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How much should $1000 worth of groceries last a family of 4, 2 adults and 2 teens that eat like adults? Please help!

It was developed by Rudolf Steiner (the guy responsible for Waldorf schools).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biodynam...

Oct 27, 2014
wapfcat in General Topics

What food do you wash that you're sure no one else does?

Most eggs come pre-washed. You can tell if they're not pre-washed because they have poop and feathers on them, so it's kinda obvious.

Aug 13, 2014
wapfcat in General Topics
1

Simple Way to Flavor Brown Rice

There's always furikake... I haven't tried it yet with brown rice, but I really want to.

Jul 24, 2014
wapfcat in Home Cooking

Points to Ponder

There's a really big difference between current "GMO techniques" and hybridization... Unless you know of a way to breed corn until round-up grows/appears/whatever inside of it, that is.

May 25, 2014
wapfcat in General Topics

Ground Beef: Are my taste buds getting too old, or does Ground Beef have little taste compared to apprx 20 years ago?

May 20, 2014
wapfcat in General Topics

What's your summer guilty pleasure?

You're very wise!

May 20, 2014
wapfcat in General Topics

What's your summer guilty pleasure?

Totally unnecessary. Sourdough is really good for you (and even white sourdough has less of an impact on your blood sugar than whole wheat yeast bread), and homemade mayo is even healthier -- all those excellent egg yolks and good oil (so don't use vegetable oil).

May 20, 2014
wapfcat in General Topics

Lactose Intolerance

Wow... Did you read the post? That wasn't what the OP asked at all.

The question was regarding whether or not heat breaks down the LACTASE enzyme added to the milk. Lactase is an enzyme that breaks down lactose. (The presence of lactase in raw milk is why most people with lactose intolerance can enjoy raw milk because the pasteurization process hasn't destroyed it.)

May 07, 2014
wapfcat in Special Diets

Using the convection feature for baking

My parents got a convection oven when I was in 3rd grade. We figured out the rules for ourselves and this is what worked.

A lot depended on cooking time. For cookies, we use the written temperature but reduce the baking time by a minute or two. For pretty much anything else, if it bakes for close to an hour or more, we lower the temperature by five degrees and reduce the time by about 10 minutes or so.

For the first time in adulthood, I have a convection oven now (for about a year), and I still follow those rules, and everything comes out perfectly. (I actually have to adjust because the thing insists on automatically reducing the temperature by 25ยบ, which is extremely annoying.)

NB: My husband, however, uses the regular bake function for his bread baking as it works better.

Apr 09, 2014
wapfcat in Home Cooking

Eating pizza or burger w/ knife and fork

No kidding. My parents are both European (came to the US from separate countries in early adulthood) and they raised my brother and me to eat pizza with fork and knife. I do eat my pizza by hand sometimes, but more often than not it's with a knife and fork, and I've never cared what people thought about it. It's the way I was raised and I like it. If someone has a problem with it, well, then, that's their problem; not mine.

Apr 05, 2014
wapfcat in Not About Food

Aussies reporting back

It's next to impossible to find good fish and chips in the States. No one makes 'em as good as the Aussies. Not even the British. There are respectable attempts, but nothing comes close.

Oct 17, 2013
wapfcat in Manhattan

When is kimchee too funky?

It's fermented, isn't it? Fermented stuff should last at least a year in the fridge...

ETA: I mean, if it's pasteurized then the bets are probably off, but if it's homemade and raw, then it should last ages.

Oct 10, 2013
wapfcat in Home Cooking

Am I the only one who doesn't like...?

There's a lot of bananas I don't like. Dole ones are awful - dry. Our Co-Op sells some nice organic ones that I like, though. My mom buys Dole organic bananas and I still don't like them.

Speaking of bananas, though -- I can't stand banana pudding. It's the most disgusting use of banana flavour ever. Ditto for banana cream pie.

Oct 10, 2013
wapfcat in General Topics

Am I the only one who doesn't like...?

I definitely prefer raw milk. My husband and I had a glass of pasteurized milk a few days ago, and it was awful, nasty, horrible. Tasted dead.

Oct 10, 2013
wapfcat in General Topics

Dehydrator ideas?

So far I have used mine to dehydrate sprouted grains and nuts. I sprout einkorn flour for a couple of days and then dry the berries over night (or 7 hours). I did the same with almonds.

Oct 04, 2013
wapfcat in Home Cooking

Alternatives to cream cheese? Counting fat calories.

Why are you defining healthy as low-fat? You do realise that some of the most important vitamins are fat-soluble, don't you?

Most important of all is whether the cream cheese was made from milk from pastured cows or not. Animal products made from pastured animals are incredibly healthy -- loaded with good fats and fat-soluble vitamins and CLA.

Sep 12, 2013
wapfcat in General Topics
1

Coconut oil yes or never mind

No, it's not. Refined coconut oil is, for one, totally a thing. It has a much higher smoke point than unrefined coconut oil, and it has no coconut flavour or smell.

Sep 12, 2013
wapfcat in Home Cooking
1

Do you use a crock-pot / slow cooker?

My husband is the stock maker in the family just because I don't like dealing with the meat and bones and carcasses. He even bought chicken feet for the purpose. (I only make the broth when he's sick or can't for another reason.)

We usually make chicken stock just because that's what we have the most of on hand, though we're slowly saving up beef bones and pork bones. We don't season ours at all during cooking because we use it for a variety of things.

He just puts the chicken backs/carcass/miscellaneous bones in the crock pot, covers them with water, and adds a splash of apple cider vinegar. Then he lets it sit for an hour. The vinegar works to start softening the bones a bit. Then he turns it on low. If he turns it on during the day, he'll skim the bits off the top once it starts to bubble a bit, but it turns out just fine even if he doesn't do that. Then he just lets it sit for 18-24 hours (no longer than 24 hours), strains out the meat, and there's the stock. Super easy.

We have found that the most important part of making good stock is having really good chicken. We used to buy chicken from Whole Foods and the stock it made was not the greatest. Not bad, but not amazing, either. Now we buy our chickens from a local farmer who pastures the chickens, and they make AMAZING stock. It's so good.

Aug 20, 2013
wapfcat in Cookware

Great Lakes Gelatin

I buy it directly from the manufacturer. It's considerably cheaper than buying it from Amazon and I get to cut out the middleman, which I prefer to do as often as possible when it comes to food.

Aug 10, 2013
wapfcat in Manhattan

I'm not a "guy"!

Actually, they originally called Capt. Gates "ma'am", but she corrected them and insisted on "sir". I always find that sort of thing ridiculous and can't really take women seriously who insist on it. They are not men; they are women. Sheesh.

Aug 08, 2013
wapfcat in Not About Food

Pickles---why?

A properly fermented vegetable -- including pickles -- is extremely healthy for your gut flora. Furthermore, fermenting vegetables breaks down the parts that are hard to digest while preserving the nutrients (see: cruciferous vegetables). A fermented vegetable is actually going to end up healthier than a plain raw one.

At this point, we just buy Bubbie's pickles because they're unpasteurized, so all the good stuff is still available. We like them with lunch. I had to learn to like them a bit -- generally, I only like German pickles as they're spiced differently, but these are pretty good. My husband just generally loves pickles, though, so he liked them right off the bat.

Our lunches are usually pretty simple -- meat, cheese, bread and butter, and fermented veggies of the week. Sometimes pickles, sometimes sauerkraut, sometimes kimchi.

Jul 17, 2013
wapfcat in General Topics

How Many Eggs is Too Many?

I would look up the work of Chris Masterjohn on cholesterol. Cholesterol is essential to your health -- it is, in point of fact, how the body repairs itself and how the body produces hormones. The problem is not from high cholesterol, but from oxidized cholesterol, and eggs, especially good quality eggs, are not going to oxidize your cholesterol. Skim milk, on the other hand, is loaded with oxidized cholesterol. Eat your eggs in peace.

Jun 03, 2013
wapfcat in General Topics

How Many Eggs is Too Many?

The eggs from pastured chickens do indeed have a different nutritional profile than eggs from factory farm chickens. We buy ours from the farmer every week. There is a significant taste difference between those and factory eggs.

Jun 03, 2013
wapfcat in General Topics

Ordering 'Bottle Water' in restaurants?! - Please watch this and say 'NO'!!

The little bottled water that I've seen stating that it's from a municipal source is also listed as filtered through a reverse osmosis filter, so, at the very least it will not only taste better but it won't be chlorinated or fluoridated. I only drink water at a restaurant if it's not chlorinated.

May 15, 2013
wapfcat in Food Media & News

Beef Prices are at an All Time High and Rising Through 2014....Will It Affect Your Purchases or Consumption?

I only buy my beef from one farmer, and he hasn't raised prices (yet?). Pastured beef isn't exactly affected by rising corn prices, though.

Until we get a chest freezer sorted out, we stick with the cheap cuts and mainly ground beef. I spend $5.50/lb and buy two pounds once or twice a month (give or take a few ounces -- we buy direct from the farmer, never the grocery store, and not every pack of meat is identical; the price is listed as per pound, but really it's per pack and they give discounts when you buy more than a pound at a time -- it's cheaper by more than a dollar per pound than at the grocery store). Lately we've mainly been making burgers with it, but in winter we use it in dishes that easily last us 3-4 nights, which brings the price per serving down considerably. There's too many precious nutrients in pastured beef to give it up entirely, and we actually eat more beef than we did three years ago or even a year ago.

May 15, 2013
wapfcat in Food Media & News

Low salt diet may not be so beneficial

That's not super wrong. I don't know about cooking them for "a long time", but there are certainly antinutrients in vegetables that prevent the proper absorption and digestion of their nutrients, plus all the cellulose, which we can't digest, both of those are broken down in cooking to make them more digestible and useful. And serving them with fat (or cream sauce in this case) DOES make them more healthy, because without fat, your body won't absorb those all important fat soluble vitamins (A, D, and K). That said, even though nothing beats the nutrient density of meat and animal fats, I'd never say we don't need to eat vegetables; they're also very useful for aiding the liver in detoxing and all that jazz.

May 15, 2013
wapfcat in Food Media & News

How do you eat your avocados?

Our local co-op has an excellent chili powder (salt-less) in their bulk section that we've been sprinkling on our avocados along with some Redmond Real Salt. In the past I've made milkshakes out of them with milk (obviously) and sweetened condensed milk (these days I'd make my own sweetened condensed milk, or, more likely, use honey). When I'm sick with a fever and a sore throat, avocados mashed up with honey are really beautiful.

Apr 04, 2013
wapfcat in Home Cooking

Soy Milk vs. Rice Milk vs. Almond Milk vs. Skim Milk vs. ???

If you want to eat healthier, ditch the cereal. It's a highly processed food that your body just turns into sugar.

The best milk is whole raw milk. Raw milk is pretty well tolerated even by people who can't do lactose because the enzymes that break down the lactose are still intact. Plus, pasteurization changes the form of the lactic acid in milk so that it is broken down into sugar much more quickly than that found in raw milk, so it keeps you satisfied much longer. It's also got all those handy enzymes still intact. Raw milk is safer to eat than spinach (since the CDC started keeping data, no one has died from consuming raw milk... a bunch of people have died from eating spinach -- the good bacteria in raw milk are strong enough that they actually destroy pathogens quite quickly, unless they are so overloaded that the pathogens win, as is what happens in milk destined for pasteurization, which also happens to be full of nasties like pus.). And you know why they have to add vitamins to milk? 'Cuz pasteurization destroys the ones that were already there.

Skim milk was fed to pigs to fatten them up. Now they feed it to humans with the lie that it's healthy. There are numerous studies demonstrating that people lose more weight when they drink whole milk than when they drink skim milk.

Soy milk is chock full of phytoestrogens. Monks used to consume soy to kill their libidos. The only soy that should be consumed is fermented soy (natto, miso). Plus it's a major GMO crop and there is not a single long term study demonstrating that GMOs are safe. By the third generation, rats are infertile.

Store bought almond milk is full of additives and almost always made from unsoaked almonds. Almonds are high in phytic acid which is a nasty antinutrient that prevents your body from digesting your food properly and absorbing the nutrients in it. You can make your own almond milk from soaked almonds and it'll be loads healthier, but almonds are still seeds and do not have a favourable ratio of Omega 6s and Omega 3s. (Macadamias are the best in that regard.)

Coconut milk is very good. You can make your own for cheaper than it comes in the cans, too (plus you get to avoid the BPA and BPS).

Quit counting calories. That puts the focus on all the wrong things, plus it turns people into fatphobes, and fat is essential to health. Eat a variety of whole, real foods and cook what needs to be cooked to deactivate all the antinutrients that run around in some raw foods.

Mar 28, 2013
wapfcat in General Topics

Is commercial almond milk really healthy?

Almonds are high in phytic acid - an antinutrient that prevents the proper breakdown and digestion of our food. Phytic acid is deactivated through soaking. There might, somewhere, be a company that sells almond milk from soaked almonds, but you're better off making your own.

Plus, as you say, there's all the additives. And supplemental vitamins are generally going to be artificial vitamins that your body can't use as effectively anyways.

Mar 28, 2013
wapfcat in General Topics

When are they gonna start labelling genetically modified foods

And yet food manufacturers change their labels all the time. They're required to list allergens. They can label the GMOs. Not that difficult. And yes - I want to know if a cow ate GMO corn, or if the chicken providing my eggs ate any GMOs, or the pig providing my bacon and pork, etc., etc., etc. Thankfully, I buy most of my meat straight from the farmer, so I actually can know these things.

Mar 14, 2013
wapfcat in General Topics