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New England Lobster Rolls

It is ONE of the ways to make an authentic lobster roll, and probably the most popular way. That said, some folks eliminate the mayonnaise and drizzle melted butter over the whole thing. Red's Eats in Wiscasset is one such place, and their long, long line of customers attests its' goodness!

about 23 hours ago
Jessiet in Recipes

Having problem with lard for pie crust

This link has been very helpful to me. Yes, clearly leaf lard that I am looking for, since it is harder. Thank you so much!

Jul 09, 2014
Jessiet in Home Cooking

Having problem with lard for pie crust

Thank you everyone. Armed with the info I need, I begin my search!

Jul 08, 2014
Jessiet in Home Cooking

Having problem with lard for pie crust

Thanks, biondanonima! You may be right. Now the search begins for the leaf fat.

Jul 08, 2014
Jessiet in Home Cooking

Having problem with lard for pie crust

Amen to that "no pie at all" comment! Yes, I am familiar with what is known as leaf lard. Have not been able to find it locally, however. One of the problems is that I'm in a fairly small town. I am about 60 miles from Philadelphia, so I will inquire about a prosciutto maker there. So are you saying that they use leaf lard in making it? I appreciate your input.

Jul 08, 2014
Jessiet in Home Cooking

Having problem with lard for pie crust

Thank you. Having softer lard may require less liquid being added, but it completely changes the texture of the crust. If the fat is fully incorporated into the flour, you will end up with a very rich crust, but it will not be flaky at all.

Jul 08, 2014
Jessiet in Home Cooking

Having problem with lard for pie crust

I have always used lard for my pie crusts; it makes a wonderful crust. However, over the last few years, I am having a problem finding lard that is firm enough to use. I normally buy my lard from the local butcher, but he seems to have a problem getting it firm enough now. Just this morning, I tried grating frozen lard into a bowl, with hopes of refreezing the lard and getting it made before it comes to room temp and ruins the whole thing. My butcher told me that to get firmer lard, it must be stirred at a certain temperature for a certain amount of time. I'm not a food chemist, but I just know that apparently his formula has not been working lately. I would prefer not using the lard in supermarkets; most of contains BHT or some other type of preservative. I recently tried making pie crust with Crisco, but did not care for the results. Before I spend too much more time and ending up with unsatisfactory results, I wonder if any of you foodies could give me suggestions for a wonderful, flavorful, flaky pie crust. Butter and shortening? Ratios? For the lard crust, I always used 1 part flour to 3 parts flour, and it worked beautifully. What do you use? Do you have any suggestions for me? Help!

Jul 08, 2014
Jessiet in Home Cooking

What's for Dinner #308 - A Midsummer's Night's Dream Dinner Edition! [through June 25, 2014]

Think I need to add Prague to my bucket list. Have fun!

Jun 26, 2014
Jessiet in Home Cooking
1

What's for Dinner #308 - A Midsummer's Night's Dream Dinner Edition! [through June 25, 2014]

Here's the recipe for the Indian-spiced sweet potatoes. We love this side. Serves 4.

Indian-Spiced Sweet Potatoes:
2 large sweet potatoes, cut into 1 1/2" cubes
2 tablespoons ghee or butter, melted
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon curry powder
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon paprika
1/4 teaspoon turmeric
1/4 teaspoon cardamom
1/8 teaspoon cayenne, or to taste
1. Preheat oven to 425°.
2. Combine all ingredients in large mixing bowl; toss until potatoes completely and evenly coated.
3. Spread on half sheet pan, and roast for 30-40 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes, until potatoes are golden brown.
4. Serve.
Enjoy!

Jun 25, 2014
Jessiet in Home Cooking
2

What's for Dinner #308 - A Midsummer's Night's Dream Dinner Edition! [through June 25, 2014]

Tonight I will be grilling pork tenderloin, and will serve it with chimichurri sauce. Also on the menu is Indian-spiced roasted sweet potatoes and sautéed broccoli and onion, finished with verjus. Can't wait!

Jun 25, 2014
Jessiet in Home Cooking
6

STAUB AND THEIR COLORS!

Hard to imagine, but probably lovely. Their "Titanium", however, was the hands down winner, in my opinion. So elegant, so beautiful, so neutral. Wish they would bring it back. I've been seeking it out for a long time since they discontinued it.

Jun 05, 2014
Jessiet in Cookware

Restaurants in Lancaster

I want to mention that though the article only mentions several upscale eateries, there are many, many more options in Lancaster now. It seems every time I drive downtown, I am surprised by some new restaurant that I hadn't seen before. If you haven't been in Lancaster in ten years, you would be very surprised at the changes in this area. I believe this will continue, now that Lancaster has had a chance to savor really good food. I don't know about Haydn Zug's. It was never that good, in my opinion; highly overrated. That said, there is no comparison to the options available in a large city such as Boston, and you are indeed blessed to live there!

Jun 04, 2014
Jessiet in Pennsylvania

Restaurants in Lancaster

Nice post, ahab! Things are definitely changing in Lancaster; in fact, an article in Philly.com states that the "Lancaster food scene is totally happening". He even compares its vibe to Brooklyn! The thrust of the article is that Lancaster has long grown, bred and raised wonderful and unique product that had been previously shipped to Philadelphia, New York, and other places as well. Wonderful heirloom and organic veg, organic poultry and grass-fed beef, lamb, venison, etc. In fact, Lancaster has some of the finest soil in the United States! Finally, a restaurateur figured out that with all the wonderful meats and vegetables right here, a fine restaurant would be a very good idea indeed. I had long lamented the food scene in my hometown of Lancaster, but it is indeed changing. There is even a new rye distillery called Thistle Finch. Another noteworthy restaurant is Citronnelle, an upscale dining eatery that is very good. I have so often, in the past, eaten at a "fine dining" establishment only to wish I had stayed home and cooked a much finer meal in my own kitchen. That is changing and I, for one, am so glad. Go Lancaster!

Jun 04, 2014
Jessiet in Pennsylvania

Perfect Margarita

I would argue that Blendtec is just as good a blender as Vitamix, and has some clear advantages, such as a square blending jar, and blunted blades. Also very easy to clean. It is used by many juice bars. I love mine.

May 28, 2014
Jessiet in Recipes

Quiche- prebake pie shell or not?

Glad I googled and found this topic. Making an asparagus quiche today and for the first time ever, am NOT blind baking the piecrust! Hooray for the internet, and thanks adamshoe and others!

May 14, 2014
Jessiet in Home Cooking

Is Anyone Finding Morels in Pennsylvania yet?

I live in Lancaster County, PA and am an avid morel hunter. I would love to hear if you're finding morels yet. The weather has been cooler than normal, so they may be a bit late showing up. Hate to take a trek into the woods and risk bringing home more ticks than mushrooms! Where are you finding them?

May 05, 2014
Jessiet in General Topics

Rotisserie for Weber Kettle yay or nay?

The Weber rotisserie is great! I have the charcoal kettle. I'd used it for years before I discovered the rotisserie. The reason the rotisserie keeps things so moist is rather obvious--it is constantly basting with the fat that is on whatever you're cooking on it. This is something that using the indirect method will not do. As the meat goes around, the fats just keep going around also, ever basting. It doesn't drip off; it just bastes, bastes. It is a wonderful accessory to the Weber charcoal grill. One piece of advice I would give is to roast whatever you're grilling at the highest temp possible. This will ensure great browning, moistness and the best flavor.

May 03, 2014
Jessiet in Cookware

Restaurants in Lancaster

Agree!

Apr 29, 2014
Jessiet in Pennsylvania

Ramps are in abundance!

I'm in southeastern PA (Lancaster). How does one distinguish a fiddlehead from another type of fern? And, does anyone know if ramps grow in Lancaster County?

Apr 21, 2014
Jessiet in General Topics

Ramps are in abundance!

Just found this discussion on ramps. I'm in southeast PA (Lancaster County), and would love to know if anyone has found them in this area. Never had them, but since I love leeks, I'm sure I would love ramps as well. Season should be right now, I''m assuming. Hoping I can get some positive replies.

Apr 21, 2014
Jessiet in General Topics

Best pan for flipping eggs

Now you've rekindled my fire to try this with two eggs! Good for you--maybe a You Tube video is in order! :)

Mar 22, 2014
Jessiet in Cookware

Best pan for flipping eggs

I agree with Sirrith. A non-stick pan changes the texture of the egg, making it seem more "rubbery". Don't know the scientific reason, but it's true. I'm sure Harold McGee would know.

Mar 12, 2014
Jessiet in Cookware

Best pan for flipping eggs

Good for you, josephni! Just flipped my first egg this morning--piece of cake (probably beginner's luck)! I used my trusty heavy aluminum omelet pan, which I reserve for eggs only (like the one Julia Child used). I am somewhat hesitant about a non-stick because the butter doesn't cover the entire surface of the pan, so you don't have even lubrication. I have a heavy carbon steel one I'll try next. It's very well seasoned.

Mar 11, 2014
Jessiet in Cookware

Best pan for flipping eggs

I don't have a problem flipping with a spatula; I do them that way now. I have done them the other way, too, but prefer literally "over".

Mar 10, 2014
Jessiet in Cookware

Best pan for flipping eggs

Thanks for the suggestion--never blamed anyone but the cook! :) I do feel, however, that flipping eggs will be an entirely different thing than flipping toast.

Mar 10, 2014
Jessiet in Cookware

Best pan for flipping eggs

Can't wait to try this! I'm sure there's a learning curve. I remember when I first started flipping other things, like veggies or nuts, how many fell on the floor! BUT, with perseverance, even I mastered it! I'm up for the challenge!

Mar 10, 2014
Jessiet in Cookware

Is Farmed Scottish Salmon Safe to Eat?

We love farmed Scottish salmon, but many people say it is a poor choice for many reasons: 1) A few escape from the pens and are introduced to the wild population. 2) They contain concerning amounts of pesticides and other contaminants that may be harmful to the human neurological system, brain, or immunity. I have found many articles stating that for these reasons, it should be eaten only seldom, and some articles recommend eating it no more than 4 times per year! However, I have just come across an article published in October, 2013 in the Seattle Times stating that wild salmon farms, here and abroad, have come a long way in reducing these concerns. Their recommendation is to eat no more than 1 serving per week. I am searching for the truth here. And yes, I love my Scottish salmon, but am not willing to ruin my health to eat. Any insight from you foodies on where the truth lies?

Mar 08, 2014
Jessiet in General Topics

Where to buy Indian Spices online? [moved from Home Cooking]

I used Penzey's for quite a few years, and they are good, but they don't have some of the more exotic ones (like asafetida). To save on shipping expenses, I prefer to do my online spice shopping at one place, and now I am using Whole Spice in Petaluma, CA. I love them; their spices are fresh, reasonably priced, and their customer service is wonderful. They have everything I need (Indian spices included). They also have many specials, reducing their prices by 20 or 30%, or sometimes offer free shipping!

Feb 27, 2014
Jessiet in General Topics

Coffee in America

That's just the way we roll, here in America! I love all kinds of coffee (perhaps except for the Middle Eastern, syrupy thick kind), and love espresso, but still love my American brewed coffee. In fact, sometimes I prefer it. It must be a cultural thing, I guess.

Feb 13, 2014
Jessiet in General Topics

Thomas's English Muffins

My experience is a little different. I didn't know about Bays until I read this thread, but found them at a local chain grocery, so I bought some. My daughter and I did some comparison tasting and we found that: Bays is much higher, and a lot lighter; not as dense. We think Bays has less nooks and crannies, but overall, they taste pretty good. To me, only real negative is a nasty aftertaste that tastes like some kind of chemical. TEM doesn't have this. Clearly, TEM has changed, and used to be better, so I thought I'd prefer Bays, but actually, I do like the denseness of TEM, and they don't have that aftertaste that I'm referring to. Think I'll stick to TEM, as long as I can buy them BOGO.

Feb 11, 2014
Jessiet in General Topics
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