The gelee glazing's resemblance to a mucus-like film did not exactly help.

Also, I felt the chocolate molten souffle that was featured on the tasting menu was much too cliche for a restaurant of Bouley's standard. Give me something more interesting, please (same goes with the sashimi-grade tuna starter that is offered as an option--thank goodness it wasn't chopped up and renamed to a tuna tartare of sorts). The complimentary dessert platter that featured a selection of traditional macaroons, tarts, and truffles was a nice touch, but nothing compared to the likes of Ladurée, or even Tartine for that matter. Props for being inventive with the passionfruit rice pudding, though I had Rice to Riches earlier in the day so was not too thrilled at the prospect of eating more pudding.

By New York City fine dining standards, service (while friendly) was a little rough around the edges. Elementary mistakes, such as mixing up our orders, should never really happen. And it did, more than once. Personally, it didn't really bother me and these are just observations (and it's fun to bitch).

A business once considered the pinnacle of New York haute cuisine lends itself to even the pettiest of scrutinies, and I may have sounded like a whiny little bitch. Taking a step back and looking at the bigger picture, Bouley is a fine restaurant that serves very tasty food. Definitely go and experience it for yourself, just be prepared to lower your expectations a little and understand that Bouley has probably lost a lot of its sparkle since its high-flying mid-to-late 90's days which earned its 29 Zagat food-rating.

Pictures of dishes mentioned above accessible at: http://www.gobbl.com/blog/417

Oct 27, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Reporting Live from Degustation...

Thought I'd share my experience with the Chow community:

A Great Dinner for Two

I don't know about you, but "Degustation" was not in my SAT vocabulary. For a word that sounds so...well, disgusting...I was pleasantly surprised to learn that it actually means "to taste or savor carefully or appreciatively." How very appropriate for a restaurant name that sounds so inappropriate, don't you think?

Anyway.

Degustation's counter-style seating arrangement is definitely not appropriate for large groups, but for a sophisticated, laid-back dinner date catch-up with a friend, is really quite perfect. And what's best about Degustation is that, for what you get, their price-points are very reasonable. 8 beautifully prepared tapas, 2 glasses of wine, and 2 beers came to about $55/person. Plus the feeling of being part of the kitchen as your chef carefully prepares every dish right in front of you is a real treat.

Notable dishes of the evening were the croquettes which were warm, creamy, and fresh out of the deep fryer, a wonderfully prepared seared foie gras with fig, and an interesting rendition pork belly served with peppers in a watermelon base. The only item which I would advise against is the chocolate and fried banana dessert, which to be frank, was quite tasteless.

Other than that, well done, Mr. Lamb. I'll be heading back soon!

*For pictures of dishes mentioned above, feel free to check out my blog page: http://dru.gobbl.com

Oct 27, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

11 Madison Park tonight (Friday)

Ho Hum, Daniel Humm.

Eleven Madison Park displays all the elements of the New York fine-dining restaurant (from the complimentary amuse bouches, petit fours, and take-home gifts for the ladies), but lacked in overall execution. Dishes that were plated beautifully and looked promising very often fell short of expectations taste-wise. By no means was the food bad--in fact, by normal standards, it was pretty good--but when you're dishing out $95 for four courses, you expect something that'll pop with flavor in your mouth and make you go "mmmmm," at the very least.

To be frank, I enjoyed the amuse-bouches far more than the actual entrees. Come with eager anticipation for the goat cheese layered between delicately prepared pastry flakes, as well as the macaroons with a foie-gras center. I was quite pleased when my friend Tiffany decided she didn't want hers and was able to gobble (haha) an extra one. Score!

For my chosen appetizer, I had a duo of foie gras that featured a foie gras pate and foie gras brulee. In terms of taste, the pate wasn't anything remarkable, and you could probably get the same thing at any French deli. I appreciated the brulee, with a crispy-sweet and velvety-savory playing off each other really nicely. Next, came a bouillabasse of prawn, scallop, mussels, squid, and cod. Sadly, the lemongrass broth that the sweet and succulent seafood was bathed in overwhelmed the dish entirely. For my main course, I opted for a lavendar honey glazed duck, which for me, was the best of the 3. Though a little gamey, the crispy, flavorful honey glazed fatty goodness of the duck skin was enough for me to give this dish a thumbs up.

Items on the dessert menu were far too sophisticated for us and we had a hard time deciphering exactly what "black mission" was. Turns out, it's a kind of fig. Ooh-la-la! Without digressing further, desserts again looked far prettier than they tasted...as were the petit-fours. We appreciated the gesture, though, and left a 20% tip.

A third of the price of Per Se, a third as good. In my humble opinion, your $120 (with wine) will take you much further at a fine-dining alternative such as Bouley.

------------------------------
I like to eats.
http://dru.gobbl.com

Oct 27, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Eleven Madison Park

I am back with the verdict, taken from my blog at http://dru.gobbl.com:

Ho Hum, Daniel Humm.

Eleven Madison Park displays all the elements of the New York fine-dining restaurant (from the complimentary amuse bouches, petit fours, and take-home gifts for the ladies), but lacked in overall execution. Dishes that were plated beautifully and looked promising very often fell short of expectations taste-wise. By no means was the food bad--in fact, by normal standards, it was pretty good--but when you're dishing out $95 for four courses, you expect something that'll pop with flavor in your mouth and make you go "mmmmm," at the very least.

To be frank, I enjoyed the amuse-bouches far more than the actual entrees. Come with eager anticipation for the goat cheese layered between delicately prepared pastry flakes, as well as the macaroons with a foie-gras center. I was quite pleased when my friend Tiffany decided she didn't want hers and was able to gobble (haha) an extra one. Score!

For my chosen appetizer, I had a duo of foie gras that featured a foie gras pate and foie gras brulee. In terms of taste, the pate wasn't anything remarkable, and you could probably get the same thing at any French deli. I appreciated the brulee, with a crispy-sweet and velvety-savory playing off each other really nicely. Next, came a bouillabasse of prawn, scallop, mussels, squid, and cod. Sadly, the lemongrass broth that the sweet and succulent seafood was bathed in overwhelmed the dish entirely. For my main course, I opted for a lavendar honey glazed duck, which for me, was the best of the 3. Though a little gamey, the crispy, flavorful honey glazed fatty goodness of the duck skin was enough for me to give this dish a thumbs up.

Items on the dessert menu were far too sophisticated for us and we had a hard time deciphering exactly what "black mission" was. Turns out, it's a kind of fig. Ooh-la-la! Without digressing further, desserts again looked far prettier than they tasted...as were the petit-fours. We appreciated the gesture, though, and left a 20% tip.

A third of the price of Per Se, a third as good. In my humble opinion, your $120 (with wine) will take you much further at a fine-dining alternative such as Bouley.

Oct 25, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Going to Yasuda after 9pm - will the sushi be not as fresh as if I go at 7?

I highly doubt 2 hours will make a difference, Singar. Either way, I think you are good--according to Tony Bourdain, restaurants get their fish from vendors every Tuesday and Thursday, so if he's right, you're in for some great sushi tonight!

-------------------------------
I like to eats.
http://dru.gobbl.com

Oct 25, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

The best place you have eaten in the past 4 weeks in Manhattan.

I'd have to say Gari (not Sushi of Gari) on the UES. Sophisticated (but easy going and laid back) atmosphere, solid service, and probably the freshest (and most creative) sushi I've had in a long, long time. Bravo! Feel free to check out pictures from my meal here: http://dru.gobbl.com

Oct 25, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Eleven Madison Park

Having a meal at Eleven Madison Park this evening. Any suggestions? To go for the tasting menu, or to not go for the tasting menu? Anyone tried the +$150 Alba Truffle selection on the menu?

Oct 25, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Casual dining West Village.

Kick back with a Tiger beer at Fatty Crab, located on Husdon St. Really tasty and authentic Singaporean/Malaysian cuisine (pork buns, nasi lemak, asam laksa). Feel free to check out some pictures at: http://www.gobbl.com/blog/426

Enjoy!

Oct 24, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Spotted Pig Suggestions?

Am off to Spotted Pig for a late dinner. Any suggestions on what to order?

-----------------------------
I like to eats.
http://dru.gobbl.com

Oct 19, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Last year Per Se - what now?

Also, see if you can arrange something special with L'atelier de Joel Robuchon at the Four Seasons. Booking the whole bar/counter for your company and arranging a customized menu might be a nice touch. As long as you are willing to flash the cash, these places will bend backwards for you and cater to your needs. Good luck!

------------------------------
I like to eats.
http://dru.gobbl.com

Oct 19, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

Last year Per Se - what now?

Wow, that is a stellar list and near impossible to top. Per Se is the pinnacle of New York fine dining in my opinion. In order to compensate for the inferior food by choosing a place other than those mentiioned above, perhaps look into places with a Chef's table in the kitchen? Or something "fun," like Degustation (nowhere near as fancy as Per Se, Alaine Ducasse, etc...). What if you called in advanced and reserved Degustation and tried to organize a special menu?

-----------------------------
I like to eats.
http://dru.gobbl.com

Oct 19, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan

I just have to say this: I hate Rocco's on Bleecker

I live in the neighborhood but have yet to go...I kinda wanna check it out just to see how big of an a**hole these guys can be!

-----------------------------
I like to eats.
http://dru.gobbl.com

Oct 18, 2007
druz99 in Manhattan