nofunlatte's Profile

Title Last Reply

From the Farmers’ Market to the Freezer

I do both. I can jams, chutneys, that sort of thing (and a few pickles), but I also freeze produce. And while I realize the focus of the article is on produce, the freezer is most excellent for bread. My bread-baking is done in the cooler seasons (Oct. through early May), so I like to keep some in the freezer for the summer. When my folks visited me last month, I pulled out a loaf of no-knead bread that still had excellent chew (crust not as crisp as freshly baked, but the flavor was very good). AFTER I thawed it, I noticed that I made the loaf in Jan. 2013.

about 1 hour ago
nofunlatte in Food Media & News

From the Farmers’ Market to the Freezer

sandiasingh--The Dane County Farmers Market is fabulous! It was the first stop on my Heartland Food Road Trip last summer. I was told not to eat breakfast, as you'd get full from all the samples. Glad I followed that advice.

about 1 hour ago
nofunlatte in Food Media & News

Is it okay to ask guests at a suprise party to pay to attend?

When I was a poor graduate student, this would not have been a trivial amount. Not now that I have a good job, but when you are trying to make ends meet on a small stipend, $15 can be substantial. It IS in the eye of the beholder.

about 3 hours ago
nofunlatte in Not About Food

Is it okay to ask guests at a suprise party to pay to attend?

That's classy.

Jul 04, 2015
nofunlatte in Not About Food

About rice as pie weights

I don't see why not--the color of the rice shouldn't affect it. The whole idea is to have something with a bit of heft (to keep the foil in place). I have a bag full of chick peas that I use for pie weights.

What Unusual or Uncommon Vegetables Do You Eat - And how do you prepare them?

Yes, kohlrabi! It is unusual in parts of the US. I grew up on the east coast and my great-aunt (German immigrant) grew it in her garden, so I ate it frequently as I was growing up. Never saw it elsewhere. About 10 years ago, I moved to Indiana and see it every summer at the farmers market. Occasionally, I see it for sale at Meijer.

It is great raw, but I also like it cooked, either lightly steamed with a vinaigrette or creamed with a white sauce (you can add some of the chopped leaves to add a color contrast).

Jun 30, 2015
nofunlatte in Home Cooking

Radish cooking?

I've never roasted them, but I do enjoy them briefly sauteed, then braised in chicken stock and finished with a touch of vinegar.

Jun 27, 2015
nofunlatte in Home Cooking

Your dirty little kitchen secret

I do not hull strawberries.

I'm blocking for the name of a dessert

Clafouti is French and has fruit (and eggs and flour), but it's not really like a Dutch baby.

Jun 18, 2015
nofunlatte in General Topics

Sorbet, ice cream, and other frosty treats

I made a vanilla-ginger-creme fraiche ice cream last week for a dinner party dessert. Fabulous! One of the best I've ever made. I used duck eggs, which I find richer and make even better ice cream (and mayonnaise). I've also made chocolate sorbet.

Jun 17, 2015
nofunlatte in Home Cooking

Sorbet, ice cream, and other frosty treats

And you made that wonderful mint ice cream that you posted about the other day!

Jun 17, 2015
nofunlatte in Home Cooking

Mint Ice Cream

Good luck with your chocolate mint next year! I tried some in tea that I bought at the farmers market--it was delicious! Might be an interesting (and complementary) mint to use in your ice cream.

Jun 16, 2015
nofunlatte in Home Cooking

Mint Ice Cream

Congrats on a winning ice cream recipe! Did you use spearmint or peppermint?

I made ginger-vanilla-creme fraiche ice cream for a dinner party this past weekend. That, too, will see some repeat business at my place.

Jun 15, 2015
nofunlatte in Home Cooking

Your Best Dairy Free Dessert

Sabayon with berries would be nice for spring/summer. For fall, how about chocolate sabayon (egg yolks, sugar, cocoa, water) with sliced pears?

Jun 14, 2015
nofunlatte in Home Cooking

Book Recommendation

Robin Mather's The Feast Nearby: How I lost my job, buried a marriage, and found my way by keeping chickens, foraging, preserving, bartering, and eating locally (all on forty dollars a week). Yes, that's the title and the full subtitle (following the colon). A former food writer, Mather, in the course of less than a week, loses her job and her marriage (newspaper layoff and then her husband left her.) She moves to a small lakeside cottage in SW Michigan and forms relationships with the locals. The book is laid out as a seasonal voyage (Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter) and she shares with us her journey. Some reviewers online faulted her for not spending much time talking about her marriage and its dissolution, but I think that is a PLUS. The book's focus is on eating locally and not just getting by, but thriving (she was a food writer for the Chicago Tribune, so no 5-for-a-dollar ramen here!) It's a look into her personal philosophy. There are, of course, recipes in here as well. I've read it twice so far (and given a couple of copies to friends as gifts).

Also, Coming Home to Eat by Gary Paul Nabhan (on a return to local foods endemic to a geographic regaion). It's from 2001, when the local food movement was barely a blip on the radar in most places). Nabhan is affiliated with the U. of Arizona and was a recipient of a Macarthur Grant about 25 years ago.

Sugar causes cancer!

The quinoa and chia have to be raw, too ;) And you have to eat between your yoga poses. While consciously uncoupling.

Sugar causes cancer!

I imagine my 95-year old grandmother would have lived to be 112 if she'd only avoided sugar.

Your dirty little kitchen secret

If it's in front of guests, it's not a secret anymore! BTW, I do this too.

Jun 09, 2015
nofunlatte in General Topics

Krud Kutter

Goo Gone was great for removing scuff marks on my old vinyl kitchen floor.

Jun 09, 2015
nofunlatte in Not About Food

Jamming, Canning and Preserving 2015

I can help with Question 2. "Cannot be stirred down" means that bubbles continue to appear even if you've just stirred (when the boiling/bubbling starts, you can calm things down with a stir--you stir and it takes a little while for more bubbles to reappear). Another term for this would be a full, rolling boil.

Jun 09, 2015
nofunlatte in Home Cooking
1

Interview with Deborah "Leafy" Madison: The Queen of Greens

Thanks for sharing that. A fun article about an interesting woman.

Jun 08, 2015
nofunlatte in Food Media & News

Jamming, Canning and Preserving 2015

Good to know. Is this a special type of pectin? If so, I'll have to look for it. I've been using the jar I had left from last year's canning season!

Jun 08, 2015
nofunlatte in Home Cooking

CH Pie Mavens--I Need Your Help! 2 Questions

I had blueberries in the freezer (and I'm in "clean up, clean out, get rid of stuff" mode big time. I wanted to try making the filling ahead of time (I'd made the crust ahead of time, too), because of a busy work week--knew I'd have time to bake the pie the day of the event, but not make the filling and the pie and still have it cool off enough before I transported it 5 hours away. But I agree--canned filling is pretty awful.

But cooking is fun!

Jamming, Canning and Preserving 2015

PharmaChick-- I've made strawberry jam from Sherry Brooks Vinton's Put 'Em Up, both classic (pectin-free) and with Pomona. Both times I used 1 cup of sugar for every 4 cups of strawberries (sliced). For blueberry jam, I used 1-1/3 cups of sugar for 8 cups of blueberries (she calls for anywhere from 1-2 cups of sugar) using the Pomona pectin and 1 cup sugar for 4 cups blueberries for classic.

I'm not sure what kind of sugar amounts the Ball recipe calls for.

Jun 08, 2015
nofunlatte in Home Cooking
1

CH Pie Mavens--I Need Your Help! 2 Questions

Update: The crust was good. Very good. Super flaky. Like some of the party guests.

The pie filling itself? Not that great--a bit too gummy (kind of like a mass-produced supermarket pie). The pie got eaten, but I won't be canning pie filling any time soon. Better to make the filling from scratch at the time I plan to bake the pie. But I did like the experimentation aspect of the whole experience!

Jun 08, 2015
nofunlatte in Home Cooking

Please help- Pork tenderloin

RED WINE-SOY GRILLED PORK TENDERLOIN

Pork
2 pork tenderloins (about 2 to 2-1/2 lbs total), trimmed of silverskin

Sauce ingredients
¼ - ½ cup soy sauce
1 cup red wine
2 tablespoons sesame oil (dark sesame oil, sold in small bottles)
2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
2 tablespoons ketchup
1 cup chopped onion
3 cloves chopped garlic
1 tablespoon chopped fresh ginger
1 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes (optional)
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
2 tablespoons honey

Mix sauce ingredients together. Put tenderloins in large plastic bag. Pour sauce ingredients over tenderloins and seal bag. Place in refrigerator and let marinate for at least 8 hours. Turn several times over the course of the marination.

Remove tenderloins from refrigerator and grill over medium-high heat, about 8-10 minutes per side (for all four sides). When internal temperature at thickest part of meat reaches about 145°, remove from heat and place on platter for about 5 minutes.

While pork is grilling, pour excess sauce into saucepan and boil until reduced by half, about 10-12 minutes. Serve as a sauce with the meat.

Serves 4-6

Jun 07, 2015
nofunlatte in Home Cooking
1

CH Pie Mavens--I Need Your Help! 2 Questions

Thanks, all. Well, I did a little of both--I added 2 Tbsp of juice (not enough to affect the blueberry flavor) and about 1/4 cup of frozen berries (because that's all I had and I wasn't about to run to the store). It baked up like a regular pie and it some juices bubbled like a regular pie. The big test will be this afternoon when it gets eaten.

Jun 06, 2015
nofunlatte in Home Cooking

CH Pie Mavens--I Need Your Help! 2 Questions

Question 1: What is the ratio of powdered tapioca starch to tapioca pearls (e.g. Minute tapioca)? I have the former, with a cherry pie recipe that uses the latter.

Question 2: The other week I posted about my ClearJel Misadventure. I used a blueberry pie filling canning recipe from the Ball Book (the big one, not the magazine-sized one) and I used Instant ClearJel instead of regular (honestly, I've never used the stuff, nor heard of it, so I didn't know there was a difference). Anyway, I'd like to bake a blueberry pie tomorrow. The filling is fairly thick--a bit more solid than regular canned filling. Can I add a little bit of juice to approximate the canned filling (i.e. loosen it up a bit) or should I just try to bake the pie with the filling "as is"?

Thanks in advance (and apologies for so many pie-related queries--immigrant parents, so I have no pie baking grandma to share with me her expertise).

Jun 05, 2015
nofunlatte in Home Cooking

Baking pie crust tonight for Saturday?

In the fridge on Friday (even during the day) should be fine. I've never prebaked a crust two days ahead of time, so I worry a bit about humidity affecting the crispness of the crust. Being stored airtight might work, assuming that you are not trapping any moisture.

FYI, the basement may be cooler, but it's unlikely to have less ambient water vapor than the rest of the house. The RELATIVE humidity (mass of water vapor compared to maximum mass of water vapor that can be held at a particular temperature), however, will likely be higher (given the cooler temperature in the basement) while the ABSOLUTE humidity (mass of water vapor compared to a unit volume of air, usually g/kg, won't be.

Jun 04, 2015
nofunlatte in Home Cooking

Help w/ homemade "buttermilk"

Good call on whether the milk (or the cream) are pasteurized or ultra-pasteurized.

Jun 04, 2015
nofunlatte in Home Cooking