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weird smell from pressure cooker

PS: I see my explanation wasn't quite as clear as it could be: regular steaming took too long. Pressure cooker was done in about 20 minutes. Any longer, and the "bread" caramelizes :) They weren't very good, sadly.

Dec 27, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

weird smell from pressure cooker

I believe this worked - sorta maybe not sure.

I had planned on this after reading your post, however, meantime I had to make one more soup experiment. Into this I accidentally poured about 1/4 cup vinegar instead of 1 Tablespoon...

Although I feel that did the trick, I'm wondering if there was some added maillard or carmel smells; I usually put the meat on the bottom, this time around I added veggies first then the meat, so they wouldn't have "stuck" to the bottom. Eh, probably not the problem - likely the vinegar did the trick. Cool.

Dec 26, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

weird smell from pressure cooker

We have a food called "knedla" which is similar to Bao, Dumplings, Manapuas, or sticky buns, but not as sweet. Simply flour, water, egg, yeast. Sometimes we add stale bread. A family member has intolerances to gluten and eggs, so for fun, I was working on a variation using non wheat flours and various other substitutes. What I found: it took well over 2 hours to fully "cook" the variations in steam, so that was the impetus for purchasing a pressure cooker. See attached results - none were good. But, addressing another contribution below, you can see the steam actually caramelized some of the carbs in one of the flours...

Dec 26, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

weird smell from pressure cooker

I purchased a low cost, 6qt fagor pressure cooker primarily to make quick stocks and experiment with some high-pressure steaming recipes. Never used one before.

All my foods come out smelling very strange; thus far I have made duck, turkey, chicken, and beef stock, several steamed "breads", some braised greens, and a couple different curries - all have that weird smell. It's like a "brown" maybe "caramelized" scent. Never smelled it before, so difficult to characterize. It's not a burnt scent. I was surprised that the scent does not appear to impact the taste - making this an even more curious phenomenon.

I washed the unit very thoroughly when I purchased it, and it's been through the dishwasher several times. Would this be a function of high pressure cooking that I'll find in other pressure cookers, or possibly something wrong with mine? Initially I thought it could be the gasket (it does retain the scent for a few days), but that goes into the dishwasher as well.

Thanks for your time.

Dec 18, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

sous vide vs. braising?

I've been cooking sous vide style for over a year, using a home-made water-immersion circulator (pid, PT-100 probe, relay, fish-tank pump, and 1200W heating element) dunked into a beer cooler.

I've noticed many a time the vacuum-sealed bags puff up a little and get filled with juices from the food - this was especially the case when I did a 10lb brisket for 48 hours.

How is that different from braising, other than environment temps?

Sep 27, 2012
jedovaty in Home Cooking

odd size measuring spoons why no 1/3 tsp

2Tbsp make 1/8 cup. Surprised that didn't make it here over the last three years of the life of this thread! :)

Sep 09, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

What to freeze homemade broth in?

Silicone muffin cups.. like the ice-cube idea, and you can peel the soup out then.

Aug 29, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware
1

does a pan with these specs exist?

I would like a large pan similar to a saute pan, that has softly curved/angled sides instead of straight up/down, similar to a fry pan, but taller.

Bonus points if it has a lid with a bit of doming to it.

Would I be looking at a circular au gratin pan? Or.. ? Does it exist?

No brands, just looking for name/style of this. Many thanks!

Aug 29, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

Best way to remove a non-stick from carbon steel?

This has probably become a "principle of the thing" to get this accomplished, but I wouldn't recommend it. First, not worth the trouble with cheap enough woks out there, and second, how do you know you get the whole non-stick coating off? What if you get most, but not all, put it in high heat, accidentally inhale the fumes, and find yourself in the hospital?

I had a side project where I tried to remove the nonstick coating off an old pan that was destined for high heats. I took my random orbital porter cable with a paint-stripping wire brush, followed by various degrees of sand paper to the pan, spent a couple hours polishing away. Looked like it did the job, but then I got this sudden feeling.. how do I know? Wasn't worth the risk to me, tossed the pan.

If you go with it, good luck. if you don't do the sand blasting route, do it mechanically with an orbital polisher and a small head, using the automotive paint wire brush, and then work down with various sandpapers. Then clean with harsh detergents and finally nuke it in as high heat a grill as you can, outside, away from wildlife. Finally, repeat.

Aug 21, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

your recommendations for Laguna Beach?

2nd, 3rd, and 4th Alessa cucina :) their mini ravioli is awesome. I don't like how loud it is. There's also a place called Zuni or Zovs or something just south near Nyes, but I forget the exact name.

Up the PCH north about 15-20 minutes, you have:
- Javier's, Ho Sum Bistro, Pizerria Mozza, Mama D's, crow burger, crow bar, bear flag fish, santa monica seafood...
- you can go south about 10 minutes to crown valley and PCH for Tutta Bella or Salt Creek Grill.
- in downtown LB, I personally love Taco Mesa.

There's a place in LB that you can walk into and eat dinner with the ocean view, I forget what it's called - the view is spectacular, the food is pretty bad and way overpriced; avoid it if you want good food, but if all you care about is enjoying the view, this is good.

Aug 12, 2012
jedovaty in Los Angeles Area

Immersion blenders

The manual for mine (purchased last year), says not to run it longer than 5 minutes, or break if it gets warm.

Aug 02, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

Instant Read Digital Thermometer used on Americas Test Kitchen

Since I do a lot of tinkering, I bought a digital multi-meter which also reads temperature. I put together my own probe k-type thermocouple at omega, stainless steel shaft.

Aug 02, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

The Best Deal You Ever Found?

I gave up trying to get deals. I used to try, and the hours, days, weeks, spent searching, waiting, driving, calling combined with the frustrations associated in negotiations has led me to start taking pride in paying retail price. I'm starting a movement where people who pay full price are no longer shunned. If I can afford, and I want it, and it meets a price I'm willing to pay, then I will buy it. Why can't I brag about that? Life is full of people who brag about what a low price or deal they got, but why is it so bad to brag, yes, I bought that, full price, baby!? *smug*

:D

Jul 31, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

got a jet engine to wok, now what?

I'm pretty sure it's for propane. It came with tubing and regulator that reverse-thread screwed right into my tank. The pilot is like a jet... it would be nice to get it working, so I could turn heat source on and off while cooking to save my arms a bit...

I can take a picture later if needed.

Jul 24, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

got a jet engine to wok, now what?

I used grapeseed oil, and I used very little. I think the fact that he dumped about a cup of oil in (vs my tablespoon or so) probably has something to do with it, as well as the temp of the wok was lower having just been washed with water - this later part is harder to gauge, we don't know the temp of the washing water. Mine was bare metal on highest burner setting for 30s with a tiny amount of oil. That makes sense.

It's all talk, anyway, after that fire, I'm not jumping out of my skin to try it again.

Jul 24, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

got a jet engine to wok, now what?

Oooo i found this - I could do it, too if I need to reseason:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGXGJD...

The question I have: how come the oil didn't spontaneously combust when he put it in like it did in mine? Quantity? His wasn't to heat yet after washing it with water?

Jul 24, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

Can I save my wok after a grease fire?

The volume part makes sense.

But who on earth would want only two chicken wings? :D That sounds like super-model food, perhaps served with half an almond and a couple chiffonades of butter-leaf lettuce!

Jul 24, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

Can I save my wok after a grease fire?

I have never deep fried anything. That said, I'm having trouble conceptualizing how the wok is better for deep frying -- with the rounded sides converging, when you initially put stuff in it'll fall and crowd at the bottom, despite eventually floating up to where there's more surface area. Wouldn't a straight-sided pot with medium height side, like a dutch oven (cast iron, for example), be better?

The above may potentially read as if I'm being argumentative, but it is only a question from someone seeking to learn who has never deep fried! :)

*** I lie, I did try once, to make corn nuts. I used my 8qt stock pot filled with about 2" oil, and the oil exploded up when I dropped the hominy in, which I thought was dry but there was a lot more internal moisture than I realized. Ooops. Whata mess.

Jul 24, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

Can I save my wok after a grease fire?

Hi there:

I see the OP occured in Feburary 2012, so it was a few months ago and he/she has probably cleaned up the wok by now. For benefit of those searching:

This happened to me just last week, see here:
http://tinyurl.com/72oay4h [[goes to smugmug]

]

I was woking first time with a very high output burner, which was on for about 30 seconds, and I put grape-seed oil in, and poof, smoke->fire.

My wok was well seasoned, and when I put the fire out, there was a nasty sludge. I got it out by waiting for things to cool, then turning on the burner (not full power, something more manegable), waiting for smoke to show up, then pouring water in from a kettle and using my brush to scrub it. Took only about 10 seconds and it was done. I don't recommend doing it this way in retrospect, very dangerous.

I read this thread, and have the following suggestions/comments, even if the OP and I have somewhat different setups:
- if the OP used a high-smoke-point oil, it's clear he/she has a fairly strong stove, if oil was poured in and eventually ignited. I never got that to happen on my stove in the kitchen. With this strong stove, one could stir fry so long as portions are managed.
- if low smoke point oil, then we can't really make conclusions?

To clean sludge out on the home stove, I'd recommend having a bristle brush on the side (I got one made out of bamboo for $3 at the local restaurant supply; see attached). Get some water boiling. Heat up the wok, SLOWLY, on a low to medium heat, until it starts getting hot but not smoking. Pour water in and scrub.

Don't heat on high or get to smoking, as others have said, it may heat up. You use boiling water to help drop the temp difference between the wok and the water to help minimize any potential for warping, and to help release the sludge. I used cold water on mine above because I don't care if mine warps a bit, so long as it sits on the stove. In retrospect, that was very stupid, perhaps there's a chance the metal would crack and drop the sludge onto the burner and envelope everything/one in flames. I had a fire extinguisher on hand.

If you want to be safe, don't even heat up the wok, just pour boiling water into it.

Jul 24, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

got a jet engine to wok, now what?

CK linked to this video:
http://youtu.be/ehgnv3lNg5E

I've watched that video several times while researching wok cooking over the past months, and holy cow that guy uses a lot of oil to begin with relative to my own cooking. Even after he drains it out. Is one supposed to use that much with such a high powered burner?

Another interesting point: you can see him turning the heat on and off through the process. Coool.

Jul 19, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

got a jet engine to wok, now what?

Excellent link, thank you!

I definitely want to try noodles and rice, but need to get my wok seasoned properly again. Shouldn't take long with this new burner :)

Jul 18, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

got a jet engine to wok, now what?

No. I want to be like batman.

Jul 18, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

got a jet engine to wok, now what?

Yes, that's how I had been doing it for the past couple months. The trouble: sweet spot not only caused too much smoke, only allowed about 1/2 portion at a time. And there was the racket with the ring banging against my stove. The high heat output of this afterburner let's me do larger portions, and also truly get all that liquid out.

Before any of this, I had borrowed one of those very heavy "viking" woks from my parental unit. The results, while not stir fry like this, were still tasty; I would get the excessive juices and braising/steaming, and use those to my advantage. I returned it because I couldn't tell whether the item was non-stick, which I've been slowly moving away from.

I want to install one of these on the back of my car.

Jul 18, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

got a jet engine to wok, now what?

As long as they make the cool afterburner sound, I'm game :D That's the best part about this whole experience!

Jul 17, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

got a jet engine to wok, now what?

All righty, attempt #2 showed a lot of progress, and the meal was considerably better today (gf was pleasantly surprised)! Very encouraging!

I began with a lower heat, and built up as I added ingredients, and didn't both removing any. This seemed to work very well, nothing burned, my veggies all came out with good textures, the protein wasn't dry but done and moist (wasn't quite as good as last time, continue reading). I made two mistakes:
1. didn't start hot enough, so when I added protein, I didn't get that sudden, immediate sear which gives great flavor
2. I had vinegar and lime in my sauce which pretty much killed the wok's seasoning on contact when added at the end, so right as I started the final tossing, everything began to stick. I grabbed the spatoola, and finished with that instead. Duuuhhh.. I know better!

Bummed about the seasoning, as it was pretty cool -- everything was flipping and flying out and back into the pan without sticking (and I used minimal oil). Barely had to use the flipper flapper thing.

As I moved through the veggies and increased the heat, lots of the ingredients' water basically vaporized on contact with the pan. Now I get the point of the high heat - very different from my past "stir fry", things would braise a bit in their own juices.

Removing the wok from the burner proved quicker to control heat than reducing the burner, possibly due to the chilly evening.

Final note: I'm not sure I like my specific wok from an ergonomic standpoint. The handle is short, gets hot, and my hands fatigued quickly from holding it. Or maybe it's the height of the stove on my bbq, like CK suggested.. gotta work out a better way to do this!

Jul 17, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

got a jet engine to wok, now what?

Interesting. I'll give it a try from part of 3 through, errr... well, maybe once I'll try through 10. I don't like cornstarchy/potatostarchy/yamstarchy sauces; I'm not after authentic :)

Jul 17, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

got a jet engine to wok, now what?

Here's a video my gf caught when I tried to put the grapeseed oil in:
http://tinyurl.com/72oay4h

See how dangerous?

((begin scotty impersonation)) Cannot handle that much power, captain! ((end impersonation))

Jul 15, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

got a jet engine to wok, now what?

I really wouldn't recommend it - way too powerful and dangerous. Only reason would be huge portions, lots of people, you need to boil gallons of water or oil very very quickly, or you can't afford an extra $20 to purchase a safer, lower BTU commercial wok burner.

In my first attempt, I had the burner near max, oil smoked and turned to fire almost immediately upon pouring into the wok.

Admittedly, it is helluva fun. :D

Jul 15, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

got a jet engine to wok, now what?

Ah, yes, it's the spatula that I have. I have seen that ladle in the restaurant supply store, just don't know how it would be used? I've seen it in videos, but it looks rather cumbersome, though would be useful is using liquids or rice-dishes. I just dump stuff out on a plate. What I need is a cover in case I get flames again.

My family is not Chinese or any other type of Asian, so it's unlikely they know what Chinese cooking is all about :) I was trying to reproduce some restaurant dishes at home, and the very small portions and high smoke gave me the desire to go for a bigger burner and outside. I actually wanted a different burner, but this was very cheap and immediately available so impulse purchase worked out. Now to learn how to tame it...!

Jul 15, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware

got a jet engine to wok, now what?

Here you go. Sid wrote it's a pilot light, I guess that makes sense.

I just can't get the thing to light, even when slightly cracked open, the stream is way too fast and blows the flame out.

Jul 15, 2012
jedovaty in Cookware