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FINALLY... a real, honest-to-Hashem method for making real lower east side SALT FERMENTED KOSHER DILL PICKLES, as directed by Moe, a 90+ year old former pickle master

Yes, I did. It seems a little stronger than the average pickling spice, so I put in too much. I liked the flavor it gave and would order it again, if I don't run out of the pounds of it I bought!

Oct 19, 2012
kakeeler in Home Cooking

Are Olives dyed to look more appealing to the "Olive Bar" Consumer

We grow olives. The color change is a degree of ripeness, similar to the color change in grapes. The chlorophyll is being exchanged in the fruit for polyphenols. Some olives, much like Chardonnay grapes, will always be green in color. We only brine our olives in salt, some people use lye, but the salt method takes much, much longer. It takes us eight to nine months of brining, and contstantly changing the brine, washing the olives, putting them in the fresh brine. The lye takes only 24 hours. However, we believe that the salt brine produces better olives, otherwise, we'd do it the easier way. Also regarding color, you'll notice that the olive oil produced from greener, less ripe olives is also greener, whereas, the oil from riper olives is more golden. If you prefer more buttery, soft oils, choose a golden colored oil. If you prefer the more pungent, grassier type of olive oil, choose a greener colored oil. I've attached a photo of this year's olives, which are not quite ripe, and the ripened olives, from a previous year, so you can see the stages of development. Enjoy eating olives and olive oil!

Oct 08, 2012
kakeeler in General Topics

FINALLY... a real, honest-to-Hashem method for making real lower east side SALT FERMENTED KOSHER DILL PICKLES, as directed by Moe, a 90+ year old former pickle master

After reading your threads on pickling spice, I actually found this spice on Amazon, and it appears it has the ingredients you discussed, while leaving out the ones you thought should be left out. I ordered two containers, in case there's a run on it. Here's the link: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000...

Sep 18, 2012
kakeeler in Home Cooking

FINALLY... a real, honest-to-Hashem method for making real lower east side SALT FERMENTED KOSHER DILL PICKLES, as directed by Moe, a 90+ year old former pickle master

Great info, we really enjoyed reading it! My husband's family came over during the war and had been in the fish brining business in the Netherlands. Every holiday, we would hear all the senior members of the family reminiscing about the pickles that were abundant in barrels and crocks. Our naive thinking at the time had been, how hard could this be, we'll whip up a batch. That was about 15 years ago. Every time we make them, someone mentions, no, no, they need a little more of this or that. Surprisingly, after this period of time, our trial-and-error recipe is very, very close to yours. We also live part-time in the L.A. area and have found your estimate to be dead-on, one to two days (depending on the weather). Sometimes three. We also grow our own olives and have always only brined them in Diamond Kosher salt -- no lye, no vinegar. We have become so fanatical about the pickles that we're now growing our pickling cukes and dill heads and flowers on a farm up north, but now I believe I must make my own pickling spice. I did find a recipe for pickling spice on a jewish food forum that seems somewhat close to what you described later down the thread of what was sent to you by the rabbi. Here's the link for that: http://www.jewishfood-list.com/recipe.... We still haven't achieved the perfection we've assigned these pickles in our minds, but with your tips, a new pickling spice, and Mo watching over us, we believe we're on our way. Thanks again!

Jul 16, 2012
kakeeler in Home Cooking
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