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French Copper Pots = lined with TIN or STEEL?

Actually, silver is in certain food ingredients. Many of us sport silver cavity fillings. Silver is prevalent in the decorative dessert genre of cooking. It's not banned.

May 02, 2013
AuntieMame58 in Cookware

French Copper Pots = lined with TIN or STEEL?

very cool link from Rocky Mountain re-tinning...

May 02, 2013
AuntieMame58 in Cookware

French Copper Pots = lined with TIN or STEEL?

The instance of silver affecting the skin is EXTREMELY rare - This was documented in the seminal Dartmouth study on metals. It's far more dangerous to your health to cook with teflon, or with high amounts of salt or sugar. Most prescriptions we take have more risks that you can shake a stick at. Moreover, it is not banned by the FDA, the way copper is required (other than for jam basins and sugar pots) to line copper cookware. Even copper is not fatal if your tin lining has worn unless you are cooking virtually every day in it. Then, the issue is there is too much copper intake for the body on a regular basis. A lot of folks think it's super dangerous - toxic - but only if used regularly. As I read all the posts to this blog, it's important to recognize that everyone's preferences vary with regard to what what they cook with. And in the end, that's basically what it comes down to. I think silver and tin are the best way to go, but others obviously feel differently, which is fine by me. Happy Cooking!

May 02, 2013
AuntieMame58 in Cookware

French Copper Pots = lined with TIN or STEEL?

Stainless steel linings are the advent of the "convenience" market and do not provide superior cooking results. Tin and silver are the best linings for copper cookware.

May 02, 2013
AuntieMame58 in Cookware

French Copper Pots = lined with TIN or STEEL?

There is a small, artisanal atelier in Villedieu les Poeles, France that still handcrafts copper cookware, uses cast iron handles and lines the pots with silver. It's a bit more expensive than Mauviel's tin and stainless steel lined pots, but so worth it. Silver is the best conductor of heat, and it's perfectly married with copper for the most wonderful, consistent cooking results.

May 02, 2013
AuntieMame58 in Cookware

French Copper Pots = lined with TIN or STEEL?

Great! Happy Thanksgiving to all. Signing off. Auntie Mame

Nov 20, 2012
AuntieMame58 in Cookware

French Copper Pots = lined with TIN or STEEL?

Will all those who are professionally blogging for a cookware company in this thread kindly identify themselves as that? The pattern suggests more than obsessiveness and passion, although foodies are know for this! This would be helpful. For me, I'm a copper cookware zealot. That's all.

Nov 20, 2012
AuntieMame58 in Cookware

French Copper Pots = lined with TIN or STEEL?

I started with water too. I noticed a different roiling pattern with different pots. The real essence of performance lies in cooking with food, how the food is transformed by the cooking process. I am so eager to hear about this from the Food Scientist's perspective, as there are so many different points of view in the blogosphere. Of course, my personal favorite is copper lined with silver, which one can get in France and in Italy. That's the Maserati or Rolls Royce of it all, but I have only 2 pots. One fry pan and one saucepan. They're amazing and make cooking in anything else somewhat frustrating, depending on what I'm trying to do.

Nov 20, 2012
AuntieMame58 in Cookware

French Copper Pots = lined with TIN or STEEL?

We will have to agree to disagree, but I admire your passion. We can agree that there are many ways to look at this, but the proper way to assert a test is by cooking in the same size vessels, on the same size burners, with the same kind of food prepared regularly. You seem to have a lot invested in this. Perhaps you're in the business. Either way, we will agree to disagree and continue this stimulating discussion once a qualified Food Scientist weighs in. Meanwhile, Happy Cooking and Happy Thanksgiving!

Nov 20, 2012
AuntieMame58 in Cookware

French Copper Pots = lined with TIN or STEEL?

That's precisely what I've asked of a renowned food scientist who publishes on food science. Will post once we know more from him. Happy Thanksgiving and Happy Cooking to all! AM58

Nov 20, 2012
AuntieMame58 in Cookware

French Copper Pots = lined with TIN or STEEL?

These are all helpful articulations. All seem to agree on the main premise of my comment, which is that stainless steel lined copper pots are not great, uniform conductors of heat, and that tin is better. Having said this, with all the different information here, I am sending this to a Food Scientist to measure the heat efficacy, compare how the same food cooks in different pots and report back on it.

Nov 20, 2012
AuntieMame58 in Cookware

French Copper Pots = lined with TIN or STEEL?

The best way to explain it is this: copper heats uniformly throughout the pot. If you have a saucepan with something you're cooking, and the pot is 180 degrees at the bottom, it should be the same on the sides, at the top and in the middle if it's lined in tin or silver. It's the reason one can walk away from what they're cooking in copper on low heat and let it take care of the cooking. If you line copper pots with stainless, then the pot is 180 degrees at the bottom, but about 90 degrees at the top, in the middle and up the sides. The best, most even conductor of heat is gold, followed by silver, followed by copper. Most of the best plumbing is with copper, but not with the other two noble metals because of expense. This position is best done by scientists, mind you, such as Harold McGhee, Food Scientist of The New York Times.

Nov 19, 2012
AuntieMame58 in Cookware

Mauviel M'Cook SS worth it?

It's important to note that stainless steel linings for copper cookware are the invention of convenience, not of performance. Copper is definitely better to cook with than All-Clad, so Mauviel of Falk do a very respectable job if cooking in the tin-lined pots. Unless you're cooking at temperatures above 425F, go with tin for your money and for best performance. The majority of French chefs and cooks use copper lined with tin. Re-tining is something they're only too happy to have to do after years of use, because the performance demands a repeat performance.

Nov 19, 2012
AuntieMame58 in Cookware

French Copper Pots = lined with TIN or STEEL?

I fully agree with Copper Man that tinning is a re-trophy application for copper cookware. Unless you are cooking at temperatures above 425 degrees F, tin is superbly reliable. There are two re-tinning places on the east coast, if you need them, and there's the Brooklyn Copper Cookware company - perhaps they re-tin as well. As for stainless steel, I disagree on that front. It actually blunts the heat conductivity of copper by as much as 50%. It takes so long to cook this way. If you're going to cook in copper (and one definitely should!), then tin or silver linings are the only way to go for serious cooking performance.

Nov 19, 2012
AuntieMame58 in Cookware

French Copper Pots = lined with TIN or STEEL?

This entire string of comments is fascinating. It contains a lot of good information, and some mis-information. First, heat conductivity which is essential for cooking food evenly, efficiently and maintaining moisture. The fact is that the finest metal conductors of heat are 1) Gold, 2) Silver and 3) Copper. You should always prefer the 2.5mm copper pots to the 2mm ones, because their performance is noticingly better. While there is a lot of discussion about tin vs stainless steel, there are only a few mentions of silver. Copper pots lined with silver are considered the finest, but you hear less about them because of the expense. Silver lining is by no means an extravagance. It's like cooking with copper on steroids. It performs like a Maserati. These pots can be obtained in France. Tin is the next best lining for copper pots , but it has limitations. It melts at a 425 degree temperature, making it less suitable for high heat searing. As for cooking evenly, the beauty of copper lined with either silver or tin vs stainless steel is that they distribute heat to the food throughout the pot more evenly. You can cook on a lower temperature and literally walk away from your pot for hours. To characterize the difference, if you cook with 2.5mm copper lined with silver, the heat at the bottom of the pan is, let's say, 180 degrees. The heat at the tip of the pan, the sides of the pan and in the middle of the pan(and food) remains at 180 degrees throughout. Stainless linings are made for the convenience market, but it significantly blunts the heating properties of copper and makes for more decorative pots than it does for performance pots. With copper pots lined with stainless, the heat will be, let's say, 180 degrees on the bottom of the pot, but only 90 degrees at the top of the pot. So if you're after performance, Copper lined with silver is best, copper lined with tin is second best, and copper lined with stainless is good enough for the majority of people who cook, but not for those who cherish the cooking performance of a pot. Once you have cooked with 2.5mm copper lined with silver, I assure you, nothing else will do. But you have to be prepared to invest in these. They are pots for a lifetime and will be passed down, as the French always have, for generation and generations. For those who like beautiful pots that cook fairly well, and value convenience (care for copper and silver is more significant), then you should purchase the 2.5mm copper pot lined with stainless steel if you don't want to brave tin line pots.

Jul 25, 2012
AuntieMame58 in Cookware

Copper Cookware Thickness

Are you a Mauviel distributor or representative?

Jun 30, 2012
AuntieMame58 in Cookware

French Copper Pots = lined with TIN or STEEL?

There is so much rich information in so many of these posts. There is some additional information that may helpful. Copper pots are unrivaled cookware. There is a huge distinction between copper with tin lining vs copper with stainless lining. One of coppers many virtues is its even heat distribution. A tin or silver lining allows the copper to conduct its even heat performance best. Stainless actually blunts the conductivity of copper, although it is highly preferred by amateur cooks for its convenience. For the aficionados out there, the other beauty of copper that is lined with tin or silver is that the FOOD cooks evenly within the pan, requiring less attention and time to cook. For example, a copper pot with a stainless lining will conduct heat at the base of the pan at, say 180 degrees. But the heat at the top of the pan is cut in half, to about 90 degrees. With copper and silver, and lesser so with tin, it is the same temperature throughout the vessel, so it is 180 degrees on the bottom and 180 degrees along the sides and at the top. Without question, the finest cookware in the world is 2.5mm copper lined with silver. This is the Lamborghini of cookware. The heat output is astonishing. The cooking process is so alive and invigorating, and the food cooks in less time, at a lower flame, to ensure the moisture of the food is maintained. There is a line from France, fully hand-made, from the village that's made these pots since the 12th Century. It will be available in the States this fall. I will post again as soon as it hits our shores. The really cool thing about copper pots lined with silver is that you virtually have to learn to cook again - in a different but far more exciting way. As for the care, you will love cleaning and tending to these pots as lovingly as you do anything else that's an indispensable heirloom. The new copper and silver creams out today (Wright) make it utterly easy. And look for ones with cast iron handles, as they heat up less than bronze or brass. If you love being true to France's tradition of cooking, you will want your pots unvarnished. All that's required is that you dry them soon after washing. It's well worth it.

Jun 30, 2012
AuntieMame58 in Cookware