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what is the fastest pour: Kegerator or Jockey Box

Also, the Jockey Box can give a faster pour due to the longer lines (needed to cool the beer) requiring a higher pressure to pour properly.

Also, a quick tip - when pouring you want to try to snap the tap open, and then snap it closed nice and fast. Half open gives a foamy pour. I like to hold it near the base of the tap handle, rather than at the top.

Jul 31, 2012
Mcooper in Beer

what is the fastest pour: Kegerator or Jockey Box

I've had lots of experience using both. Jockey boxes are great in the way that you don't have to have the keg chilled (if it's less then say, 85 degrees out) and you will still get a decent pour that's cold. Throwing the keg in a tub of ice will definitely give a less foamy pour more consistently. For an event like that I would use a jockey box for the portability benefits. Some tips:

Put ice in the cooler after there is beer in the lines - or you can have occasional problems with the lines in the cooler freezing.
As far as CO2 pressure goes, if it's foamy, turn it down not up. Often times if there is too much pressure in the keg then as soon as it goes into the lines the CO2 will leave the solution giving a foamy beer.

Do you have any specific questions regarding either of the equipment?

Jul 31, 2012
Mcooper in Beer

How Do You Like Your BBQ Sauce?

Yeah, usually it's apple cider vinegar, crushed red pepper, a little salt and sugar. I'm sure some put in some cayenne if they feel like it. Served along side whole hog chopped BBQ (not pulled shoulder and a tomato/vinegar based sauce like is popular in the west - it's also very good, just not my fave) It works really well to bring out the flavors of the meat.

Jul 20, 2012
Mcooper in General Topics

How Do You Like Your BBQ Sauce?

Vinegar and Red pepper. Eastern NC bbq and sauce is my fave!

Jul 19, 2012
Mcooper in General Topics

Kelp

Hello,

I will start by saying that I am completely unfamiliar with eating seaweed, other then some dried green sheets that my wife bought to snack on a few times - and in sushi a long time ago when I used to eat fish. I have been doing some reading recently and have a few questions, I figured the veg/vegan board will have the most know how with this regard.

Seaweed contains carrageenan, can I simply add seaweed to soups/stocks to help thicken in a similar way to gelatin when I make a meat/bone stock? I read that they are quite high in glutamates, a bonus for a stock.

Does anybody have any experience going to a rocky beach during low tide and collecting your own seaweed to eat? I live quite far from a decent grocery store, but quite close to a beach - a lot of kelp around, there are some other varieties that I am unsure the name of, also...is it all edible? :)

Thank you all for your responses.

Jul 15, 2012
Mcooper in Vegetarian & Vegan

Use Spoiled Milk in place of buttermilk?

Sorry for the confusion Bmorecupcake. Cowboyardee is correct.

Regarding the confusion as to why you might not get buttermilk due to milk solids - that was a misunderstanding on my part - can't have been paying full attention. I've made cultured butter in the very same way you're making buttermilk, only I used cream that wasn't sour and added buttermilk. I took it a step further to get cultured butter, and buttermilk as an end result - both were quite delicious!

I believe there are about a half dozen lactic acid producing bacteria often found in milk, all of them are fine for consumption and develop their own, slightly different sour flavor. There are more around, but they are rarer in milk. The pathogens found in spoiled milk will lend their own funk, which you will most likely be able to smell, or you will see some as a mold that is producing toxins.

So you aren't 100% safe drinking your buttermilk, some people wouldn't drink it, some would, if it smelt and looked good to me, I would :-)

Jul 13, 2012
Mcooper in Home Cooking

Which machine/device(s) will give me the absolute best cup of coffee I can possibly brew at home?

For me it's the Chem-ex. I've not had a cleaner tasting coffee.

Jul 12, 2012
Mcooper in Cookware

Use Spoiled Milk in place of buttermilk?

Troubles may arise if too many unfriendly bugs have taken hold of the gone off milk before you add your more favorable cultures. They will most likely go unnoticed unscathed, you may see them take hold or smell them eventually, or all might be fine until you eat it and get sick. It all depends on how much the milk had turned already and with what bacteria, so there isn't a real practical way of telling.

That being said, if the milk is just sour, to me that is good bacteria producing lactic acid and would probably be find to overwhelm with some more buttermilk cultures to give it all a fighting chance. You wont end up with buttermilk however, due to the milk proteins that are still present. Something more Yogurt-y I would expect, which you would then be able to turn into delicious cultured butter and buttermilk.

Jul 11, 2012
Mcooper in Home Cooking
1

Use Spoiled Milk in place of buttermilk?

I once cultured some bacteria from regular supermarket milk that had gone off. It turned out to be quite closely related to the bubonic plague and had the potential to make you very ill. So I tend to steer clear. :)

Jul 11, 2012
Mcooper in Home Cooking

What did you have for breakfast today? Part 2

Made a Benedict for my wife and I this morning - she's working late tonight.

Homemade WW toast, nice and thick.
Shredded chicken on top
Sliced tomato on top of the chicken
Poached egg
Hollandaise

Pan fried potato on the side (in some saved bacon grease from other breakfasts). Delicious. My first time making a hollandaise, it turned out much easier then I expected. :)

Jul 10, 2012
Mcooper in General Topics

Taco Bell goes "gourmet"

Thank you, I agree and am pleased to not discuss it further. :)

Jul 07, 2012
Mcooper in Chains

Taco Bell goes "gourmet"

It was San Francisco. I thought the same as you do before I actually looked at the maps closely. Not by any means saying that it is impossible to get to places like that in poorer neighborhoods, just that often, it's a great deal more difficult. Have to walk further (couple miles can be a lot for some people especially with a weeks worth of groceries), spend more on the bus system. Where's the more affluent neighborhoods often just had a short walk and not even have to take the bus at all.

It's not the only reason poorer people don't often get healthier foods, but it plays a part. That along side advertising that is focused on low income minorities, poor education due to poorly funded school systems (why would they go to all the effort of eating healthier if they don't even know why they should? or even how to?), and racism in general all play a part in it.

Jul 07, 2012
Mcooper in Chains

Taco Bell goes "gourmet"

I did a study with GIS software once, I mapped all of the fast food stores, 7-11 style markets, regular grocery stores, and farmers markets in relationship to average income of the area. Then I added in accessibility factors - distance to walk (adding in a factor for hills etc.), bus accessibility, bike, car, etc. Not a comprehensive study by all means but I like to think I didn't leave anything major out to give a good general overview. Poor neighborhoods really did seem to have a very limited option as far as food goes. A lot of the time limited to 7-11 style mini marts, and with a much much higher density of fast food joints. Some places it was literally their only option. Some times they had pretty OK access to a decent market, but more often then not, they didn't.

Jul 07, 2012
Mcooper in Chains

Composting kitchen waste [split from Cookware board]

San Francisco has a similar plan put in place, it sounds almost identical actually.

They also encourage cardboard milk cartons with the wax that cant be recycled, pet, and meat waste to be put into the green bins. What happens is, it all gets shipped to a facility and put in a huge, long, plastic bag where it sits for 3 months to decompose. The bag is cut off, the compost is sifted for anything that diddn't decompose, plastic garbage will be discarded and anything decomposable gets put into the next bag to finish. The compost is then sent to organic farmers in the area. Usually vineyards, I think.

To make sure it's all safe for gardening, they ensure that it reaches a certain temp, 140 degrees I think, for three days straight during the composting.

Hope I could shed some light - I learned it all from a class I took several years ago while I was still getting my undergraduate degree at SFSU in a class called the geography of garbage! :)

Jul 03, 2012
Mcooper in Gardening