SWISSAIRE's Profile

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Electric VS Gas cookware options

K -

1. Both. Known as Kohle in German or Charbon in French.
2. Using a starter.
3. I don't know. I do like the taste with a coal-grilled steak.

Actually Rösle and other BBQ manufacturers do make a Kohle-fueled BBQ.But I do not have one alas.

I own a gas BBQ and a charcoal vertical rotisserie. I light twigs to start the charcoal on the latter.

Some might complain about the starter for coal, but the fumes and odor of most charcoal fluid is pretty rank too.

Oct 10, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware

Electric VS Gas cookware options

K-

That is the second photo I now have of your nice expensive oven. Wood and coal heated too.

Do you know that many of the portable BBQ's sold here in Europe are made specifically for coal ?

- R

Oct 10, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware

Pomegranate preserves?

Hi Piccola -

I realize this is a response 2 years after your original post, but I thought I might suggest something here as Pomegranates are in season again.

I found that Pomegranates alone are great for Jam or Jelly, but not much juice is pressed or recovered from the seeds.

I add 50 % orange juice from organic oranges, and the pomegranate seeds to boil. I then use a large fine stainless strainer with a pestle to juice the now-softened seeds, and to remove any orange seeds or pips. Those go into a cheesecloth bag, and returned to boil.

Once the mixture reduces, and the pectin kicks in, I add sugar, and a dash of lemon juice, and reduce it a bit further.

The colour is dark red, and the taste is excellent after 2-3 days. This makes a great gift in the coming Holidays, or a preserve to look forward to in the Winter.

Oct 09, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Home Cooking

Large tins of olive oil

Morning K-

I forgot to mention the copper item below the amphora, which is also olive oil related:

This tool is a STRIGIL, or a 2,500 year old Roman substitute soap bar, the use inherited from the Greeks.

Before soap was invented the method of cleaning the skin was to exercise (working up a sweat), rub olive oil and dirt onto the skin, and then draw the strigil like a knife blade over the skin to remove the oil.

Most were simple, shaped like a question mark (?), but many found in Roman bath excavations had a spring-key connection to be kept on large rings. Thus wealthier bathers had their own personal cleaning tools on hand whenever they chose to bathe.

Supposedly this method still works well today, but I have no such experience. Mine is only a humble replica, but there is an actual ancient Greek-inscribed strigil on sale with Ebay for a mere $ 5,000 USD.

Another use of good olive oil, although I find good olive-oil soap bars a good exfoliate and a better value.

Oct 09, 2014
SWISSAIRE in General Topics

Electric raclette maker--advice needed on purchase

Morning Goblin-

Anytime. Enjoy your new machine !

-R

Oct 08, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware

Electric raclette maker--advice needed on purchase

Morgen Goblin,

12 C and rain here early this morning.

I've seen these on German TV programs, but do not know anyone that owns one.

The 2-tray swing out option is good, but the loss of the temperature control is not. Raclette machines once heated can get hot, and should be dialed down as the party continues, or food burns.

Overstock.com sometimes carries items that don't sell or " move " very well. That might suggest something,, like looking into a better purchase elsewhere with your original contact.

As they say: Up to you.

Toes cold: Heading back to a warm bed.

-R

Oct 08, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware

Electric raclette maker--advice needed on purchase

Hi Goblin-

May I first draw attention to the fact that you are quite obviously an excellent and accurate judge of character.

My wife and I enjoy using both surfaces: Granite and non-stick (lighter). We try to keep our grilled portions small.
The granite will take bit more time to heat up and cool down than the non-stick, but retains the heat longer.

Good to hear that you enjoyed this first in the Alsace, as next to Switzerland, it would have be well prepared in the traditional manner. Hearth-side, in Winter is always best.

Cheers,

R-

Oct 07, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware

Electric raclette maker--advice needed on purchase

A warm Greuzi to you Goblin, and Nanny K -

Reading your post, you have a good handle on Raclette basics. Most of us do have the new electric units such as Swissmar.

The original method was to leave a half wheel of perhaps older cheese by the fireside hearth, and scrape it off (Racler) onto cooked potatoes when warm. Like Fondue, this is a way of being frugal with leftovers, adding a touch of national pride which many take quite seriously.

My eldest son managed to burn his forearm on a commercial unit during the Independence Day celebration this past 01.August, serving roughly 1200 plates of Raclette. So reaching over an energized Raclette device is to be avoided as looks versus actual temperature levels can be deceiving. It happens, so a reminder for adults and children is always in order per meal.

The newer units are electric (110-240v) and either hold a "baby half wheel or quarter wheel" to melt right-side up, or a small shovel-looking metal plate which holds cheese to melt over small meat or vegetables.

There are sliced packages of Raclette mix cheese in Switzerland, France, Germany, and Austria, which is convenient and quite good. I found visiting California that Trader Joes surprisingly carries the French product (repackaged), periodically. If there is a store near you I would recommend it for a start.

Goblin, if you find a good value choice on the Swissmar unit, I would suggest selecting the non-stick plate and the optional polished granite plate. From Speck, to shrimp, steak, and sliced vegetables, nothing falls off, or too oily, as it cooks very fast when hot, even in Winter.

The routine with granite is to first cook the meat or vegetable, then place it in the little nonstick trays and melt cheese over it.
A salad, bread, and a bit of hot tea, apple juice, or wine is all you need. Or even perhaps a Mason jar (or 5, as the song goes) of homemade Apple Cidre courtesy of K and his new apple press !

Let us know what you ultimately select. Winter is nigh upon us.

Cheers,

R-

Oct 07, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware

Questions about Nespresso machines and Frothers

Morgen heymizD -

Congratulations on the new Pixie in your life.

Sounds like you really enjoy it. You might consider the merits of looking into the soft ( foam rubber ) carrying case for the Nespresso models. I take a Pixie when I fly on business, and it helps to keep the machine and the Nespresso capsules intact.

If you are referring to the Nespresso Boutique store in SFO, they would probably have one of the travel cases I mentioned above for you to look and try out. The case can hold a number of capsule sleeves, but I find it easier to pack a bundle of them in the empty water reservoir.

And as it is 05:45 AM here now, it is time for the morning Dulsao do Brasil.

Cheers,

Oct 02, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware

Coffee shop etiquette: lines and limited tables

Politely, with manners.

Sep 26, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Greater Seattle

Coffee shop etiquette: lines and limited tables

Buy a Nespresso and just skip the lines.

Coffee whenever you want it, in your 'jammies, 24 x 7.

No going out in the rain, heat, or snow, and never a queue of ill-mannered grunties at 05:00.

Sep 26, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Greater Seattle

Large tins of olive oil

Excellent mbfant !

Have you also been there ?

Most of the olive oil amphorae shards there are inscribed. There is a good little cafe there, backed up against a solid wall of broken terra cotta, too. That owner stated that the Romans were too lazy to clean plates, cups, and amphorae, and after one or two uses, would just toss it all out. The disposal pile hill officially was created later under law, as too much broken terra cotta was piling up in the streets.

The boats ferrying the amphorae from Spain would stabilize them in racks, with bottom amphorae "points " placed in sand.

Unlike the convenience of the plastic twist-off caps on oil tins today, the amphorae had either cork or wood plugs, sealed in wax, or boiled down tree resin. (As in Greek Retsina wine).

I'll take the bulk alu tin today, with a small stainless steel decanter in the kitchen.

Sep 26, 2014
SWISSAIRE in General Topics

Large tins of olive oil

There is an entire hill of broken shards of terra cotta in Rome by the way, much of it being olive oil and wine amphorae, should anyone be interested.

Sep 26, 2014
SWISSAIRE in General Topics

Large tins of olive oil

Problem is no matter how hard I try, it just doesn't hold olive oil anymore.

Sep 25, 2014
SWISSAIRE in General Topics

I think I saw a mouse in frying pan....throw out or clean it?

Reminds me of the "Caddyshack" scene with the candy bar in the pool.

Judge Snails: " I want this pool ( 50 metre Olympic sized no less) drained, washed, cleaned, and sanitized ! "

Or --------( wait for it ) ------ " Mouse Hunt. "

What a fun post this one is. I can now go back to sleep laughing.

Sep 25, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Not About Food

Large tins of olive oil

Hi Bob96 -

Koroneiki from Krete.
Bob, thank you for the details. I want to try that.

Spain. Iberia, and the Latin Hispania (Spain & Portugal), and olive oil production:

Spain has been known for some of the finest olive oil historically, especially by the Romans. Hispania Tarraconensis, or Andalusia, was specifically appreciated.

Foto: A little olive oil "tin" from Hispania Baetica, (Andalusia) that didn't quite make it up over the Alps.

I bought the broken shards (legally) and put it back together over one long Winter period, using wallboard tape rolled up on a stick, with glue from the inside out. Like building a kayak, if you will.

Inscribed in Latin on the neck is "--( unknown sellers' name), Best oil of Baetica."

Sep 25, 2014
SWISSAIRE in General Topics
1

Large tins of olive oil

Hi K-

There is commonality.

Did you know that Greece produces over 440 unique varieties of cheese ?

Switzerland, known for frugality which includes using day-old bread, cheese, a bit of garlic, flour, and white wine, turns that into the national dish Fondu.

Yet that identical recipe above, appears in Homer's Iliad (song XI). With all respect to Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, surely that Homeric dish of " Pramnos wine, grated goat's cheese, garlic, and white flour " was a Fondue.

Sep 25, 2014
SWISSAIRE in General Topics

Large tins of olive oil

Hi K-

At home (in my humble opinion) there is nothing wrong in this practice. It is a great way to store Kalamatas for salads, with the byproduct being a wonderful tasting olive oil.

It similar to adding a few Vanilla pods to the sugar container for flavour. Just keep it out of sunlight to store.

For export sales to the world with the great cost added, that is another matter.

However, our preference is for taste and very minor cooking with oil, perhaps a small teaspoon or half at the most. We prefer the excellent taste of Azeite (olive oil) Gallo to drizzle on pasta, salad, or vegetables. Only in a small tin as we use so little.

http://www.gallooliveoil.com/int-de.aspx - for English, click on the country and language of choice.

Production of olive oil in this region goes back an impressive 6,000 + years, most probably originating from Greek traders and colonies.

Sep 25, 2014
SWISSAIRE in General Topics

Large tins of olive oil

I will share a secret that may prevent me vacationing in Greece ever again:

Frequently, Kalamata Olives are added to a standard olive oil, of questionable parentage and dubious nationality.

Then suddenly, as if by magic, the price doubles, or triples, the can becomes an amphora-like bottle, and the product is touted as perhaps as Ancient Greek, or dare I say, Hellenic Blue Kalamata Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

Presto. Amazing !

Comments arise looking for confirmation. " You can always tell, " " This is pure Greek, " or my favourite " I know you spend a fortune on this, don't you. "

At this point you merely nod, smile faintly, or wink knowingly, but never, ever speak a word.

And even more amazing it can be done at home too, a day or two before the guests arrive.

Sep 25, 2014
SWISSAIRE in General Topics

Do you like induction cooktops? Details, please.

Hi Ray -

Thank you for the clarification.

I didn't think anyone was awake on that side of the Atlantic at this hour.

You are correct about your refrigeration needs, but what about the large family with children ?

I think that most households would say that if a family can afford the device and energy bills, they should be allowed to own and use one.

I do not see that energy as wasted at all, especially if it is a new energy efficient model appliance.

Which takes that discussion back to the merits of using induction, correct ?

Sep 25, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware

Do you like induction cooktops? Details, please.

Hi Ray -

We all recognize and appreciate your enthusiasm for induction cooking, especially coming from China.

Unless I am wrong historically, induction cooking and cooktops were first invented, patented in 1900, and produced in North America 40 years ago (GM, Westinghouse, and Delco), a land of many the innovative ideas such as the popular Iphone/Ipad, and Imac.

Induction cooking technology probably did not succeed in the US as it did elsewhere in the world due to the enviable and vast low cost energy supplies of gas and electricity that North America offers.

As you probably know Germany continues to dominate the induction cooktop market, and first introduced the concept to the Asian market, China has recently become the major supplier in Asia ( Japan manufacturing and supplying induction cooktops for it's own domestic market ). China is supplying the bulk of the recent inexpensive induction single cooktops, which are becoming more popular in the US each month. I've seen some 5 zone cooktops in Shanghai and HK which offer very clever features that I wish I had.

Realistically, in 2012, induction still accounted for only 4 % of the US cooking market, but it is growing each year. It has a long way to go to take more market share.

Duffy's point is both factual and valid for the American market, as your comments are for China. CH members come to these posts looking for more hands on, factual information, than guesswork, as can be found on the topic at hand. But as Duffy points out, ultimately this is another form of cooking, albeit quicker, and more energy efficient. Cost figures show a decrease in energy costs too: My use of a built-in cooktop happily results in a electrical cost decrease of 18-20 % per month.

My European induction cookware or cooktop may never levitate, but it does work very well, efficiently, and at a savings that adds up annually. That is what most prospective buyers want to hear, especially in emerging North America market.

Sep 25, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware

Global Sai Knives

Go for it !

Let us know your findings when you can.

Sep 24, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware

Global Sai Knives

Of all the thread replies on this post, Chem offers the best advice.

Go and try the knives out yourself.

Cut the guess work out, and see if you actually favour using the Global Sai, or not. Considering the high expense, would you not test drive a Porsche Panamera first, or similarly a Global Sai set, before you buy ?

Of course you should.

This is a new product, and not many have actual hands-on experience using a Global Sai. That includes celebrity Chefs in Germany (Johannn Lafer, Mike Süsser), France ( Alain Ducasse, Fabrice Desvignes), and other countries here in Europe, many of which are sponsored by many, including Global.

Frequently, one sees a knife set such as a Global in it's gleaming stainless block, well positioned as a prop (which it actually is), and yet the chef is using a different brand that he or she is more comfortable with.

Try before you buy.

Sep 24, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware

"New Revereware"

Photos of collection of 4 found, including bottom logo stamp.

Bottom of pan states " Revereware 1801 2272609 under process patent "

My eldest son equipped with radar-like perception, heard about this find, ( after the Flitz cleaning ) and has requested the collection.

Sep 23, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware

Best Induction Wok Hob Drop In

Hi Peter-

Our son living in California was able to find and purchase the de buyer wok and wok ring on Ebay for half that price, including shipping.

I agree that CULINARIS.EU is charging a exorbitant shipping rate. 75 Euros shipping for a small light stainless steel wok ring is a rather obvious and deep gouge, when it only costs 40 Euros to ship an entire set of heavy lidded German pots and pans to California using DHL.

Sep 22, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware

Best Induction Wok Hob Drop In

Hi Peter-

Attached are photos of the de Buyer Wok (induction conductive) ring, and the woks mentioned previously.

Cooking with both with excellent results.

Sep 22, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware

Best Induction Wok Hob Drop In

Hi Peter-

Our flat induction cooktop (AEG) allows 5 seconds to lift a wok or pan and toss-mix food, or lift and pour food, before shutting off.

If I put our wok back on, the heating power really continues on at 6 seconds, which is more than enough time.

I use 2 -35 cm stainless steel Rösle round woks rated for gas, electric, & induction, using a magnetic stainless steel wok ring. That conductive wok ring includes 4 silicone feet which do not scratch the flat induction glass. The incorporation of that wok ring alleviates the need of a specialized round deep concave induction cook hob, which are not inexpensive. The conductive ring allows the wok to get quite hot on a standard flat induction cooktop.

Some of the growing number of stainless woks clearly function better than others, but they all are built to last, clean off spotlessly, and require no seasoning. The Rösle remains a better, although heavier choice than the AEG fusion and de Buyer models we had.

Whatever your decision and choice, keep us posted and send a few photos if you can.

Sep 22, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware

"New Revereware"

Hi K-

One for Sherlock Holmes.

I found a complete set of 4, used but intact, lids and all.

I have no idea how they got here, or who purchased them, except they were found in my parents collection of cookware. My father was in the United States in the 1960's, so he may have purchased them at that time.

I can read the bottom quite well on one pot and stated in a circular pattern is " Revere Ware Riverside Cal "

I'll work on the copper a little with Flitz pastes, and see what else surfaces, and post the photos.

cheers,

-R

Sep 21, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware

Wild Caught Salmon from Vietnam at Wahoo's at Irvine Spectrum, Irvine, CA [moved from Los Angeles board]

Hi K-

" Politically cleansed fish. "

Sounds like re-education or brainwashing of fish.

-R

Sep 21, 2014
SWISSAIRE in General Topics

basting brushes?

Silicone.

A smaller pastry brush, and a larger BBQ basting (mop) brush with curved arm ( so mine do not get burned ). Both Rösle.

Tip: The smaller pastry brush is a good tool for spreading very little pressed nut in a hot wok, or olive oil on the hot side walls of a deep roasting pan. My No-stick method for stainless steel cookware.

Cleaning: They could go in the dishwasher, but I do them by hand and hang to dry on a kitchen rail.

Sep 19, 2014
SWISSAIRE in Cookware