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seattle_lee's Profile

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Why are kitchen tools so expensive?

Have *you* looked at Tojiro DP?

What's Best for Cutting Pizza?

Yeah, sharpening a wheel cutter sounds like *vastly* more work than sharpening a knife. As does a trip to the store to buy a new one.

But then I've had a lot of practice sharpening my knives, and I have knives with incredible edge retention.

Sep 09, 2014
seattle_lee in Cookware
1

What's Best for Cutting Pizza?

That's not exactly what I had in mind, but pretty close. And it's a brand with a good rep for inexpensive knives. It'll also be useful for far more than just cutting pizza.

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/cckclea... is the form factor I was thinking of.

My actual knive is a Sugimoto No 6 OMS, but that's a lot more expensive. It's also my primary kitchen knife, and I can't imagine paying that kind of change for something that would have limited utility. Fantastic knife, though.

Sep 05, 2014
seattle_lee in Cookware

What's Best for Cutting Pizza?

I use a chinese chefs knife (aka 'cleaver'). Works great.

Sep 04, 2014
seattle_lee in Cookware

What is the best way to freeze mushrooms?

Dry the porcini, make duxelles with the others. To dry the porcini, slice them and then put in the oven at 170 with the door cracked open.

Aug 28, 2014
seattle_lee in Home Cooking

Seattle Spanish Staying Power?

I agree, Txori was a great spot and we miss it. Sadly never got to try Aragona.

Aug 28, 2014
seattle_lee in Greater Seattle

Best pots/pans?

Not a fan of sets -- you want different materials & design for different pieces.

For my money, nothing comes close to carbon steel for skillets and crepe pans. Mine are all de Buyer, but a friend has some older Paterno that's pretty good too. Having a single stainless saute pan or skillet is good for acidic foods. I think Sitram is best value, Demeyere is just best (and worth it if you are only buying one).

For pasta / stock pot, cheap stainless with a heavy disk bottom is good, so long as there's a lot of liquid in the pot. I also have an enameled dutch oven for when I'm making a stew not a soup. Mine is Staub, picked up on craigslist.

Saucepans good to have in stainless clad -- I like Sitram Catering.

I've owned a number of all-clad pans, and still own some. Every one was not worth the price I paid, IMO. Not that they can't be worthwhile if you find them at the right price. But with what I know now, they are no longer on my shopping list.

Aug 18, 2014
seattle_lee in Cookware

Chocolate cake south of downtown?

We ended up with one of the guests baking a cake, so we didn't buy one. But I've got to say that Cakes of Paradise looks very interesting.

Columbia City would have been my normal first choice, but I've never been moved by their cakes. Pastries and breads, yes. Just not the cakes.

Aug 18, 2014
seattle_lee in Greater Seattle

Chocolate cake south of downtown?

Where can I get a great chocolate cake, preferably south of downtown? It's for a birthday, but decoration is not needed.

Aug 14, 2014
seattle_lee in Greater Seattle

Why all the hate still for Dupont Teflon?

I too just flat out prefer cast iron out especially carbon steel. Nonstick just doesn't brown properly, and carbon pans are just so easy to clean

Jul 30, 2014
seattle_lee in Cookware

B'ham fam doing SEA for a day - looking for casual ethnic (probably) dinner

Sichuan Cuisine at 12th and jackson

Jul 16, 2014
seattle_lee in Greater Seattle

Our de buyer Carbon Steel Cookware Experience

Here are my two cents -- now that I have owned these pans for a good 2-3 years, I just can't imagine doing without them. Mine are Carbone Plus. Never had any difficulty with seasoning, very much nonstick, easy to clean. And cheap, too. What's not to love? I don't rate them as highly as the couple of Demeyere that I own, but I honestly reach for them more often.

Jul 15, 2014
seattle_lee in Cookware
1

Need help with my 1st sushi knife

If you are going to go with the yanagi, you should probably know about www.kitchenknifeforums.com. Also Jon Brioda's video here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kA0vd... (his other sharpening videos are pretty good too).

Jul 13, 2014
seattle_lee in Cookware

Need help with my 1st sushi knife

Good advice from chem and cowboy. If you go the yanagi route, there are several japanese sellers on ebay that give good value. Both Yoshihiro and Tojiro are reputable brands, and make affordable yanagi available on ebay. These might be a good way to get your feet wet with the use and sharpening of a yanagi, and see if it is good for you. I have a yanagi from Shimatani that I bought on ebay, and it is a nice knife, but I don't see it listed at present.

Jul 12, 2014
seattle_lee in Cookware

Seattle near Safeco Field

What do you consider walking distance?

In addition to seconding Il corvo and salumi, I would also recommend Maneki, Tsukushinbo, Tamarind Tree, Sichuan Cuisine, and Hing Loon.

May 14, 2014
seattle_lee in Greater Seattle

Tough Lamb?

I'd do a slow braise with the leftovers. Like others have said, this seems more like mutton than lamb. 7 lbs for a boneless leg is pretty huge for lamb

Apr 24, 2014
seattle_lee in Home Cooking

All-Clad 12 Inch skillet alternatives?

I'd get a carbon steel pan. Everyone else seems to be suggesting stainless, but I don't see anything in your requirements that points to stainless.

I have had great experiences with my de Buyer Carbone Plus pans, but tthere are other good options for carbon pans.

Apr 09, 2014
seattle_lee in Cookware

A New Orleans native visits Seattle for the first time

I second the recs for Spur and Salumi and Altura.

For vietnamese, try Long Provincial.

Apr 08, 2014
seattle_lee in Greater Seattle

What's new in your kitchen?

You could spend a whole lot more money on pans that de Buyer. Carbone Plus is just as good as Mineral B, IMO, and a bit cheaper,, but it's not like Mineral B is even in the same price range as Demeyere.

Mar 27, 2014
seattle_lee in Cookware

What's the most unique food experience in Seattle?

Poppy and Revel would be my 2 choices.

Feb 11, 2014
seattle_lee in Greater Seattle

Food, Beer, Wine - Seattle Favs

Vif is a great wine & coffee spot, catering to a more old world palate than many of the local wineries.

For beer, I like Chuck's Hop Shop, The Beer Junction, Schooner Exact, Epic Ales, and Elysian.

Feb 02, 2014
seattle_lee in Greater Seattle

Need low(ish) budget menu for great wine

If you have an Asian market nearby, they often have while duck at about 2.50 a pound. Simple roast duck matches many red wines

Jan 31, 2014
seattle_lee in Home Cooking

Best Value-to-Price Ratio in Seattle?

Gorditos is still good, as of my last trip, maybe a year and a half ago

Jan 23, 2014
seattle_lee in Greater Seattle

Best Value-to-Price Ratio in Seattle?

For food, I'll go with Tamarind Tree. Such good food, and good service. Lots of really interesting things on the menu, never boring. Much of it is by the book, but there are seasonal specialties too. Only downside is that the fish can be overcooked sometimes.

For drink, I'll go with a $10 growler of Epic Ale's "Solar Trans-Amplifier." The Epic beers are hit or miss for me, but this one has been a big, big hit in both of two renditions.

Jan 15, 2014
seattle_lee in Greater Seattle

Shun Sora Knives: Your thought?

Heh. I have a 270mm suji I never use. Was just thinking of selling it. I used it very rarely before I got my yanagi and my 270 gyuto. I have literally never used it since.

Jan 15, 2014
seattle_lee in Cookware

Shun Sora Knives: Your thought?

Cynic, yeah, that green onion cutting is exactly what I'm talking about as well. He's got a blade with a teeny bit of belly, or maybe none at all. You can see that with each stroke, the blade is angled down so that it makes contact with the board on the far side of the food. As the knife moves down, it's angle changes, so that the point(s) of contact go all the way through the food from front to back. Do you see that angle change? Do my earlier comments about the angles make more sense now?

Though Chem's comment above makes me see a new way to use the knife -- the 2 straight lines are for 2 different purposes. It makes sense that you might want to do that, but that's not how I'd choose to use the knife. Because when I want a short, straight level area of the knife to chop a less wide bit of food, I generally reach for my chinese chefs knife (aka cleaver).

Jan 15, 2014
seattle_lee in Cookware

Shun Sora Knives: Your thought?

The geometry in that image looks nothing like the picture at Amazon. Look at the tip; completely different. Other sites (including the Shun site) show a geometry that looks rather more like the Amazon one.

Jan 14, 2014
seattle_lee in Cookware

Shun Sora Knives: Your thought?

Look at how he cuts the cabbage in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2M8wP...

You'll see that the knife contacts the board at the front of the cabbage, then as he follows through with the cut, the point of contact moves smoothly back along the knife to where the knife exits the cabbage. That's what I'm talking about. Looking at the video, I see that it's probably not as large an angle as the 20 degrees I was talking about. But it's definitely not a flat chop.

And when he's cutting shorter food and using less of the blade length, the cut is much closer to straight up and down. Which seems natural to me.

My Suisin 210 was my christmas present to myself. Love it so far, but haven't done a ton of cooking with it. Startlingly light, and I'm just getting used to that -- but I think that I will love it once I adjust. Haven't sharpened it yet.

Jan 14, 2014
seattle_lee in Cookware

Shun Sora Knives: Your thought?

This is a collected response to cynic, chem, & cowboy:

I agree that the knife looks like two straight blades joined with an angle. I think that is the problem with the knife. Most other gyutos have a slow, gentle angle, which is great for push cutting: you move your hand smoothly down and forward, and the knife angle changes as you do so, making contact with the board all the way through the motion. Because the knife is moving both forward and in angle, you use a rather longer knife than the width of the food you are cutting. You start the motion with the knife at maybe 20 degrees to the cutting surface, and decrease from there. And at that 20 degrees, you are making contact with the board maybe an inch or inch and half behind the tip of the knife, and the point of contact smoothly moves back along the knife as you cut. With the Sora, you would have to start your motion with the knife at 30 or more degrees to get the same range of motion. That means holding your arm very high and having your wrist at an awkward angle. Additionally, you will not have a smooth forward-and-down movement of the blade, because the curvature is not smooth. It's this last bit that I think will be most awkward if you want to use the full blade.

With this motion, you can definitely use the entire length of the blade, even if the blade is not straight. Or, well, most of the blade length -- it would be quite awkward to actually use it *all*.

We'll have to agree to disagree that the Sora's belly isn't significantly larger than other gyutos. Sure, its not as curved as the Shun Classic, but happliy there are other gyutos in the marketplace. I could be completely wrong on this; I'm just judging off of the pictures. It is possible that there is a bit of the illusion effect that cowboyardee mentions. But the unevenness of the curvature is pretty obvious.

As for my knife usage -- I typically use a gyuto for push cutting. I own or have owned Tojiro DP, Hiromoto AS, CarboNext, Devin Thomas, Suisin Inox Honyaki. I often will push cut through a halved cabbage for soup, or a large pile of quartered carrots or halved celery. With a 4" wide pile of product, I typically need the full range of a 210mm gyuto to achieve clean separation of product; maybe I just use more forward motion in my push cut than some of you do. Or maybe I just cut larger amounts of food at one cut. I use a 210mm blade unless I need the extra length, and I find that I use 240mm about half the time and 270mm very rarely.

For straight up and down chopping, I use my chinese cleaver.

As for knife length and pricing -- the comparison that I had in mind was the 8" Sora vs another maker's 180mm gyuto. But if we start to talk Santoku, which does make sense, all of the sources that I use show santokus, either 165 or 180, to be noticably cheaper than 210mm gyutos. But Shun and marketing set price points are foreign concepts to any place I would consider buying a knife.

Jan 14, 2014
seattle_lee in Cookware

How Do I Get My Girlfriend Away From Teflon Nonstick Pans?

Buy yourself a carbon steel pan and season it properly and use it when you cook. Once she sees how it works, she'll be converted.

Jan 14, 2014
seattle_lee in Cookware